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Archive for August, 2013

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Philip Dorn

Philip Dorn
Philip Dorn

 

IMDB entry:

A former matinee idol in Holland and Germany, he fled to America before WWII and portrayed anti-Nazi patriots and continental romancers in Hollywood. Forced to retire after suffering an injury while on stage in Holland 1955, he lived out the rest of his life in relative seclusion. Dogged by ill health (phlebitis) in post-war years, he suffered the first of a series of heart attacks in 1945.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: burrell_dale

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Tom Chadbon

Tom Chadbon
Tom Chadbon
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Nick Cave

Nick Cave
Nick Cave
Nick Cave
Nick Cave

 

Nick Cave is best known as a contemporary singer although he has made the occasional film such as “Johnny Suede” in 1991.   He was born in 1957 in the state of Victoria, Australia.

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Dennis Lill

Dennis Lill
Dennis Lill

 

Dennis Lill was born in 1942 in Hamilton, New Zealand.   Most of his career has been based in the U.K.   He made his television debut in “Crossroads” in 1964.  He had a major role in the mini-series “Fall of Eagles” in 1974.    Other credits include series such as “The Regiment” and “Warship and movies such as “The Eagle Has Landed” in 1976.

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Sean Arnold

Sean Arnold
Sean Arnold

 

Sean Arnold is best known for his role as ‘Crozier’ the Chief Inspector in “Bergerac” which ran from 1981 until 1990.   He was bron in Gloucestershire in 1941.   Other credits include “North Sea Hijack” in 1979, “Hunters of the Deep” and “Fuel”.

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Elizabeth Counsell

Elizabeth Counsell
Elizabeth Counsell

Elizabeth Counsell was born in 1942 in Windsor.   She is the daughter of actress Mary Kerridge.   Among Ms Counsell’s credits are “The Mind Benders” in 1963, “From Russia With Love”, “The Intelligence Men”, “Claudia” and more recen tly “Song For Marion” with Terence Stamp and Vanessa Redgrave.

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Christine Lahti

Christine Lahti
Christine Lahti

 

Christine Lahiti
Christine Lahiti

Christine Lahti was born in 1950 in Michigan.   Early in her career, she won two major roles, “And Justice For All” opposite Al Pacino in 1979 and “Whose Life Is It Anyway” opposite Richard Dreyfuss in 1981.   She was nominated for an Oscar for “Swing Shift” with Goldie Hawn and gave a terrific performance in “Running On Empty”.

TCM overview:

Beginning in the late 1970s, acclaimed film, television and stage actress Christine Lahti carved out a niche for herself in an emerging field for Hollywood actresses – roles as professional, independent career women. Uninterested in wasting her dedication to acting on thinly-written supporting roles as girlfriends and wives, Lahti was in the right place at the right time and gave strong showings in character-driven films like “Whose Life is it Anyway?” (1981), “Swing Shift” (1984) and “Running on Empty” (1988), for which she earned an Academy Award nomination. In between film roles as smart, compassionate doctors, lawyers, and educators, Lahti was a constant television presence with her Golden Globe-winning run on the medical drama “Chicago Hope” (CBS, 1994-2000) and award-winning telepics like the homeless family chronicle “No Place Like Home” (CBS, 1989). Throughout her career, Lahti regularly revisited her roots as a theater actress, notably in several plays by Wendy Wasserstein, and also branched out to direct episodic TV and films, making her one of the most respected women in Hollywood and one with a palpable commitment to quality storytelling.

Born April 4, 1949, Lahti was raised in Birmingham, MI where she was the daughter of a surgeon father and a nurse-turned-painter mother. At the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Lahti was active in theater and performed with a mime troupe that toured internationally, including an appearance in a mime version of Shakespeare’s “The Tempest” on the London stage. After graduating with a degree in speech and drama, Lahti intended to earn a Masters from Florida State University, but after only a year, she moved to New York where she studied drama at the renowned HB Studio and The Neighborhood Studio. Waitress work and street mime performing finally gave way to a steady career in television commercials and a breakthrough stage role in David Mamet’s “The Woods” in 1978, for which she earned a Theater World Award. The same year, she made her TV debut as a co-star of the ABC movie-pilot “Dr. Scorpion,” which led to a stint as a series regular on the short-lived “The Harvey Korman Show” (ABC, 1978), where she played the comedian’s daughter.

