Your browser (Internet Explorer 6) is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites. Learn how to update your browser.
X

Archive for May, 2012

Aside

Trisha Noble

Trisha Noble
Trisha Noble

Trisha Noble began her show business career as a singer Patsy Ann Noble in her native Australia.   She was born in 1944 in New South Wales.   In the 1970’s she moved to California and guest starred in such TV series as “Colombo” and “Baretta”.   In 1986 she returned to Australia and continued her career there.

IMDB entry:

Dick Clark, immediately signed her as a regular on his series “Bandstand”.

Around that time, Patsy Ann signed a deal with the HMV record label and issued her debut single “I Love You So Much It Hurts” in November 1960. She released three more singles on HMV, of which “Good Looking Boy” became her biggest hit when it reached #6 in Melbourne and #16 in Sydney. In 1961, she was the winner of the first Logie Award for the Best Female Singer on Australian Television. She followed that with a successful acting debut at the Independent Theatre, Sydney, playing the lead role of Carmel in “The Grotto”. Shortly thereafter, Patsy Ann and her mother left for London to further her career. She launched her British career in 1963 and shared her first BBC radio show withThe Beatles, with whom she also appeared on British television. During this period, she recorded for EMI (England and France) with some chart success and performed at the London Palladium and at the Olympia Theatre in Paris.

By 1965, she had turned to acting, taking the role of Francesca in the British thriller Love Is a Woman (1966). She toured England with Cliff Richard and began to work on English television in dramatic and variety shows. In 1967, she married law student Allan Sharpe. During that year, she changed her stage name from Patsy Ann to Trisha and continued to work in British television and film. In her early 20s, she appeared on an Engelbert Humperdinck musical special and was seen by an American producer, who signed her to star in revue at the Las Vegas Sands Hotel. After a six-month engagement, she moved to Los Angeles and made her home there, making guest appearances on various television series. Trisha returned to Australia briefly in the early 1970s and starred in the stage musical “Sweet Charity”. After seven years of marriage, she and Allan divorced and she threw herself into her work. Upon her return to the United States, she worked extensively in television series, miniseries and feature films.

In 1976, she wed American fashion model Scott MacKenzie and the following year gave birth to their son, Patrick. However, after four years of marriage, the couple divorced in 1980. Despite personal setbacks, Trisha’s acting career continued to thrive as she co-starred with Don Knotts and Tim Conway in The Private Eyes (1980) and she landed the role of Detective Rosie Johnson in the Aaron Spelling / Robert Stack police drama Strike Force (1981). In 1983, her father, Buster, had a heart attack and was not expected to live long. At that point, Trisha made a difficult and life-changing decision. She decided to leave her successful acting career in Hollywood to return home to Australia to be with her family. She enjoyed seven years with her father before his death in July 1990. In 1985, Trisha married pharmaceutical scientist Peter Field and started a mineral-water business, Noble Beverages. Several years later, though, her third marriage ended in divorce and the business fell on hard times. At that point, Trisha decided to sell the business and get back to her first love — show business.

In 1997, a 25-song CD collection of her early 1960s recordings was released: “The Story of Patsy Ann Noble: Hits & Rarities”. In August, she filmed a small role in the CBS miniseries Blonde (2001) and was cast in a secret role in Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones (2002). Shortly thereafter, Trisha was cast to co-star with David Campbell in the musical “Shout!” in the role of Thelma O’Keefe, mother of Australian rock ‘n’ roll star, Johnny O’Keefe. The musical opened on January 4, 2001 in Melbourne, Australia, and a cast recording followed in March. To top it all, she was nominated in May for an Australian Entertainment MO Award in the category: Female Musical Theatre Performer of the Year for her role in “Shout!”.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Tina Carwile

The above IMDB entry can also be accessed online here.

Spouse (3)

Aside

Joe Duttine

Joe Duttine
Joe Duttine

Joe Duttine was born in 1970 in Bradford, West Yorkshire.   He has appeared in such television series as “Pie in the Sky”, “Life on Mars”, “Shameless” and “Coronation Street”.   His films include “My NIght With Reg” in 1997.

