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Archive for March, 2014

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Felix Alymer

Felix Aylmer
Felix Aylmer

TCM overview:

Accomplished stage performer, for many years president of the actors organization Equity, who entered film in the early 1930s and often played doddering clerics, bureaucrats or schoolteachers. Aylmer was twice cast as the Archbishop of Canterbury (in “Henry V” 1944 and “Becket” 1964) and played Polonius in Laurence Olivier’s film, “Hamlet” (1948). He was knighted in 1965.

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Ted Neeley

Ted Neeley
Ted Neeley

 

IMDB entry:

Ted Neeley was born on September 20, 1943 in Ranger, Texas, USA. He is an actor, known for Django Unchained (2012), Jesus Christ Superstar (1973) and Summer Camp Nightmare (1987).

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David Burke

David Burke
David Burke

David Burke was born on May 25, 1934 in Liverpool, England. He is an actor, known forThe Woman in Black (2012), Mesmer (1994) and The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes(1984). He has been married to Anna Calder-Marshall since March 20, 1971. They have one child, the actor Tom Burke.

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Veronica Turleigh

Veronica Turleigh
Veronica Turleigh

 

IMDB entry:
Veronica Turleigh was born on January 14, 1903 in County Donegal, Ireland as Bridget Veronica Turleigh. She was an actress, known for The Horse’s Mouth (1958), The Promoter (1952) and Smiling at Grief (1939). She was married to James Laver. She died on September 3, 1971 in England.

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Sondra Locke

Sondra Locke
Sondra Locke

 

TCM overview:

Actress Sondra Locke achieved critical acclaim with her debut performance in “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter” (1968), although it was as Clint Eastwood’s leading lady in films such as “Every Which Way But Loose” (1978) and “Sudden Impact” (1983) that she would be far better remembered. After her breakout success in “The Heart is a Lonely Hunter,” anticipated roles in major films failed to materialize, however, and Locke was initially seen in smaller projects like the exploitation drama “Cover Me Babe” (1970) and the cult-classic “Willard” (1971). Beyond the little seen shocker “A Reflection of Fear” (1973), Locke made guest star appearances on several television series throughout the first half of the decade. With her supporting role in Eastwood’s seminal Western “The Outlaw Josey Wales” (1976), the actress gained more exposure than ever before alongside the revered film’s star, with who she became romantically involved during production. The couple continued working together, and Locke benefitted from exposure in more Eastwood features that included “The Gauntlet” (1977) and “Bronco Billy” (1980). Her film fortunes changed once again after the very bitter, very public and highly litigious breakup with Eastwood in 1989, which found Locke suing the actor-director as well as Warner Bros. for palimony and a fraudulent deal to direct films, respectively. Despite the acrimony that followed the collapse of her famous relationship, Locke will be long remembered for her prominent roles in some of Eastwood’s most beloved works.

Sondra Locke was born on May 28, 1947 in Shelbyville, TN to parents Pauline, a factory worker, and Raymond Smith, a military man. The couple parted ways before Sondra’s birth, however, and Pauline soon married a local construction worker named Alfred Locke, who would raise Sondra as his own. She attended Shelbyville Central High and participated in the drama club prior to graduating in 1962 as class valedictorian. Locke briefly attended Middle Tennessee State University and performed in several stage productions at the school, during which time she met openly-gay future sculptor Gordon Anderson, who she would later marry in an unconventional expression of their lasting friendship. After moving to New York City to further pursue her acting ambitions, she took part in a nationwide talent search held by Warner Bros. for a role in the upcoming feature film “The Heart is A Lonely Hunter” (1968), based on the best-selling novel by Carson McCullers. In an effort to convince the producers that she was 15 years old, the 20-year-old Locke reportedly bound her breasts to hide her adult figure. In her impressive film debut, Locke portrayed Mick Kelly, a lonely, unhappy teenager who befriends a deaf mute (Alan Arkin) in a small Southern town. The performance earned her both Oscar and Golden Globe Award nominations for Best Supporting Actress, in addition to another Golden Globe nod for Most Promising Female Newcomer.