Lahti’s impressive work alongside drama legend Lee Strasberg in the TV movie “The Last Tenant” (ABC, 1978) caught the eye of producer-director, Norman Jewison. He subsequently cast her as a lawyer and ethics committee member who becomes involved with an ethically questionable lawyer (Al Pacino) in the acclaimed “… And Justice for All” (1979). After a return to the off-Broadway stage to play opposite Kevin Kline in “Loose Ends,” Lahti further established her strength for playing professional, independent women with her role as the doctor of an accident victim (Richard Dreyfus) fighting for his right to die in John Badham’s film adaptation of the Broadway hit “Whose Life Is It Anyway?” (1981). Lahti finally made it to Broadway herself in “Division Street,” Steve Tesich’s comedy about grown-up 1960s hippies in the 1980s and had a small supporting role in the punk rock cult film “Ladies and Gentlemen, the Fabulous Stains” (1981).

After taking a key role in the TV miniseries based on Norman Mailer’s biography of career criminal Gary Gilmore, “The Executioner’s Song” (NBC, 1982), Lahti experienced a major film breakthrough in “Swing Shift” (1984), co-starring opposite Goldie Hawn as her aspiring singer best friend and co-worker at a WWII munitions plant. Injecting the character with a much-needed dose of acerbic wit, Lahti earned great reviews and was recognized with a Best Supporting Actress Oscar nomination. She portrayed another single career woman; this one befriended by a married woman (Mary Tyler Moore) who learns they share a man in common, in the soapy tearjerker “Just Between Friends” (1986). Her role as a repressed woman who blossoms when she falls in love with an East German operative in the controversial ABC miniseries “Amerika” (1987) earned her an Emmy nomination, and she followed up the pair of dramas by playing a free-spirited aunt who inspires her nieces in the lighthearted comedy, “Housekeeping” (1987).

In one of Lahti’s most memorable big screen performances, she earned a Golden Globe nomination for Sidney Lumet’s intense “Running on Empty” (1988). The film starred Lahti and Judd Hirsch as former 1960s political activists on the run from the FBI with a family in tow, including a teen son played by River Ph nix. Lahti returned to Broadway in Wendy Wasserstein’s “The Heidi Chronicles” and concurrently appeared on movie screens in 1989’s “Gross Anatomy,” where she was seen as the stern medical professor of class rebel, Matthew Modine. She gave a Golden Globe Award-winning performance as the matriarch of a family forced to live on the streets in “No Place Like Home” (CBS, 1989), and a CableACE Award as a conservative educator who finds unlikely romance with a Hispanic janitor in “Crazy from the Heart” (TNT, 1991), directed by her husband Thomas Schlamme. After an unchallenging role as William Hurt’s unhappy wife in “The Doctor” (1991), Lahti was back on stage in the off-Broadway play “Three Hotels.”

Following a hiatus, during which the actress gave birth to twins, Lahti returned to work with a string of TV movies and moved behind the camera to nail her directorial debut with “Lieberman in Love” (1995), co-starring as a prostitute opposite Danny Aiello. The film earned an Oscar for Best Live Action Short Film. In 1995, Lahti joined the second season of the CBS medical drama “Chicago Hope” (1994-2000), playing the complicated, ambitious cardiothoracic surgeon and feminist, Dr. Kathryn Austin. The show also gave Lahti the opportunity to direct, and she helmed a number of episodes throughout her on-screen run, while earning four consecutive Emmy nominations as Outstanding Lead Actress in a Drama Series and a victory in 1998. She famously won a Golden Globe for her role in 1998, and was forced to rush out of the ladies’ room and scurry red-faced onto the stage to collect her trophy. During her off-seasons from “Chicago Hope,” Lahti continued to take on new projects, starring in the Goldie Hawn-helmed TV movie about small town secrets, “Hope” (TNT, 1997) and writer-director Stephen Tolkin’s biopic about a religious woman who kills a camp counselor who has molested her son in “Judgment Day: The Ellie Nesler Story” (USA, 1999).

