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Archive for March, 2011

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Madeleine Robinson

Madeleine Robinson
Madeleine Robinson

Madeleine Robinson was born in 1916 in Paris.   She made her movie debut in 1935 in “Promesses”.   Her other films include “The Royalists” in 1947, “Tuesday’s Guest” and “Alone in the World”.   She died in 2004 in Lausanne Switzerland.

Ronald Bergan’s “Guardian” obituary:

Despite her Anglo-Saxon-sounding name, the actor Madeleine Robinson, who has died aged 87, typified the sophistication and allure of French stars, particularly during the 1940s and 1950s. In fact, she was born Madeleine Svoboda in Paris of a Czech father, a pastry chef, and French mother who was a bus conductor.  She chose the name of Daniel Defoe’s castaway because “it was a synonym of liberty”. Throughout her life, she had a series of poodles that she called Vendredi (Friday).   Determinedly independent, Robinson was known not only for the intensity of her performances but for her fiery temperament off stage and screen.   Her confrontations with directors, and squabbles with her lovers and husbands (one of her three being the Spanish writer and actor José-Luis de Villalonga) fed the gossip columns.

She started work in a factory at the age of 14, and then worked as a messenger girl and as a maid in the house of an artist, who encouraged her to enrol for a drama course given by the celebrated director Charles Dullin in the school attached to his Thétre de l’Atelier.   In 1934, aged 18, she appeared in Soldiers Without Uniform, the first of her 79 films, and it was not long before she gained substantial roles in films by the leading French directors of the day, both before the war and during the German occupation.   One of the best was Jean Grémillon’s Lumiere d’Été (1943), banned by the Vichy authorities for its allegorical attack on the decadence and corruption of the ruling classes.  Written by Jacques Prévert, it was set in an isolated mountain hotel where Robinson is the focal point as a naive young woman who has come to meet her dissolute fiance (Pierre Brasseur), a drunken artist.   Disappointed in the soullessness of this society and disillusioned by her fiance, she is drawn to a young engineer whose values eventually inspire her to love.

In Douce (1943), directed by Claude Autant-Lara, she is far from innocent as the ambitious tutor to a young daughter of an aristocratic family with designs on marrying the head of the household.   The following year, she was a young woman trapped in a dreary village, in Sortilèges (1945) by Christian-Jaque, with another poetic Prévert screenplay. Doom and gloom continued in Yves Allegret’s Une Si Jolie Petite Plage (Riptide, 1945), an archetypal fatalistic postwar French drama, which cast Robinson opposite Gérard Philipe in the role of a fugitive at a desolate seaside resort in rainy Normandy in winter.As a dishevelled chambermaid, she vainly tries to rescue him from despair.Not much joy either in Dieu A Besoin Des Hommes (1950) by Jean Delannoy, where Robinson, living on a rugged and barren island off the Brittany coast, is the fiancee rejected by Pierre Fresnay, when he decides that his calling is to become a priest.

For much of the 1950s, Robinson made films for, in her words, raisons alimentaires, but later benefited from better roles as a mature woman.  Claude Chabrol astutely cast her as a neurotic wife of an adulterous wine merchant in A Double Tour (Web Of Passion, 1959), which gained her the best actress award at the Venice Film Festival.   She was also effective as Joseph K’s landlady, Frau Grubach, in Orson Welles’s The Trial (1962). Meanwhile, Robinson was enjoying a parallel stage career, especially powerful in Jean Cocteau’s adaptation of Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire; as the domineering mother in Cocteau’s Les Parents Terribles, the foul-mouthed Martha in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, and playing Brecht’s Mother Courage. One of her last notable screen roles was as the narrow-minded mother of Isabelle Adjani, who took the title role in Camille Claudel (1988).

In 1993, Robinson retired to her house in Switzerland, garlanded with many awards including the Legion of Honour, the National Order of Merit, and Commander of Arts and Letters.· She is survived by a son; her daughter predeceased her.

The above “Guardian” obituary can also be accessed online here.

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Michael Learned

Michael Learned
Michael Learned

Michael Learned was born in 1939 in Washington D.C.   Her films include “Little Mo” in 1978, “Power” with Richard Gere and Julie Christie in 1986 and “For the Love of May”.   Her most famous role however is that of Olivia Walton in the classic television series “The Waltons” which was a stable diet for TV fans in the 1970’s.