Despite the strong notices garnered by her first screen appearance, few substantial roles came Locke’s way in the years that immediately followed. Appearances throughout the first half of the 1970s consisted of supporting roles in smaller films like the rodent thriller “Willard” (1971), and guest spots in episodes of television series such as “Kung Fu” (ABC, 1972-75) and “Barnaby Jones” (CBS, 1973-1980). Both personally and professionally, everything changed for Locke when she was cast alongside megastar Clint Eastwood in the Western tale of revenge “The Outlaw Josey Wales” (1976). In the widely acclaimed film, Locke played a young pioneer woman who, along with her elderly grandmother, is rescued by Wales (Eastwood), a man out to avenge the murder of his wife and young child. During the course of filming, Locke and Eastwood began a relationship that would generate her most notable film work, and later, an exceptionally ugly and well-publicized split with the powerful actor-director. In a departure from her usual waifish characters, she followed with a turn as a foul-mouthed prostitute being transported to testify against the mob by down-and-out cop Eastwood in the bullet-ridden actioner “The Gauntlet” (1977). Although critics were neither kind to the film or Locke’s performance, the rugged movie star had apparently found his muse, and their collaboration, on screen and off, was just beginning.

Eastwood himself tried a change of pace when he starred as a bare-knuckled brawler in the off-beat comedy “Every Which Way But Loose” (1978), which featured Locke once again as his love interest. While the film received scathing critical reviews, it was a huge hit at the box office, going on to become one of its star’s most successful efforts. Sticking with his winning formula and his leading lady, Eastwood brought Locke on for two more unconventional comedies, the Western parody “Bronco Billy” (1980) and the inevitable sequel “Any Which Way You Can” (1980). On television, she took on a rare non-Eastwood related project when she starred as the famed female crooner in the biopic “Rosie: The Rosemary Clooney Story” (CBS, 1982). Locke next played a mentally unstable femme fatale opposite Eastwood’s Dirty Harry in “Sudden Impact” (1983), the fourth and most successful of the hard-boiled franchise. Long desirous of helming a film herself, Locke made her directorial debut with “Ratboy” (1986), a bizarre fable co-financed by Eastwood, in which she also starred. The film proved to be a critical and financial disaster, and within a few short years Locke’s relationship with her longtime leading man began to deteriorate as well. By the time her next directorial effort – “Impulse” (1990), a thriller starring Theresa Russell – had been released, Locke and Eastwood had already separated acrimoniously. After being shut out of the Los Angeles home she assumed Eastwood had purchased for her, Locke filed a palimony suit against the film icon.

In 1990, Locke underwent a double mastectomy after being diagnosed with breast cancer. That same year, she dropped her lawsuit against Eastwood and accepted a deal with Warner Bros. – longtime home to Eastwood’s production company, Malpaso – to direct films. Although Locke did manage to direct the made-for-TV thriller “Death in Small Doses” (ABC, 1995), it was not a result of the agreement with Warner Bros. After having dozens of proposed feature film projects rejected, Locke went back to court in 1996, this time suing Warner Bros. for fraud, claiming that her “pay or play” deal with the studio was entirely bogus and at least partially financed by Eastwood. The following year, Locke published a tell-all book The Good, the Bad, & the Very Ugly in which she claimed that during their relationship, a manipulative Eastwood coerced her into having two abortions and a tubal ligation, even as he fathered two children with a mistress. She returned to the director’s chair once more with the independent drama “Trading Favors” (1998), starring Rosanna Arquette. In 1999 Eastwood settled with Locke for a reported $7 million dollars. Then, after more than a decade without an acting credit, Locke appeared again onscreen in the made-for-cable thriller “The Prophet’s Game” (Cinemax, 2000) and the direct-to-DVD crime drama “Clean and Narrow” (2000), only to take another extended – possibly permanent – break from Hollywood.

By Bryce Coleman

The above TCM overview can also be accessed online here.

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Brendan Price

Brendan Price
Brendan Price

Brendan Price was born on June 24, 1947 in Coventry, Warwickshire, England as Brendan T. Price. He is an actor, known for Dagon (2001), The Nameless (1999) and Google and the World Brain (2013).

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Robert Lindsay

Robert Lindsay
Robert Lindsay

TCM overview:

This dark-haired, pleasant-faced British actor is equally at home in musical comedy or drama. Often cast as working-class blokes, Robert Lindsay made a splash on both sides of the Atlantic in the mid-1980s starring in the revival of “Me and My Girl”. The RADA-trained actor had already become known to his countrymen as the pub-bound, would-be revolutionary Wolfie Smith in the British sitcom “Citizen Smith” (BBC, 1977-80).