Lahti left “Hope” in 1999 and reunited with Wendy Wasserstein, taking the lead in the playwright’s tale of a prominent senator’s daughter and Surgeon General nominee who comes under a media attack for minor transgressions in “An American Daughter” (Lifetime, 2000). The following year, she stepped behind the camera to direct her first feature film “My First Mister” (2001), a well-reviewed tale of a 17-year-old misfit (Leelee Sobieski) and her relationship with a neurotic middle aged man (Albert Brooks). After strong turns headlining telepics including “The Pilot’s Wife,” (CBS, 2002) and “Out of the Ashes” (Showtime, 2003), where she played a doctor and Jewish holocaust survivor, Lahti returned to series television in The WB drama, “Jack & Bobby” (2004- ). For the show’s short two-season run, Lahti starred as the fiery, strong-willed, pot-smoking college professor mother of two teen sons, one of whom eventually becomes the U.S. President. Despite strong reviews, particularly centering on Lahti’s multidimensional portrayal, the show failed to find a fan base and was cancelled in 2005.

She rebounded with a recurring role on NBC’s Hollywood dramedy “Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip” (NBC, 2006-07), as a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist writing a Vanity Fair piece on the show-within-the-show. Lahti went on to make strong showings in a pair of little-seen indies, beginning with the academia-set comedy “Smart People” (2008), and “Yonkers J ” (2009), a character drama about a professional gambler’s (Chazz Palminteri) estranged relationship with his mentally disabled son. Later in the year, Lahti enjoyed a supporting role in the high profile thriller “Obsessed” starring Beyonce Knowles.

 The above TCM overview can also be viewed online here.
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Gerard Depardieu

Gerard Depeardau
Gerard Depeardau

Gerard Depardieu was born in Indre, France in 1948.   He made his film debut in “Le beatnik et le minet” in 1967.   Among his many film credits are “The Annuity” in 1972, His best known U.S. movie is “Green Card” opposite Andie McDowell in 1990.