Aside

Clive Wood

Clive Wood
Clive Wood

Clive Wood was born in 1954 in Croydon.   He was brilliant in 1982 in the series “A Kind of Loving” as Vic Brown.   This was the role created by Alan Bates in the 1962 film version.   His films include “The Knowledge” in 1979 and “Salmon Fishing in the Yemen”.

IMDB entry:

Clive Wood was born in Croydon, Surrey in 1954 and studied drama at the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Art. He first came to notice in the late 1970s at the Bristol Old Vic, playing such diverse roles as a singing gangster in “Guys and Dolls” and the titular hero of “Henry V”. In 1982, he joined the Royal Shakespeare Company, touring with them in North America in the mid-1980s and he has returned to the company at intervals throughout his career. In 2008, he was part of the ensemble group staging the entire canon of William Shakespeare‘s history plays. On television, he gained attention as the “angry young man” anti-hero, “Vic Brown”, in A Kind of Loving (1982) and has had continuing roles in populist ongoing dramas, such as The Bill (1984) and London’s Burning (1988), in which he was joined by his son, Daniel Maiden-Wood.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: don @ minifie-1

Aside

Jeremy Bulloch

Jeremy Bulloch
Jeremy Bulloch

Jeremy Bulloch was born in 1945 in Leicestershire.   He is best known for his perfomances  in the “Star Wars” series.   Other roles include “Spare the Rod” in 1961, “Summer Holiday” with Cliff Richard and “Mary Queen of Scots” in 1971.

IMDB entry:

Jeremy Bulloch was born on February 16, 1945 in Market Harborough, Leicestershire, England. He is one of six children and even at the young age of five was on stage in his school show enjoying acting and singing. After failing a school exam at the age of eleven, Jeremy seemed destined for the acting profession and was soon attending Corona Academy Drama School, making his first professional appearance at the age of twelve when he appeared in a commercial for a breakfast cereal.

Following many appearances on children’s television, Jeremy’s big break came at the age of 17 when he landed a major role in the musical film Summer Holiday (1963) which starred the pop idol Cliff Richard (now Sir Cliff). Shortly after, he went into a BBC soap opera called The Newcomers (1965) which ran for three years and made him a household name in the United Kingdom. In 1969, Jeremy was off to Madrid in Spain to play the leading role in a musical film called Las leandras (1969). This was followed by two major films: The Virgin and the Gypsy (1970) and Mary, Queen of Scots (1971).

During the 1970s, he made many other screen appearances, including the James Bond films, in which he portrayed the character ‘Smithers’ (Q’s assistant). In 1977, Jeremy spent six months in the Far East, where he was based in Singapore and travelled to the Philippines, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia filming a BBC drama documentary called ‘The Sadrina Project’. This documentary was designed to teach the English language to people in the Far East, mainly the Chinese. On a trip to China some 15 years later, where Jeremy was performing in a stage play, he was instantly recognised by hundreds of people who said they had learnt their English from the Sadrina Project.

In 1978, he was starring in the television comedy series Agony (1979), which was co-written by an American called Len Richmond. It was during this series that Jeremy was asked to play a small part in Star Wars: Episode V – The Empire Strikes Back (1980). The part, of course, was Boba Fett – proving the old theatrical saying that “there is no such thing as a small part”! Star Wars: Episode VI – Return of the Jedi (1983) soon followed and Jeremy was invited to reprise the role of Boba.

Since the early 1980s, Jeremy has played many roles on television and on the stage in London’s West End. He has also done two worldwide theatre tours covering the Middle and Far East. Jeremy appeared regularly in the favourite television series Robin Hood(1984), in which he played the part of Edward of Wickham. Jeremy’s son Robbie was asked to play Matthew in the series. ‘Robin of Sherwood’ has a great following all around the world, and Jeremy attends the convention ‘Spirit of Sherwood’ in Novi, Michigan every year, work permitting. Another popular series he has appeared in is Doctor Who (1963) where he played Hal the Archer in ‘The Time Warrior’ with Jon Pertwee, and also Tor in the ‘Space Museum’ with William Hartnell as the Doctor.