IMDB entry:

Four-time Best Actress Emmy Award winner Michael Learned was born on April 9, 1939 in Washington, D.C. The oldest of six daughters of a U.S. State Department employee, she was raised on her family’s farm in Connecticut. The family moved to Austria when she was age 11, and it was while attending boarding school in England that she fell in love with the theater and decided to become an actress.

Learned married Oscar winner Robert Donat‘s nephew Peter Donat, a Canadian citizen, when she was 17 years old, a marriage that lasted 17 years and produced three sons. She learned her craft while acting for the Shakespeare Festivals in both Canada and the U.S. while simultaneously raising a family. She and her husband Peter acted together with San Francisco’s American Conservatory Theatre (ACT) in the early 1970s. Her breakthrough came when she was appearing in an ACT production of Noel Coward‘s “Private Lives”, where she was spotted by producer Lee Rich, who cast her as Olivia Walton in his new television series about a Depression era family, The Waltons (1971).

Learned won three Emmy Awards playing the role, and another Emmy for her next foray into series TV, Nurse (1981). She escaped typecasting as Olivia Walton (although she re-prised the role that made her famous in a 1995 TV-movie reunion) while appearing on numerous shows and TV movies, including top-drawer, made-for-TV specials such as the 1986 adaptation of Arthur Miller‘s American Playhouse: All My Sons (1987) with co-starJames Whitmore.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Jon C. Hopwood

The above IMDB entry can also be accessed online here.

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Marlyn Mason

Marilyn Mason
Marilyn Mason

Marlyn Mason was born in 1940 in San Fernando, California.   She made her film debut in 1960 in “Because They’re Young”.   Her other films include “Making It” and in 1969, “The Trouble With Girls” starring Elvis Presley.   She has guest starred in nearly all the major television shows of the 1960’s and 70s.

Gary Brumburgh’s entry:

Bright, vivacious leading lady Marlyn Mason was born on August 7, 1940, in San Fernando, California, and began performing at the age of 5. Encouraged and inspired by her parents, she was given singing and piano lessons while young and appeared on the local “Doye O’Dell Show” at age 9. As a young teenager, she was cast in several stage shows with the Players’ Ring Theatre troupe in Hollywood, including musical versions of “Tom Sawyer” and “Heidi,” as well as the legit plays as “Pick Up Girl” and “The Crucible”.

In 1956, the 16-year-old Marlyn moved into TV work with multiple episodes of “Matinee Theatre”. Throughout the 1960s, she would establish herself firmly into in the medium with guest parts on all the popular shows at the time. Blessed with an inviting, effervescent smile, she added spark and sparkle to such lightweight sitcoms as “My Three Sons,” “Father Knows Best,” “Gomer Pyle,” “Hey Landlord” and “Occasional Wife,” while showing off her dramatic mettle on “Burke’s Law,” “Ben Casey” (a seven part story), “Dr. Kildare,” “Laredo,” “Bonanza,” “Run for Your Life,” “The Invaders” and “Perry Mason” (the original series’ final episode). Seldom pigeon-holed, Marlyn offered a palatable range of “good girl” and “bad girl” interps during this productive time — from the sensual and alluring to the offbeat and freewheeling. One of her more notable “bad girl” roles came in the form of a faithless wife who schemes to murder her lover’s wife and set up David Janssen‘s Richard Kimble character in the process.

Marlyn’s early singing lessons paid off later when she was signed to co-star with Robert GouletSally Ann Howes and Peter Falk in a special TV-musical version of Brigadoon(1966), following that with the role of Carrie in Carousel (1967) again with Goulet. This, in turn, led to her casting in the George Abbott Broadway musical production of “How Now, Dow Jones,” which starred Tony Roberts and Brenda Vaccaro. Though it was only moderately received when it opened in December of 1967 (it lasted 220 performances), Marlyn herself walked away with enthusiastic reviews.

Although the actress made her film debut at the beginning of the 1960s with an unbilled role in Because They’re Young (1960) starring Dick Clark and Victoria Shaw, Marlyn would not perk up the large screen again until the very end of the decade when she nabbed her best known cinematic part as Elvis Presley‘s girl in one of his final films. While shootingThe Trouble with Girls (1969), she was given the opportunity to share a duet with the legend on the novelty song “Sign of the Zodiac”.