Alternately described as the “French Robert De Niro,” or an international sex symbol, acclaimed actor Gerard Depardieu was nonetheless universally regarded as one of the finest international performers of his generation. Miraculously emerging from a childhood of delinquency and crime, Depardieu found his salvation in the theater, and later began working steadily with small roles on French television and in films like “Going Places” (1974), “Barocco” (1976) and “Get Out Your Handkerchiefs” (1977). He won his first César Award under the guidance of New Wave master François Truffaut in “The Last Metro” (1980), directed himself ably in “Le Tartuffe” (1984) and crossed the Atlantic with great success in “Green Card” (1990). More than 20 years into his heralded career, Depardieu continued to garner accolades with leading roles in sweeping period dramas such as “Colonel Chabert” (1994), as well as crowd pleasing fluff like “Asterix & Obelix vs. Caesar” (1999). Despite an apparently empty threat to retire from film completely in 2005, the seemingly tireless actor went on to appear in dozens of films, including the Academy Award-winning biopic “La Vie en Rose” (2007). As an actor, Depardieu brought his own well-documented lust for life to each and every role he inhabited with the tireless dedication of a master artist completely dedicated to his craft. Born Gerard Xavier Marcel Depardieu on Dec. 27, 1948 in Chateauroux, France, his father, Rene, was an illiterate sheet metal worker with a fondness for alcohol, and his mother, Eliette, was “always pregnant,” as he once recounted in an interview. Reared within this impoverished family, Depardieu spent a Dickensian childhood replete with brushes with the law, punctuated by bouts of violence at home and in the neighborhood. A classic juvenile delinquent, he dropped out of school at age 12 and embarked on a hitchhiking tour of Europe that found him stealing cars and selling goods on the black market. He may have been destined for a life of crime had he not discovered acting, thanks to a friend who was attending drama school in Paris. At the friend’s urging, Depardieu enrolled in classes at the Theatre National Populaire and was later apprenticed at the Café de la Gare alongside future co-stars Patrick Dewaere and Miou-Miou. He made his film acting debut in the short “Le Beatnik et le minet” (1965) for writer-director Roger Leenhardt. In 1970 he married Elisabeth Guignot, a Parisian film actress, six years his senior, with whom he would go on to father two children, Guillaume and Julie Depardieu. After years of stage work and appearing regularly on French television and in small roles in a variety of films, such as “Nathalie Granger” (1972), co-starring the great Jeanne Moreau, and the Alain Delon crime drama “Two Men in Town” (1973), Depardieu enjoyed breakout success co-starring as a nihilistic but lovable petty thug with his old theatrical colleague Dewaere in “Les Valseuses” (“Going Places”) (1974), directed by Bertrand Blier. He went on to handle a dual role opposite Isabelle Adjani in “Barocco” (1976) and portrayed a Communist organizer opposite Robert De Niro in Bernardo Bertolucci’s “1900” (1976). Reteaming with Dewaere and Blier, Depardieu co-starred as a man attempting to cheer up his wife by finding her a lover in the Oscar-winning foreign film “Preparez vos mouchoirs” (“Get Out Your Handkerchiefs”) (1977). Other works include the bizarre comedic fantasy “Bye, Bye Monkey” (1978), a film co-starring Marcello Mastroianni, in which Depardieu played a man who finds what he believes to be the son of the deceased King Kong on the beach at Long Island and decides to raise it as his own. Kicking off the 1980s, Depardieu offered up a riveting, award-winning performance as a Resistance fighter in revered French New Wave director François Truffaut’s dark drama “Le Dernier Metro” (“The Last Metro”) (1980), opposite the exquisite Catherine Deneuve. “Le Retour de Martin Guerre” (“The Return of Martin Guerre”) (1982) cast him as a 16th century peasant who may or may not be what he claims. He then gave a passionate interpretation of the title role in “Danton” (1982), Andrzej Wajda’s drama about the Reign of Terror following the French Revolution. Depardieu stepped behind the camera for the first time as co-director of “Le Tartuffe” (1984), a pet project that closely adhered to his acclaimed stage interpretation of the Moliere character. He dominated the middling crime drama “Police” (1985) as a tough cop cracking down on a drug ring and delivered a terrific turn as a naive, inexperienced farmer in “Jean de Florette” (1986). Reuniting with Isabelle Adjani, Depardieu essayed the turbulently passionate love affair between artist Auguste Rodin and the title character in “Camille Claudel” (1988). The following decade began for Depardieu on a similarly high note, with the actor earning some of the best reviews of his career (as well as a Best Actor Oscar nomination) for his bravura interpretation of the classic role of “Cyrano de Bergerac” (1990) for director Jean-Paul Rappeneau. Depardieu pleasantly surprised many with his first foray into English-language films, playing a French musician who agrees to a marriage of convenience in order to obtain his “Green Card” (1990) in Peter Weir’s romantic comedy, co-starring Andie MacDowell. He and his actor son, Guillaume, shared the role of 17th-century composer Marin Marais in the biopic “Tous les matins du monde” (1991), and for the rest of the decade, the actor remained constantly in demand, acting in some 30 film and TV productions. He garnered praise for his turn as the overprotective father of a teenage daughter in “Mon Pere, ce heros” (1991) and reprised the role for the inferior 1994 English-language remake “My Father, the Hero.” Depardieu was miscast, however, as the Italian seafarer Christopher Columbus in “1492: Conquest of Paradise” (1992), although he fared better as a struggling miner in the sprawling epic “Germinal” (1993), helmed by Claude Berri. Earning him some of his best reviews in years, was his performance as an officer who makes his way home only to discover he has been