Since the re-release of Star Wars in 1997, the interest in the character of Boba Fett has meant that Jeremy has been invited to many sci-fi conventions and events all around the world. His fan mail has increased five-fold, and he manages somehow to reply to everyone that writes to him. In the little leisure time he has left, he loves nothing more than a game of cricket with his friends. Jeremy also enjoys travelling; in the past few years he has spent more time abroad than at home. He has collected an awesome amount of Boba Fett memorabilia, some given to him by dedicated fans, and some he cannot resist buying at toy fairs. His office at home resembles a Boba Fett museum.

Jeremy has three grown-up sons, and lives in London with his wife Maureen, and lucky black cat ‘Percy’.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: The Boba Fett Fan Club

The above IMDB entry can also be accessed online here.

Aside

Nick Cassavettes

Nick Cassavettes
Nick Cassavettes

Nick Cassavettes was born in New York in 1959.   He is the son of John Cassavettes and Gena Rowlands.   He has acted in such films as “Faces/Off” and “The Astronaut’s Wife” ,   He has directed such movies as “Unhook the Stars” and the wonderful “The Notebook” wich starred his mother, James Garner and Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdam.

TCM overview:

Nick Cassavetes began his career as a film and television actor, but made a stronger impact when he discovered his talent for writing and directing. He was born into independent film royalty as the son of Oscar-nominated writer-director-actor John Cassavetes and Oscar-nominated actress Gena Rowlands. Cassavetes’ family tearjerkers “The Notebook” (2004) and “My Sister’s Keeper” (2009) were a far cry from the cinéma vérité style favored by his father, though he shared a thematic interest in the unseen worlds lurking behind the American dream landscape in “She’s So Lovely” (1997) and “Alpha Dog” (2007). True to the family name, Cassavetes was dedicated to building a body of character-driven dramas and bringing a great deal of emotion to the movie screen.

The firstborn child of actress Gena Rowlands and actor-director John Cassavetes, the future filmmaker was born May 21, 1959 in New York City. He made several screen appearance in his father’s films while growing up, including “Husbands” (1970) and “A Woman Under the Influence” (1974), though he did yearn for a movie career – due perhaps to his troubled youth with his notoriously difficult and explosive filmmaker father. Sports was the younger Cassavetes main interest, and he attended Syracuse University on a basketball scholarship until a court injury sidelined the 6’4″ coed’s chances of turning pro. He experienced some success when he subsequently became involved in theater, and eventually shifted his major from literature to drama and graduated with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1976. Cassavetes went on to train further at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts, which both of his parents had also attended.

During the 1980s, Cassavetes earned a living in mostly direct-to-video and B-movies, with the exception of a supporting role in Peter Bogdanovich’s award-winning drama “Mask” (1985), starring Eric Stoltz and Cher. Supporting work in “Assault of the Killer Bimbos” (1988) and a string of guest spots on TV crime dramas followed. He joined several other Hollywood offspring in the action adventure “Young Commandos” (1991) before starring in the three 1993 erotic thrillers “Sins of Desire,” “Body of Influence” and “Sins of the Night.” In 1994, the actor finally earned some positive attention for his portrayal of award-winning playwright and screenwriter Robert E. Sherwood in “Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle” (1994), director Alan Rudolph’s take on the artists and wits that made up the celebrated Algonquin Round Table of the 1920s.