The early 1970s brought Marlyn a regular role in the short-lived (one season) but critically acclaimed series _”Longstreet” (1972), as a love interest to James Franciscus. It also presented her with a highly revealing change-of-pace movie role in Making It (1971) as a cougar-type housewife who seduces one of her teacher/husband’s students (Kristoffer Tabori), and the second femme lead in the Barbara Parkins mystery Christina(1974). An abundance of guest star parts continued pouring in with roles on “Love, American Style,” “The Odd Couple,” “Vegas” and “Wonder Woman” and others. TV mini-movies became quite the rage as well and Marlyn graced a number of them — A Storm in Summer (1970), Harpy (1971), Escape (1971), the Emmy Award-winning That Certain Summer (1972), Outrage (1973), Attack on Terror: The FBI vs. the Ku Klux Klan (1975),Last of the Good Guys (1978), and The New Adventures of Heidi (1978).

Since the 1980s, Marlyn has continued her career with appearances in film and TV, albeit at a slimmer pace. She earned her first grandmother role on the TV movie Fifteen and Pregnant (1998), and, most recently, has been seen in a few short films in which she worked in front and behind the camera: Model Rules (2008) (also writer/producer), Big(2009) and The Bag (2010) (also writer/producer).

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Gary Brumburgh / gr-home@pacbell.net

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K.T. Stevens

K.T. Stevens
K.T. Stevens

K.T. Stevens was born in 1919 in Los Angeles.   She was the daughter of director Sam Wood.   Her films include “The Great Man’s Lady” with Barbara Stanwyck in 1942, “Port of New York” in 1949 with Yul Brynner and in 1950, “Harriet Craig” with Joan Crawford.   She died in 1994.

Gary Brumburgh’s entry:

She certainly had the requisite genes for an acting career as her father was the legendary director Sam Wood and her mother was a stage performer. K.T. Stevens wasted no time either. By the time she was 2 years old, she had made her film debut in her father’s silent classic Peck’s Bad Boy (1921), which starred Jackie Coogan. Christened Gloria Wood, she was billed “Baby Gloria Wood” as a toddler. Following high school, she decided to pursue acting full-time, taking drama lessons and apprenticing in summer stock. In 1938, she toured in two productions: “You Can’t Take It with You” and “My Sister Eileen”. The following year, she made her Broadway debut in a walk-on role in “Summer Light”, which was directed by Lee Strasberg. At this point, she was calling herself “Katharine Stevens” (after her favorite actress, Katharine Hepburn), as she did not want to ride on her famous father’s coattails. Eventually, she settled on the initials “K.T.” which she felt added mystery and flair. Although her film career subsided, she flourished on radio (“Junior Miss”) and on the Broadway stage where “The Man Who Came to Dinner” (1940), “Yankee Point” (1942) and “Nine Girls” 1943) helped boost her reputation. K.T. met actor Hugh Marlowe after they appeared together on Broadway in “The Land Is Bright” (1941). Co-starring in a 1944 Chicago production of “The Voice of the Turtle”, they married in 1946. The couple went on to grace more than 20 stage shows together, including a Broadway production of the classic film Laura (1944), in which she played the mysterious title role and he played the obsessed detective. In the 1950s, K.T. moved to TV episodics with Perry Mason (1957), Alfred Hitchcock Presents (1955) andThe Big Valley (1965), just a few of her guest appearances. She possessed an open-faced prettiness and seemed ideal for film noir, but her chance to breakthrough never materialized despite decent roles in Kitty Foyle (1940), which was directed by her father,The Great Man’s Lady (1942) starring Barbara StanwyckPort of New York (1949) with Yul BrynnerVice Squad (1953) featuring Paulette Goddard and the sci-fi film Missile to the Moon (1958). Following her 1967 divorce from Marlowe, K.T. abandoned acting for a time in favor of teaching nursery school. She eventually returned to TV and made some strides in daytime soaps, most notably The Young and the Restless (1973). She also served three terms as President of the L.A. local branch of AFTRA. K.T. had two sons, Jeffrey Marlowe, born in 1948 and Christian, born in 1951, the latter best known these days as sportscaster Chris Marlowe. She died of lung cancer in 1994.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Gary Brumburgh / gr-home@pacbell.net

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Marianne Sagebrecht

Marianne Sagebrecht
Marianne Sagebrecht

Marianne Sagebrecht was born in 1945 in Bavaria, Germany.   Her films include “Bagdad Cafe”, “Sugarbaby” and “War of the Roses” with Michael Douglas and Kathleen Turner.