declared legally dead in “Colonel Chabert” (1994). In a series of English language productions, Depardieu first played a hulking lothario romancing Gena Rowlands in “Unhook the Stars” (1996), then portrayed Haley Joel Osment’s imaginary pal in “Bogus” (1996) and had a cameo as Polonius’ servant in Kenneth Branagh’s epically-scaled screen adaptation of “Hamlet” (1996). That same year, the actor divorced his wife of 15 years, Elisabeth, and began a relationship with frequent co-star Carole Bouqeut, to who he would become briefly engaged in 2003. Depardieu and John Malkovich were teamed as aging Musketeers coming to the aide of “The Man in the Iron Mask” (1998), starring Leonardo DiCaprio in the title role of the Dumas classic. At about the same time, he returned to French TV for the first of several miniseries in the title role of the umpteenth remake of “The Count of Monte Cristo” (1998) before portraying the esteemed 19th century novelist-playwright “Balzac” (1999). Depardieu shared the title role of Obelix opposite Christian Clavier in the big-budget, live-action adaptation of a beloved French comic book series in “Asterix et Obelix contre Cesar” (1999), and stepped behind the camera to helm the semi-autobiographical “Un pont entre deux rives” (“The River”) (1999). Depardieu collaborated with Malkovich once again as the persecuted Jean Valjean in a TV adaptation of “Les Miserables” (2000), and he led the international cast of Roland Joffé’s “Vatel” (2000), in which the actor essayed a master steward tragically forced to accommodate the whims of privileged men like the Prince of Condé (Julian Glover) and King Louis XIV (Julian Sands). Less prestigious was his slight miscasting as the Gaultier-like designer in the cartoonish sequel “102 Dalmatians” (2000). Despite a pair of near fatal accidents – a 1996 plane collision and a 1998 motorcycle crash – and various health problems – he underwent coronary bypass surgery in July 2000 – Depardieu appeared unstoppable as he entered the new millennium without any perceptible signs of slowing his pace or output. In addition to reteaming with Daniel Auteuil in the social comedy “Le Placard” (“The Closet”) (2000), he took on the title role as the famous detective “Vidocq” (2001) in a visually arresting action-thriller helmed by the director Pitof. Other efforts that year included “Concurrence Deloyale” (“Unfair Competition”) (2001), the story of two competing merchant families in 1938 Rome. By popular demand, Depardieu reprised his role of Obelix in “Asterix and Obelix: Mission Cleopatra” (2002), featuring the alluring Monica Bellucci as the Queen of the Nile, then joined the international cast of the epic TV miniseries “Napoleon” (A&E, 2002). In “I Am Dina” (2002), he played the older husband of a beautiful but eccentric young woman (Maria Bonnevie) with a troubled past in mid-19th century Norway. He then played a mercurial director fired from a sci-fi movie in “CQ” (2002), director Roman Coppola’s ode to Italian pop-movie filmmakers of the 1960s like Roger Vadim and Mario Bava. Next it was on to the drama “Between Strangers” (2002) opposite Sophia Loren and directed by her son Edoardo Ponti, followed by the comedy “Tais-Toi” (“Shut Up”) (2003), teaming Depardieu with Jean Reno. In the erotic drama “Nathalie” (2003) he played a husband suspected of infidelity by his deviously resourceful wife (Fanny Ardant), then appeared alongside Harvey Keitel as a member of an inept French burglary crew in trouble with the Chicago mob, the FBI, and a Latino street gang in the action comedy “Crime Spree” (2003). Busier than ever, Depardieu also took a role in Matt Dillon’s directorial effort “City of God” (2003) as an unflappable proprietor of a hotel in Cambodia, then reunited with his “Cyrano” director Jean-Paul Rappeneau for the lavishly shot “Bon Voyage” (2003), a multi-narrative tale of several lives caught in the Nazi occupation of France. He launched into the following year with leading roles in the romantic drama “Les Temps Qui Change” (“Changing Times”) (2004) as a man determined to win back the love of his life (Deneuve), and in director Alain Chabat’s silly caveman comedy “RRRrrrr!!!” (2004), followed by a turn as a ruthlessly ambitious cop in “36 Quai Des Orfevres” (2004) and as an 18th century Canadian priest in Jean Boudin’s historical drama “Nouvelle-France” (2004). Prostitutes figured prominently in two of Depardieu’s films the next year. He played the pimp of a conflicted hooker (Bellucci) in the romantic dramedy “How Much Do You Love Me?” (2005) then starred in “Boudu Saved From Drowning” (2005), as a male prostitute taken home by a kind-hearted bookseller (Gerard Jugnot) after unsuccessfully attempting suicide by jumping into the Seine. Newly entered into a relationship with the much younger Clémentine Igou, a Harvard-educated novelist, Depardieu petulantly announced in 2005 that, at age 56, he was done making movies. “I have done 170 films. I have nothing left to prove,” the actor insisted. The pronouncement proved to be little more than a bluff, a cry for attention, or possibly wishful thinking, as the actor quickly returned to his usual relentless output of work. On screens in America, he played a famous chef in the syrupy and inspirational Queen Latifah comedy-drama “Last Holiday” (2006), then returned to France to appear opposite Cecile De France in the well-received musical romantic-drama “When I Was a Singer” (2006). He also contributed both as a director and performer to one of the many vignettes in “Paris, Je T’aime” (2006), a massive collaboration celebrating the City of Love. Despite his leading man status, Depardieu frequently made contributions as a supporting player, such as his portrayal of the doomed nightclub owner who discovers famed French chanteuse Edith Piaf (Marion Cotillard) in the Academy Award-winning biopic “La Vie en Rose” (2007). The next year, Depardieu worked with Vin Diesel in the disappointing sci-fi action-adventure “Babylon A.D.” (2008) and with frequent French co-star Fanny Ardant in the mid-life romantic comedy “Hello, Goodbye” (2008) before personal tragedy befell the celebrated actor.