Several more low-budget thrillers followed. In 1996, Cassavetes made his writing and directing debut with “Unhook the Stars,” starring Rowlands as a sixty-something widow with grown children who must deal with the sudden emptiness of her life. The film generally garnered positive reviews, and the following year the fledgling filmmaker’s sophomore effort, “She’s So Lovely” (1997), premiered at the Cannes Film Festival. The movie was developed from an unfinished, unproduced script by father John Cassavetes, and focused on a woman caught between her present happily married state and her past, represented by her first husband. Co-starring real-life marrieds Robin Wright and Sean Penn and featuring John Travolta, the drama earned the Best Actor Prize for Penn at Cannes and showed audiences that, while visually, Cassavetes’ style was very different from his father’s, he shared his same talent for conveying a great deal of emotion on the movie screen.

Cassavetes returned in front of the camera with a villainous turn in the Nicholas Cage/John Travolta actioner “Face/Off” (1997), and appeared in another villainous supporting role in Ted Demme’s prison comedy “Life” (1998), starring Eddie Murphy and Martin Lawrence. In another high-profile supporting role, Cassavetes appeared alongside Johnny Depp as a NASA astronaut who witnesses a life-changing event in outer space in “The Astronaut’s Wife” (1999). Off-camera, Cassavetes teamed with buddy Ted Demme again to co-write the latter’s Academy Award-nominated cocaine chronicle, “Blow” (2000). In 2003, Cassavetes scripted the short film directorial debut of actor Kevin Connolly, a buddy bonding dramedy called “Whatever We Do” (2003). Then, inspired by his own real-life experiences dealing with the treatment of his own seriously ill child, Cassavetes was inspired to direct “John Q” (2002), starring Denzel Washington as a father pushed to extreme measures when the health care system fails to come through for his sick son. While a well-assembled thriller with an intriguing social message at its core, the film did not spark major critical or commercial fires.

His follow-up, the lush and sentimental period love story “The Notebook” (2004), based on the best-selling Nicholas Sparks novel, marked Cassavetes first blockbuster. Working with screenwriter Jeremy Leven, Cassavetes smartly restructured the threadbare novel into a sophisticated storyline with a hint of mystery, one focusing on the memories of young star-crossed lovers (Rachel McAdams, Ryan Gosling) as told by nursing home resident James Garner, and another featuring the elderly version of that story’s leading lady, played by Rowlands. A three-hanky film in the best sense of the expression, “The Notebook” demonstrated a new level of skill for Cassavetes, both cinematically and with his actors. Cassavetes moved away from sentimental territory and into true crime with “Alpha Dog” (2006), based on a true story of wealthy, suburban kids in Los Angeles who emulate movie criminals and gangsta rap but end up in over their heads when a drug deal turns into a kidnapping and murder. The gritty, visceral film featured an outstanding young cast including Justin Timberlake, Emile Hirsch and Ben Foster.

Critics were divided over the ultimate effectiveness of “Alpha Dog” as they were over Cassavetes’ next film, “My Sister’s Keeper” (2009). An adaptation of Jodi Picoult’s novel about a family facing moral dilemmas in deciding how to treat their terminally ill daughter, the film’s heavy-handed melodrama detracted from the complicated issues involved. Cassavetes did, however, direct excellent performances from Cameron Diaz in her first “parent” role, as well as child actors Abigail Breslin and Sofia Vassilieva as the family’s young daughters.

By Susan Clarke

The above TCM overview can also be accessed online here.

Aside

Michael Coles

Michael Coles.
Michael Coles.

Michael Coles was born in 1936 in London.   He had a lengthy career on television.   He was featured in roles in such series as “The Plane Makers” in 1963, “The Likely Lads”, “No Hiding Place” and “Justice” in 1971.   His movies include “”Man Detained” in 1961, “Privare Potter”, “H.M.S. Defiant” and “I Want What I Want” with Anne Heywood.

IMDB entry:

Michael Coles was born on August 12, 1936 in London, England as Ernest Michael Coles. He was an actor, known for The Satanic Rites of Dracula (1973), Dracula A.D. 1972(1972) and Dr. Who and the Daleks (1965). He was married to Maryon Kantaroff. He died on April 26, 2005 in Chelsea, England.