TCM Overview:

This  character player with a heart-shaped face and child-like features began her career as a leading producer and performer of Germany’s alternative theater/cabaret scene. The eclectic background of Marianne Sagebrecht included stints as a medical lab assistant and magazine assistant editor before she found her calling in show business. Claiming to be inspired by Bavaria’s mad King Ludwig II, she became known as the “mother of Munich’s sub-culture” as producer and performer of avant-garde theater and cabaret revues, particularly with her troupe Opera Curiosa. Spotted by director Percy Adlon in a 1977 production of “Adele Spitzeder” in which she essayed the role of a delicate prostitute, Sagebrecht was cast as Madame Sanchez/Mrs. Sancho Panza in Adlon’s TV special “Herr Kischott” (1979), a spin on “Don Quixote”. The director put her in his 1983 feature “The Swing” in a small role and then created the leading role of Marianne, an overweight mortician in love with a subway conductor, in “Sugarbaby” (1985) especially for her.

American films beckoned as well and Sagebrecht was often cast in roles tailored to her unique abilities. Paul Mazursky reworked the part of a Teutonic masseuse for her in “Moon Over Parador” (1988) while Danny De Vito tailored the part of the German housekeeper for a divorcing couple in “The War of the Roses” (1989). Returning to Germany, she shone as the timid maid in the 1930s who marries her Jewish employer for convenience then falls in love in “Martha and I” (1990; released in the USA in 1995). Sagebrecht headlined the black comedy as an unhappy wife whose straying husband plots her death in “Mona Must Die” (1994) and had small supporting parts in “The Ogre” (1996) and “Lost Luggage” (1998).

The above TCM overview can now be accessed online here.

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Dominic Purcell

Dominic Purcell
Dominic Purcell

Dominic Purcell was born in 1970 in Merseyside.   His parents were from Co Louth in Ireland where they now live again.   His family emigrated to Australia where be began his acting career.   He has pursued his career in the U.S.   His films include “Mission Impossible 2”, “Equilibrium” and “Primeval”.   He starred in the highly popular TV series “Prison Break” and is currently starring in the remake of “Straw Dogs”.   To view Dominic Purcell Website, please click here.

IMDB entry:

At the age of two, Dominic and his family moved from England to Sydney’s Bondi and then moved to the Western Suburbs. After becoming a landscape gardener, he soon tired of the profession and, whilst watching the war movie Platoon (1986), decided to become an actor. Due to his working-class background, acting seemed a very unlikely choice of career, so he didn’t pursue it until sometime later. He studied at The Australian Theatre for Young People (ATYP) and then later enrolled at the Western Australian Academy of Performing arts where he met his future wife Rebecca and studied with Hugh Jackman.

In 1997, Dominic scored a role in the TV series Raw FM (1997) and then landed a part inMission: Impossible II (2000), which was filmed in Australia. He was soon spotted by a US talent scout and went off to LA. Since then, Dominic has been working constantly with roles in the movie Equilibrium (2002), the TV show John Doe (2002), Blade: Trinity(2004), and in the upcoming thriller Three Way (2004) and a new police television drama, Strut.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Aeryn

The above IMDB entry can also be accessed online here.

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Dolores Michaels

Dolores Michaels
Dolores Michaels

 

Dolores Michaels in 1933 in Missouri.   She made her movies debut in 1957 in “The Wayward Bus” with Rick Jason, Joan Collins and Jayne Mansfield.   She went on to make “Time Limit” opposite Richard Widmark, “The Fiend Who Walked the West”, “Fraulein” with Dana Wynter, “April Love” with Pat Boone and Shirley Jones and “Warlock” with Henry Fonda and Dorothy Malone.   She retired from acting in the early 1960’s.   Dolores Michaels died in 2001.

“Wikipedia entry”:

Michaels was born in Kansas City, Missouri,[1] to Raymond Roscoe Michaels and his wife Esther Marie Holcomb.[2]). Her father had been a professional baseball player who was acatcher in the Chicago Cubs.[3] He then became a food broker.[4]

Michaels had the same birthday as Franklin D. Roosevelt, and was born only five weeks before he was inaugurated President of the United States on March 4. Before her third birthday her father sent the president a birthday card informing him of the connection. Roosevelt replied sending Dolores his best wishes on her birthday.[5]

She began studying ballet at age five, and went to New York City to study dance and drama before she graduated from Bishop Hogan High School .[1][6] Her older sister, Gloria Michaels, had gone to New York City and joined the traveling cast of Brigadoon. When the musical came to Kansas City, 16-year old Dolores was inited to join them.[7]