On Oct. 13, 2008, Depardieu’s son Guillaume – who years earlier had lost a leg due to an infection stemming from injuries suffered in a motorcycle accident – died at the age of 37 from complications linked to a sudden case of pneumonia. The actor chose to bury his grief in work. With no perceptible break in his pace, Depardieu went on to co-star with Olivier Marchal and Asia Argento in the crime thriller “Diamond 13” (2009). He later headlined French New Wave director Claude Chabrol’s final film as the eponymous detective “Inspector Bellamy” (2010), then played the celebrated 19th century French author in the biographical drama “Dumas” (2010). Entering the new decade, Depardieu later played a pensioner exercising the ghosts of his past astride a classic motorcycle in the road trip drama “Mammuth” (2011), and gave a quietly moving performance as a nearly-illiterate man who bonds with a 92-year-old woman over books and birds in “My Afternoons with Margueritte” (2011).

By Bryce Coleman

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Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio

Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio
Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio

 

Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio was born in Illinois in 1958.   She made her major film debut in 1982 in “Scarface” with Al Pacino.   She also starred in “The Colour of Money” with Tom Cruise and Paul Newman, “The Abyss”and “Class Action” with Gene Hackman.   She gave a brilliant performance opposite David Straithairn in “Limbo” in 1999.   She is married to the noted Irish film director Pat O’Connor.

TCM overview:

A gifted actress and singer, Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio was blessed with a striking beauty and undeniable screen presence that brought her recognition alongside some of filmdom’s biggest stars. After making her impressive, blood-soaked feature film debut in Brian De Palma’s controversial gangster epic “Scarface” (1983), she performed on the stages of New York for a time before returning to the screen opposite multi-generational screen idols Paul Newman and Tom Cruise in Martin Scorsese’s “The Color of Money” (1986). However, consequent efforts such as “Slam Dance” (1987) and “The January Man” (1989) failed to capitalize on that early success. Although visionary director James Cameron’s ambitious undersea epic “The Abyss” (1989) placed the actress back in the spotlight, the exhausting and dangerous experience on the set of the adventure may have also soured her taste for blockbuster filmmaking. Early 1990s work included starring turns in respectable films like “Class Action” (1991) and “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves” (1991), followed by participation in the easily forgotten “White Sands” (1992) and “Consenting Adults” (1992). While her output decreased in the years that followed, the actress resurfaced occasionally in high-profile projects like “The Perfect Storm” (2000). Even though her films were not all met with rave reviews, Mastrantonio’s innate talent allowed her to retain a highly respected reputation as one if Hollywood’s more dependable actresses.