Aside

Julie Adams

Julie Adams
Julie Adams
Julie Adams
Julie Adams

Julie Adams was born in 1926 in Iowa.   The bulk of her movie career was in movies made for Universal-International.   Among her major movies are “Bend of the River” with James Stewart and Rock Hudson, “The Lawless Breed”, “The Man from the Alamo” and “Tickle Me” opposite Elvis Presley.   On television she has starred opposite James Stewart on his show and with Angela Lansbury in “Murder She Wrote.   She is beloved by cinema buffs for her role in “Creature from the Black Lagoon” which was made  in 1954.   She has two sons from her marriage to Ray Danton.

TCM overview:

For generations of moviegoers, the name Julie Adams conjured up an arresting black-and-white image of the actress swimming gracefully through the murky waters of the Amazon – actually, Wakulla Springs in Florida – while the Gill-Man, the scaly man-fish monster in “Creature from the Black Lagoon” (1954), glided below her, captivated by her presence in his environment. The film, one of the greatest titles in science fiction history, came to encapsulate Adams’ career, though she had been an in-demand actress, most notably in Westerns, since the late 1940s. Despite its popularity, “Creature” did little for her film career, but she became one of the most recognizable faces on television, providing poised, highly professional guest turns on series from the early 1960s through the first decade of the 21st century. If she bore any ill will towards her “Creature” typecasting, Adams did not show it, as the title of her 2011 autobiography, The Lucky Southern Star: Reflections from the Black Lagoon, clearly illustrated. If never a household name, Julie Adams enjoyed both exceptional career longevity and the lasting fame afforded to a cult icon.

Born Betty May Adams on Oct. 17, 1926 in Waterloo, IA, she was raised primarily in Little Rock, AR. There, she caught the acting bug while performing in a grade school production of “Hansel and Gretel.” After attending Little Rock Junior College, she lit out for Hollywood in 1946, where she lived with an aunt while studying drama and supporting herself as a part-time secretary. She made her screen debut in “Red, Hot and Blue” (1949), a comedy-musical vehicle for Betty Hutton; Adams was uncredited for her ironic turn as an aspiring starlet. She used her real name for seven low-budget Westerns, all shot within a period of five weeks, for producer Robert Lippert, who cast her as a frontier damsel in need of rescue by B-movie cowboys James “Shamrock” Ellison and Raymond Hatton. Her lucky break came in 1951 when she was tapped to appear in a screen test for Universal opposite Detroit Lions’ defensive end Leon Hart, who was attempting to break into show business. The studio passed on Hart but signed Adams to a contract, for which they also changed her first name to Julia and later Julie.

She worked steadily during the early 1950s, giving solid turns in features like “Bright Victory” (1951), which cast her as the fiancée of blinded soldier Arthur Kennedy. Universal made sure she remained in the public eye thanks to a cheeky publicity campaign that claimed that her legs – “the most perfectly symmetrical in the world,” according to the PR hype – had been insured by the studio for $125,000. She enjoyed a string of leading lady turns opposite the likes of William Powell in “The Treasure of Lost Canyon” (1952), Rock Hudson in Raoul Walsh’s Western “The Lawless Breed” (1953), and Tyrone Power in “The Mississippi Gambler” (1953) for Rudolph Maté. But these were soon overshadowed when Adams was cast as the female lead in Universal’s “Creature from the Black Lagoon,” which remained her most enduring film credit. Cast as a comely researcher on an Amazon expedition for a mythical man-fish hybrid, Adams’ deep water swim, clad in a blinding white bathing suit while the Gill-Man lurked below her, became one of the most iconic images of the 1950s science fiction boom. Repeated TV broadcasts over the course of the next half-century preserved the popularity of both “Creature” and Adams’ appearance in it, but also effectively overshadowed the screen work that came before and after it.