Michaels moved to Laguna Beach, California after she married interior decorator Maurice Martiné in 1953.[8] They separated in 1958.[9] In January 1959, she filed for divorce.[10] At the hearing she testified that Martiné had moved them into an expensive unfinished house, without heat or water, and that he expected her to bathe in the ocean, something she didn’t want to do because she was constantly catching a cold. The divorce became final on September 29, 1959.[11] During her separation and after the divorce, she dated actor John Duke.[12]

Michaels was discovered when she was doing a scene in an acting class at 20th Century-Fox‘s talent school. A group of producers and directors were in the audience, and after the scenes were finished, the audience voted on who gave the best performance. She won and got a contract with 20th Century-Fox.[13]

Joanne Woodward was supposed to have the part of “Mildred Pritchard” in The Wayward Bus (1957), but Woodward dropped out to star in The Three Faces of Eve, and the part went to Michaels at the last minute, her first acting role.[13] United Press International said in a review of the film that Michaels’ “torrid” scene, a seduction scene in a hayloft where she makes a pass at the bus driver (Rick Jason), “manages to steal the sexiest scene in the picture,” over better known sirens as Jayne Mansfield and Joan Collins. And also said that Hollywood had not had a scene like this since Jane Russell in The Outlaw. Director Victor Vicas shot the scene twice, an “A” scene and a “B” scene because of the censors.[14]

Her publicist released a biography that stated she had attended the University of Kansas for one year and was a member of the Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. But, people, trying to remember if they knew her, at both the university and the sorority could find no record of her at either entity. The fact was that she had enrolled at the university in the fall of 1951 and was “rushed” by the sorority, but she only stayed at the school a few weeks and then dropped out, and she did not join the sorority. He publicist had fabricated her biography to enhance it.[15]

Early in her Hollywood career she struggled with her weight, as she was a compulsive eater. After trying all kinds of diets, she realized that the problem was “mental.” While a ballet dancer in New York City, her weight reached 152 pounds, this on a five-foot-five-inch frame. By the time she signed her contract with 20th Century-Fox, though, she weighed 135 pounds. She developed work-related anxiety; she would lose weight when she was not working, but once she got a role, she would start eating again, at times eating a two-pound box of chocolates in a single sitting. Michaels would eat fruit and cottage cheese all day and then raid the refrigerator at midnight, sometimes not even remembering that she had until she opened the refrigerator the next morning. The turning point came after the death of her father (he died April 15, 1959-[16]); he was the one who had pushed her in her career, and without him, she felt lost. She went into psychological analysis and learned that she needed to “respect” her job. Michaels went down to 115 pounds and her career took off. She told Associated Press Hollywood reporter Bob Thomas: “I’m convinced that most weight problems stem from mental causes. But most people who lose weight on diets gain it back because they don’t know the reasons why they crave food. Generally it is because of some frustration in their lives.”[17][18] Her psychologist told her to act and not dance ballet.[3]

Michaels wanted to be taken seriously as an actress and not be treated as a sex symbol. When one reporter asked her for her measurements, she responded, “You can go to the wardrobe department and find out.” She also said that she had never been asked to go to the studio photo gallery, stating, “That’s part of the old Hollywood glamor nonsense. Also, it’s in bad taste. I’m not a sexpot, I’m an actress”.[19] Later she told Hollywood columnist Erskine Johnson: “I favor the truly sensual photograph over the coyly teasing garter shots. I’d even rather be posed artistically nude than photographed giggling from behind a Venetian blind. I have never objected to posing. It’s just that I wanted to build a career as an actress first”.[20]

Michaels’ acting career lasted ten years from 1953-1963. Among her final appearances was the role of murderer Jo Sands in the 1962 Perry Mason episode, “The Case of the Playboy Pugilist.” She made her final appearance the following year on an episode of The Lloyd Bridges Show.

After John Duke, she started dating Argentine actor Alejandro Rey, whom she met on the set of Battle at Bloody Beach.[21] She then started dating Novelist-screenwriter Bernard Wolfe (1915-1985), who proposed to her in 1962, but she sent the engagement ring back to him with a note that read, “I don’t wanna”.[22] Michaels and Wolfe married in Los Angeles on June 1, 1964.[23] The marriage was her second and his first. He was 48 and she was 31. The couple divorced in October 1969.[24]

She and Wolfe had twin daughters, Jordan M. and Miranda I., born in Los Angeles on July 23, 1970.

Dolores Michaels Wolfe died at the age of 68 in West Hollywood, California, of natural causes on September 25, 2001.