In 1970, shortly after completing his training, Lindsay debuted as Jesus in a London production of “Godspell”. He alternated between TV and stage, joining the Royal Exchange Theatre Company in the late 70s, where he earned attention for playing “Hamlet” in 1983. Starring opposite Emma Thompson, he earned raves as the Cockney chap who proves to be of royal blood in “Me and My Girl”. Thompson was not allowed to recreate her stage role in the USA (Maryann Plunkett inherited the part) but Lindsay was, earning numerous accolades including a Best Musical Actor Tony Award. Subsequent stage roles have included heralded portrayals of Henry II in “Becket” in 1991 and Fagin in a revival of “Oliver!” in 1996.

Before he landed his breakthrough stage role, Lindsay worked often on British TV. He was among the members of the RAF in the 1950s in the Thames TV sitcom “Get Some In!” (1975-78) before landing the role of “Citizen Smith”. He perfected his Cockney accent as a pool hall denizen alongside Paul McGann in “Give Us a Break” (1983) before landing more prestigious parts like Edmund to Laurence Olivier’s “King Lear” in 1984. Lindsay delivered a brilliant performance as a KGB saboteur posing as a priest in “Confessional” (Granada TV, 1990) and received a BAFTA Award as a ruthless politician in “GBH” (BBC, 1991). Lindsay also won much attention as a former SS officer being tormented by the ghost of a Jewish comedian (Antony Sher) killed in a concentration camp in “Gengis Cohn” (1993; aired in the USA on A&E).

Lindsay’s film appearances have been rare. His talents were supposed to be showcased as a coal miner with showbiz aspirations in Carl Reiner’s “Bert Rigby, You’re a Fool” (1989), but the film did almost no box office. “Strike It Rich” (1990), an inferior remake of 1956’s “Loser Takes All”, teamed the actor with Molly Ringwald in a tale of a honeymooner in Monte Carlo who supposedly perfects a system for winning at roulette. More recently, he was among the zookeepers fighting for their jobs in the uneven “Fierce Creatures” and a smooth-talking businessman who revisits an old love in the comedy “Remember Me” (both 1997). Lindsay then co-starred with Julie Walters (who had played his mother in “GBH”!) as a married couple trying to change their fortunes by offering strip shows at their dingy pub in “Brazen Hussies” (lensed 1997).

 The above TCM overview can also be accessed online here.
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Barbara Kellerman

Barbara Kellerman
Barbara Kellerman

 

“Wikipedia” entry:

Barbara Kellerman (born 30 December 1949 in ManchesterLancashire; surname at birth: Kellermann) is an English actress, noted for her film and television roles. She trained at Rose Bruford College.[1]

Kellerman’s  father, Dr Walter Kellermann (born 1915, died 2012), had fled Nazi Germany and settled in Leeds, where he became a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Physicsat the University of Leeds. Her mother, Marcelle, was a member of the French Resistance during the Second World War who became a teacher of modern foreign languages.[2]

Kellerman has a younger brother Clive and a younger sister Judith.[3]

Kellerman’s film credits include: Satan’s SlaveThe Monster Club and The Sea Wolves.

Her television appearances include: Space: 1999The Glittering Prizes1990The ProfessionalsThe Mad DeathQuatermass and The Chronicles of Narnia.

She is also notable for her appearances in the BBC adaptations of three of the Narnia books. She played the White Witch in The Lion, the Witch & the Wardrobe (1988), the Old Hag (Narnian Hag) in Prince Caspian in (1989) and continued on to be the villainous Lady of the Green Kirtle in The Silver Chair in 1990.

On the radio, she portrayed Modesty Blaise in a 1978 BBC World Service adaptation of the novel Last Day in Limbo.

She made a 20-minute drama for With Light Productions in 2007 for director Anita Parry entitled The Lights of Santa Cruz. It co-starred Christian Rodska and was the story of two middle-aged divorcees doing up a boat on theSomerset coast. It was filmed in WatchetSomerset (a small shipping port on the south west coast of England) over a four-day period, mostly on a refitted Swedish fishing boat, the Josefine. The film was entered into Bristol‘s Brief Encounters Festival and is currently looking for distribution.

She is a former wife of Robin Scobey (1975-?).