Despite this career-arresting element, Adams worked steadily throughout the 1950s, though largely in unremarkable fare like “Francis Joins the WACs” (1954) and “The Looters” (1955), which co-starred her husband, actor Ray Danton, whom she had married the previous year. The union-gangster drama “Slaughter on Tenth Avenue” (1957) proved to be her last notable feature for decades; by the following year, she had moved almost exclusively into television. There were occasional returns to features, most notably “Tickle Me” (1965) with Elvis Presley, but for the most part, she remained one of the most prolific guest stars on episodic television during the 1960s, as well as an occasional series regular on “General Hospital” (ABC, 1963- ) as Denise Wilton.

After surprising many with her appearance in Dennis Hopper’s psychedelic “The Last Movie” (1971), Adams settled into a season of “The Jimmy Stewart Show” (NBC, 1971-72) as the spouse of Stewart’s university professor. It was followed by a string of off-beat feature roles, including “McQ” (1974), with John Wayne in a rare foray into modern day action, as well as “The Psychic Killer” (1975), an oddball horror picture directed by Danton and a grim adaptation of noir novelist Jim Thompson’s “The Killer Inside Me” (1976). Adams began to settle almost exclusively into TV guest appearances for the next decade. From 1987 to 1993, she had a recurring role as the flirty real estate agent Eve Simpson on “Murder, She Wrote” (CBS, 1984-1996). She remained active on television through the new millennium, most notably in a pair of appearances as Amelia, one of the Others, on “Lost” (ABC, 2004-2010). Viewers with keen hearing also noted Adams as one of the telephone voices in Roman Polanski’s acclaimed film version of “Carnage” (2011). That same year, she published her autobiography, The Lucky Southern Star: Reflections from the Black Lagoon, which she co-authored with Mitchell Danton, one of her two sons from her marriage to Ray Danton.

By Paul Gaite

The above TCM overview can also be accessed online here.

Aside

Philip Lowrie

Philip Lowrie
Philip Lowrie

Philip Lowrie was born in 1936 in Manchester.   He is best known for his portryal as Dennis Tanner which he played from 1960 until 1968 and now again from 2011.   His movies include “Sapphire” in 1959 and “Serious Charge”.

Aside

Richard Dawson

Richard Dawson
Richard Dawson
Richard Dawson
Richard Dawson

Richard Dawson wasborn in Hapmshire in 1932.   He began his career in Britain as a comedian and played at the London Palladium.In the early 1960’s he moved to Hollywood and won fame on television’s “Hogan’s Heroes”.   He also achieved fame as a game show host and as the star of the film “The Running Man” in 1987.   He was married for a time to Diana Dors.   He died in 2012.

“Los Angeles Times” obituary:

Richard Dawson, the British actor who went from comedy co-star in the popular TV series “Hogan’s Heroes” to his best-known role as the charming host of the TV game show “Family Feud” with his trademark of kissing the female contestants on the lips, has died. He was 79.

Dawson died Saturday at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center from complications related to esophageal cancer. The actor, who had been living in Beverly Hills, was diagnosed with the disease about three weeks ago, said his son Gary.

“The way he was on the game show was the way he was in real life,” Gary Dawson said Sunday. “He was always rooting for people — he not only wanted people to win, but to have a comfortable, great experience.”

Dawson’s easy-going style topped with a Cockney accent were evident in his early films in the 1960s such as “King Rat,” “Munster Go Home” and “The Devil’s Brigade,” while his quick wit distinguished him both as a game show contestant in the 1970s on “Match Game” and “I’ve Got A Secret,” and as a performer on “The New Dick Van Dyke Show” and “Rowan and Martin’s Laugh-In,” where he was a regular cast member for two years.

IMDB entry:

Richard Dawson was born Colin Lionel Emm on November 20, 1932 in Gosport, Hampshire, England. When he was 14, he joined the Merchant Marines and served for three years. During that time, he made money boxing. He had to lie about his age and remain tough so the older guys would not hassle him. In the late 1950s, Richard met a British actress named Diana Dors. On April 12, 1959, while in New York for an appearance on The Steve Allen Plymouth Show (1956), the two were married. Richard and Diana’s first child, a son named Mark Dawson, was born in 1960, and a second son, Gary Dawson, was born in 1962. Richard and Diana separated in 1964 and eventually divorced in 1967. When Richard moved to the United States, he began acting on the well-known series, Hogan’s Heroes (1965), in 1965. Richard played the lovable British Corporal Peter Newkirk. The show ended in 1971. Not long after that, in 1973, he became a panelist onMatch Game 73 (1973) and remained there until 1978.