The above “Wikipedia” entry can also be accessed online here.

Comment om TCM:

I turned on the tv this morning and Battle at Bloody Beach was on. I started to change the channel, but the name Audie Murphy in the info made me pause and then when I saw Dolores Michaels I got a little more hooked. Something about her look really caught my attention. The name Dolores Michales made me think of the movie “Where the Boys Are”. To me she looked like an older, more world weary Merritt(Dolores Hart). Ms.Michaels character was strong, but she had just realized how strong she was when her husband was reported dead. I believe it was two years later when he showed up very much alive. Her struggle to still be a strong woman and fight for what she belived in and still be his wife was more then she thought she could handle during this time of war. Their fight with others just to survive is the most imortant thing they had to worry about. I really enjoyed this movie and look foward to seeing her in other movies.


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John Savident

John Savident
John Savident

John Savident was born in 1938 in Guernsey, Channel Islands.   He is best known for his role as Fred Elliott in “Coronation Street”.   His films include”Battle of Britain” in 1969,  “A Clockwork Orange” in 1971 and “Mountains of the Moon” in 1990.

Article in “MailOnline”:

Coronation Street star John Savident notched up roles in cinema classics and Hollywood blockbusters before finally finding fame for his larger-than-life character in Britain’s longest-running soap.

Although a familiar face for his string of minor roles on screen, it was butcher Fred Elliott who made him a household name after 30 years in acting.

He was born in Guernsey, to a father who was a local fisherman and a Swiss mother. They moved when Savident – whose real surname is Joseph – was just three years old, settling in Ashton-under-Lyne, near Manchester.

Before finding his feet on the stage, the star pounded the beat as a policeman in Manchester for six years, training alongside John Stalker who went on to become Deputy Chief Constable of Greater Manchester. 

During those days he suffered a stabbing injury when he tried to break up a vicious gang fight, taking an injury to the arm. “I thought I’d had it,” he recalled. 

He pursued his acting ambitions through amateur productions but a chance remark in a pub led to him quitting the force to treat the boards full-time.

Discussing his desire to turn professional in a pub while appearing in South Pacific, a producer overheard him and offered him a part as Robin Hood in a London panto. He went on to star in numerous stage productions, embracing the West End and Royal National Theatre. 

Early film roles included parts in Battle Of Britain, Stanley Kubrick’s controversial A Clockwork Orange – banned for years at the director’s insistence – and later Gandhi.

His skills also brought him to the attention of Hollywood producers, with roles in the Bruce Willis film, Hudson Hawk, and Loch Ness.   Savident’s vaguely menacing demeanour made him perfect for TV villains, such as the blackmailer Raffles in the BBC dramatisation Middlemarch.   He was also lined up to play disgraced publisher Robert Maxwell in a stage production but legal problems scuppered the show.   Away from the Street the actor’s real voice is rather more refined than the broad Lancashire accent he adopts for the part. “I made Fred speak like the loud Lancashire people you used to meet in pubs – you could hear them from the other side,” he once recalled.   I’ve got that booming voice anyway. I’m forever getting told at home, ‘stop booming John’.”   In the Street the butcher’s love life has been an ongoing saga. He has long had his eye on Audrey Roberts and recently proposed, but was turned down.   Elliott also wooed Rita, and the pair have remained good friends. He married Maureen in 1997 but she eventually ran off and left him.

In real life, Savident is married to theatrical director Rona with two grow-up children.

The above “MailOnline” article can also be accessed online here.

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Marty Wilde

Marty Wilde
Marty Wilde

 

Marty Wilde was born in 1939 in Blackheath, South London.   He is primarily known as a pop singer in Britain and his contemparies include Cliff Richard and Adam Faith.   He has though made some films as a dramatic actor.   His films include “Jet Storm” with Stanley Baker in 1959, “The Hellions” with Richard Todd and “What A Crazy World” in 1963.   He is the father of singer Kim Wilde.

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Sheila Manahan

Sheila Manahan
Sheila Manahan
Sheila Manahan
Sheila Manahan

Sheila Manahan was born in Dublin in 1924.   Her film debut was in the Irish filmed “Another Shore”.   She went on to have a career in British films.   Her movies included the excellent “Seven Days to Noon” in 1950, “Footsteps in the Fog”, “The Story of Esther Costello” with Joan Crawford and “Only Two Can Play” with Peter Sellers.   She was long married to the wonderful Scottish actor Fultan McCoy.   Sheila Manahan died in 1988.