Mary Elizabeth Mastrantonio was born on Nov. 17, 1958 in Lombard, IL to Italian immigrant parents. Her mother, Mary, suffered terribly with rheumatoid arthritis for most of her adult life, and her father, Frank Mastrantonio, ran a bronze foundry. The fifth of six daughters, Mary Elizabeth was raised in the town of Oak Park, where she originally cultivated a desire to become a professional opera singer. An early acting role came in a production of “Oklahoma!” while attending Oak Park-River High School, and later in several stage performances at the University of Illinois, where the talented soprano studied music and voice. During a summer between years at college, Mastrantonio worked as a singer and performer at Nashville’s Opryland, before ultimately dropping out of school and making the move to Chicago. There, she landed a small part in the touring production of “Amadeus” before transitioning to New York City and serving as an understudy for the part of Maria in the Broadway revival of “West Side Story.” Eventually Mastrantonio began to move away from musicals, focusing instead on more dramatic works, including a Broadway mounting of “Amadeus,” starring Frank Langella as Salieri.

After seeing her brief appearance in director Martin Scorsese’s “The King of Comedy” (1982) left on the cutting room floor, Mastrantonio made her feature film debut in Brian De Palma’s bloody remake of “Scarface” (1983). Cast as Gina, the beautiful, yet doomed sister of drug kingpin Tony Montana (Al Pacino), the young actress shone in a film largely derided by critics of the time for its extreme brutal violence and graphic language. In what would become a frequent occurrence throughout her career, Mastrantonio would appear in films that drew overall criticism, while her particular performance was singled out appreciatively. De Palma and screenwriter Oliver Stone had the last laugh, however, when in the years that followed, “Scarface” went on to achieve cult status. The burgeoning actress returned to Broadway for a production of the musical “The Human Comedy” in 1984, as well as two consecutive seasons with venerated producer Joseph Papp for mountings of “Henry V” and “Measure for Measure” at the New York Shakespeare Festival. At the same time, she made her television debut opposite George C. Scott in the historical biopic “Mussolini: The Untold Story” (NBC, 1985).

Perhaps regretting having to cut her out of his previous film, Scorsese cast Mastrantonio opposite Paul Newman and Tom Cruise in the pool shark movie “The Color of Money” (1986), a sequel to Newman’s “The Hustler” (1961). As Carmen, Cruise’s “tough cookie” girlfriend-slash-manager in the film, she more than held her own against her famous co-stars. In addition to critical raves for her turn in the film, the role also earned her an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress. Focusing more on projects that interested her rather than chasing a blockbuster movie, Mastrantonio next co-starred with Tom Hulce in the quirky, punk-infused neo-noir “Slam Dance” (1987), as the wife of an unfaithful husband (Hulce) framed for the murder of his lover (Virginia Madsen). Next came “The January Man” (1989), a comedy-thriller starring Kevin Kline as a brilliant, but disgraced ex-cop trying to catch a serial killer. Mastrantonio played Kline’s love-interest in a film that not only bombed at theaters, but was described by film critic Roger Ebert as “one of the worst movies of all time.”

In spite of the box office failure of “The January Man,” it did result in one happy coincidence for Mastrantonio – her introduction to the film’s director, Pat O’Connor, whom she would marry one year later. Considerably better received than the year’s previous film, director James Cameron’s epic deep sea adventure “The Abyss” (1989) placed the actress in a big-budget, crowd-pleasing blockbuster for the first time in her career. Visually stunning, the film not only pushed the boundaries of filmmaking technology, but pushed its cast, including Ed Harris and Michael Biehn, beyond their limits of endurance. Long hours, boredom, and dangerous working conditions – much of “The Abyss” was filmed underwater inside a seven million gallon water tank – over several months of shooting resulted in a severe emotional breakdown for Mastrantonio. Tough guy Harris even claimed to have broken into uncontrollable sobs one night after a grueling day of filming for alleged “taskmaster” Cameron. Both actors publicly expressed their displeasure with the shoot, with Harris stating he would never work for Cameron again. Needing to recharge her emotional and artistic batteries, Mastrantonio returned to the New York Shakespeare festival with a lauded performance as Viola in “Twelfth Night” alongside her “January Man” co-star, Kevin Kline.