While still on “Match Game”, he hosted his own show, which he is most remembered by, called Family Feud (1976). His trademark, kissing all the female contestants, was one of the things that made the show a warm and friendly program, along with his quick wit, subtle jokes, and ability to make people feel at ease with being on camera. In 1987, Richard co-starred with Arnold Schwarzenegger in the science fiction action movie The Running Man (1987). Richard portrayed an egotistical game show host, Damon Killian, whom many say was a mirror image of himself at one time or another, during his real-life career.

When Richard was 61, he hosted the third incarnation of “Family Feud” in 1994, but had only a short run. On April 6, 1981, the Johnson family appeared on “Family Feud” and Richard was introduced to 27-year-old Gretchen Johnson. They had a daughter, Shannon Dawson (Shannon Nicole Dawson), in 1990, and were married in 1991. They were still married and reside in Beverly Hills, California. Richard narrated TV’s Funniest Game Show Moments (1984) on Fox in early 2000. On Thanksgiving Day, November 23rd, 2000, he hosted a “Family Feud” marathon, which was filmed in 1995. Some people hear the name “Richard Dawson” and may not know who you’re talking about. But say his name, followed by his famous quote “Survey said…!” or mention “Newkirk on Hogan’s Heroes(1965)”, and they’re sure to know who you mean. Richard Dawson died at age 79 of complications from esophageal cancer on June 2, 2012.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Lisa Hansen, RichardDawsonFan@aol.com

The above IMDB entry can also be accessed online here.

Aside

Lee Horsley

Lee Horsley
Lee Horsley

Lee Horsley was born in Texas in 1955.   He has starred in three popular TV series, “Nero Wolfe” in 1981, “Matt Houston” from 1982 until 1985 and “Paradise” from 1988 until 1991.   His movies include “The Sword and the Sorcerer” in 1982 and “Showdown at Area 51! in 2007.

TCM overview:

Born in the tiny town of Muleshoe, TX, actor Lee Horsley started singing in church as a youngster in the Denver area, his vocal talents eventually leading him to tour in stage productions of “West Side Story”, “Damn Yankees”, “Oklahoma!” and “1776” prior to his arrival in Hollywood. He began his TV career as detective Archie Goodwin (opposite William Conrad) in the 1981 NBC drama series “Nero Wolfe” but is best known for his starring role as the detective “Matt Houston” (ABC, 1982-1985). A true outdoorsman, who enjoys fly fishing and horseback riding and participates in celebrity rodeos and other sporting events, Horsley has lent his six-foot-four-inch rugged good looks to a wide array of TV-movies, including “Agatha Christie’s ’13 at Dinner'” (CBS, 1985), “Danielle Steele’s ‘Palomino'” (NBC, 1991) and “The Corpse Had a Familiar Face” (CBS, 1994), as well as two ABC miniseries, “North and South: Book II” and “Crossings” (both 1986), adapted from the best-selling novel by Danielle Steele.

After short series runs with “Guns of Paradise” (ABC, 1988), “Bodies of Evidence” (ABC, 1992-93) and “Hawkeye” (syndicated, 1994-95), Horsley landed the part of wealthy rancher Gardner Poole (opposite Bo Derek) on NBC’s very short-lived “Wind on Water” (1998). His only feature appearance (to date) was as the star of “The Sword and the Sorcerer” (1982), a film that has acquired through the years a devoted following among fantasy film buffs. He took time away from Hollywood in 1987 and 1988 to return to his great love, musical theater, playing legendary silent screen director Mack Sennett in the revival of Jerry Herman’s “Mack & Mabel” at the Paper Mill Playhouse in New Jersey.

The above TCM overview can also be accessed online here.