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Michael Latimer

Michael Latimer
Michael Latimer

 

IMDB entry:

Trained RADA. Stage Actor in Rep and West End (six productions). Many TV Plays and episodes of series. Written 37 TV Scripts including BBC play “The Interview”. Moved from Acting to Directing and writing in 198O. Has directed over fifty productions in London, Sydney, Frankfurt, Sheffield, Florida and major UK provincial Theatres.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Patrick Mower

 

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Russell Tovey

Russell Tovey
Russell Tovey

 

Simon Hattenstone’s “Guardian” article:

You want laddish? Russell Tovey‘s your man. In the beautifully observed TV sitcom Him & Her, he plays Steve, an unemployed procrastinator whose ambitions stretch to drinking, watching porn and shagging his girlfriend. As bewildered werewolf George Sands Junior in the supernatural drama Being Human, he makes his girlfriend pregnant but just wants to be one of the boys. In the new TV whodunnit What Remains, Tovey’s Michael is again preparing, reluctantly, to be a father. He tends to play boy-men who find themselves in grown-up situations against their better judgment. He often gets the girl, but you’re never sure why, or whether he’ll keep her. There are few actors who exude such irrepressible down-the-pub blokeishness. Tovey is also one of Britain’s few out gay actors.

We meet at a park in London’s Soho. Tovey is accompanied by his gorgeous French bulldog, Rocky, or the Rock if you know him well. There’s something instantly likable about both of them. Rocky introduces himself by giving me a thorough face wash, and Tovey starts telling me why he didn’t join his parents’ coach company (they own the Gatwick Flyer, which runs between Essex and Gatwick airport), how he got into trouble at school time and again, and how his ambition as a nine-year-old was to be a father by the time he was 14.

Tovey grew up in Billericay, Essex, to parents who worked all hours to build their business. He had one of the highest IQs in his year at school, but applied himself only to things that interested him. He was easily bored, and liked to make people laugh. That’s how he got into trouble. He never did anything really bad, just daft or disrespectful – like the time he called his French teacher sweetheart. “I got escorted by the head of PE and a security guard to the office of the deputy headmistress, Mrs Palmer.” Mrs Palmer asked if he would call her sweetheart, and he said, only if he knew her better. Tovey was suspended for two days. His next suspension was for eating cake. Well, if we’re being pedantic, for following girls into the toilet after they had refused to give him some of the cake they had made in Home Economics, and stealing it from them. “I turned round with a mouth full of victoria sponge and there was Mrs Palmer.”

Then there was the time he was thrown out of Barking & Dagenham College. He left school at 16, was doing a BTec in performing arts, and was due to be in the chorus of the college production of Rent when he was offered a part in a commercial. “They said, if you take this we’re not going to invite you back, and also if you leave you’ll never work again. Anyway, I left.” The college now cites him as one of its famous former students.

Tovey says he spent one school holiday just watching movies, and that was that. “Dead Poets Society was a big one, Home Alone, Stand By Me, Labyrinth, things like that. I thought the films were brilliant, but more than anything I wanted to be a part of them rather than just watching.”

His first part was as an extra in The Bill in the last year of junior school. He played a traveller who shouted “Oi” and threw a football at a police officer. It wasn’t much but he loved it. He started making money while at school, but says nobody noticed because most of the children had loaded parents anyway. Tovey’s mother always warned him not to show off about his work, so he kept quiet. “Mum said, if people ask you about it, it’s fine, but don’t boast, don’t talk about anything. So it’s always felt very private, what I do. If you’ve seen me, great, and if you want to talk about something, brilliant, but I’m not going to come in and say, ‘Did you see me on this, what did you think?’ That’s just not in my nature… Oh my God! Look at that, he’s trying to hump you!” His voice rises a couple of notches in shock. “Rocky! Don’t do that! What’s wrong with you?” He gives Rocky a severe talking to, apologises on his behalf, then tells me it’s not easy being a French bulldog. “If you’re human and you feel sexed up, you can do something about it. But if you’re a dog I don’t think you can, can you?” He looks at Rocky’s underbelly. “Rocky can’t reach his,” he says sympathetically.

A holidaying Brazilian family walk over and ask what breed Rocky is. It’s funny, Tovey says when they’ve gone, he worried that Rocky might make him more recognisable, but it’s worked the other way – strangers approach him all the time, ask about the dog, have a few strokes and toddle off without so much as a hint of, “Aren’t you …?”

From 11 onwards, Tovey acted regularly in professional productions. But it was only in his early 20s that he made his name with Alan Bennett’s The History Boys, alongside Dominic Cooper and James Corden. Tovey was already out, and Bennett could happily have cast him as Posner, an angsty gay boy infatuated with one of his fellow students. But somehow it didn’t seem right; Tovey was always going to be more convincing as sporty, plain-speaking Rudge, who is given the brilliant line: “How do I define history? It’s just one fuckin’ thing after another.”