Mastrantonio returned to the screen under the direction of recent husband O’Connor for the Irish period drama “Fools of Fortunes” (1990), and took part in a television adaptation of Anton Chekhov’s “Uncle Vanya” (PBS, 1991) in the role of Yelena. She kept busy with two mainstream feature films that same year. First came director Michael Apted’s courtroom thriller “Class Action” (1991), in which she played a corporate attorney opposing her estranged lawyer father (Gene Hackman) in a high-stakes automotive defect case. Next came a star-studded reinvention of the classic adventure tale “Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves” (1991), featuring Kevin Costner as the titular folk hero and Mastrantonio as his Maid Marian. Although the latter movie met with decidedly mixed reviews, it went on to become one of Mastrantonio’s more successful films at the box office. Less notable were her follow up projects in the coming year. The stylistic noir mystery “White Sands” (1992), starring Willem Dafoe and Mickey Rourke left audiences scratching their heads, while the suburban sexual thriller “Consenting Adults” (1992) simply left moviegoers underwhelmed, despite a strong cast that once again paired Mastrantonio with Kline, in addition to rising star Kevin Spacey.

Settling in London with O’Connor, Mastrantonio slowed her output while she took time to enjoy her newest role as a mother, before returning to film with the treacly fantasy-romance “Three Wishes” (1995), opposite Patrick Swayze. Also that year was the little-seen period drama “Two Bits” (1995), which reunited her with her “Scarface” co-star, Pacino. After another multi-year break, she took on leading roles in the John Sayles Alaskan drama “Limbo” (1999) and appeared with Colin Firth for the British period piece “My Life So Far” (1999). Next, Mastrantonio took part in her first big-budget hit film in nearly a decade with the based-on-fact adventure “The Perfect Storm” (2000), starring George Clooney and Mark Wahlberg as crew members on a doomed fishing vessel off the coast of Massachusetts. Working sporadically for much of the next decade, she focused her efforts primarily on television in such projects as “The Brooke Ellison Story” (A&E, 2004), a biopic directed by Christopher Reeve about a girl’s struggle to succeed, despite her disability as a quadriplegic. Other work included recurring roles on two popular police procedurals: “Without a Trace” (CBS, 2002-09) during the 2005-06 season, and several episodes of “Law & Order: Criminal Intent” (NBC, 2001- ) in 2010.

 The above TCM overview can also be accessed online here.
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Howard Stern

Howard Stern
Howard Stern

 

Howard Stern was born in 1954 in Jackson Heights, New York City.   He is most famous as a radio host.   He has though starred also in the film “Private Parts” in 1996.

IMDB entry:

Howard Allan Stern was born on Jan. 12, 1954, in Jackson Heights, New York. His first radio experience was at Boston University, where he volunteered at the college radio station. Along with several other students, he created an on-air show called the King Schmaltz Bagel Hour, a takeoff on the popular King Biscuit Flour Hour. Predicting his penchant for controversy, the show was canceled after its first broadcast, which included the comedy sketch “Name That Sin,” a game show where contestants confessed their worst sins. Stern graduated in 1976 with a 3.8 grade-point average and a bachelor’s degree in communications. During his first paying radio gig, at an understaffed 3,000-watt station in Briarcliff Manor, New York, “It dawned on me that I would never make it as a straight deejay,” Stern told James S. Kunen in an interview for People (10/22/84), “so I started to mess around. It was unheard-of to mix talking on the phone with playing music. It was outrageous, It was blasphemy.”

– IMDb Mini Biography By: GLLee90298@yahoo.com