In fact, Tovey auditioned for Dakin, the handsome smoothie eventually played by Cooper, even though he knew he was unlikely to get the part. “I had loads of spots, but I went in and said, look, I want to play this part. Dakin was meant to be the lead, lothario, sex object, and nobody was going to lust after me, this spotty, pasty, big-eared thing. But Alan Bennett really liked me and he thought, well, he obviously wants a bigger part, so he wrote up the part of Rudge for me.” Tovey’s skin problem almost led to him quitting the production. “My skin was so bad, I thought, I just want to leave. It was really affecting me psychologically. You go into makeup and they’d paint each spot. It was self-esteem-crushing. Horrible.”

Tovey has perfect skin today, but he has had to work at it with medication. “I still feel I’m going to wake up any moment and my skin’s going to break out all over. If I get one spot now, this absolute cloud comes over me.”

Despite this, he was never exactly lacking in confidence.”I thought I could charm people. I never felt I was attractive to women. I felt I was attractive to men when I was growing up. And even now, if a woman fancies me, I find that a bit alienating. A bit like, ‘You’re sure you’re not taking the piss?’ Because, having the skin, it always felt, I don’t know, not good enough. Whereas with men it was a bit like, it’s rough, it’s fine, don’t worry. Do you know what I mean? Growing up having sticky-out ears, pasty skin, then going through teenage years with spots.” Did he consider having his ears pinned back? He looks appalled. “No. I’ve never felt anything apart from love for my ears. My eldest nephew’s got them now, and he’s so proud of them because he’s got his uncle Russell’s ears. They’re my trademark.”

At school he always had girlfriends. It was only when he got into his mid-teens that he realised they didn’t do that much for him, that he was attracted to boys. “Looking back, I always knew. But you don’t reallyknow till you get to a point where you go, oh, that’s what makes me happier.” At 18, he came out to his family and his father tried to talk him out of it. “My dad was of that generation where it’s changeable if you get it early enough.”

How would he have changed you?

“Hormone therapy or shock treatment, all of these horror things that you watch. You see, they had all this Aids thing. It was all, ‘Don’t die of ignorance.’ My nan thought being gay was a disease. It’s just a generational, educational thing. And Dad was like, ‘I wish you would have told us sooner because we would have done something about it.'”

Were you surprised by the reaction?

“No, I was prepared for it.”

Was it based on prejudice or fear?

“Not knowing. Not knowing anybody else who is gay, not experiencing it, hearing of people dying of Aids and seeing, say, Larry Grayson on TV and thinking, that’s it. Seeing gay men appear in stories in which they were miserable and sad. And I think he felt sad and worried for me, that I’d have a terrible life if I made this choice. And he thought it was a choice, because being straight is so natural, why would you want to be anything different from that?”

It’s touching how determined Tovey is to understand his family’s fears of his sexuality.

“You want your kids to be perfect and at that time it felt like it was an imperfection. Whereas now a lot of people are like [enthusiastic voice], ‘Are you? Cool! Well, make sure you look after yourself.’ It seems like it’s a different time. I sense that with younger generations, when they have after-school clubs where they talk about being gay. I meet a lot of kids who’ve come out at school, and I’m like, ‘What! You came out at school! Did you get bullied?’ ‘No!'”

He smiles. He’s just remembered something that amuses him. “My mum used to think it was the pill that made you gay. There was too much oestrogen in the water, and people started taking the pill in the 60s and it made everybody gay.”

On screen, Tovey is forever snogging girlfriends or flashing his bum. Does he enjoy his sex scenes? “I have quite enjoyed my sex scenes.” Hurrah! He’s the first actor I’ve ever heard admit that.

“I don’t get embarrassed by sexual parts. I want to protect the girl. Nine times out of 10, girls are more embarrassed.” He thinks about it. “You know what? Actually, if I was doing a gay sex scene, I’d probably feel really embarrassed.”

Do women playing his love interest see him as a challenge? “No, because most of my leading ladies are in relationships, and their partners are thrilled when I get cast with them in these intimate roles because I’m not a threat. I think if I’d been straight I would have slept with a lot of actresses by now and there’d be a lot of broken relationships.”

Really? He laughs. “Is that quite an egotistical thing to say? It’s just the leading man/leading lady thing, which happens again and again. You’re playing being in love and you fall in love.”

Tovey says he’s looking forward to his next part in What Remains because his character is a bit darker than normal. There’s also a new series of Him & Her coming up, which he loves. (“It feels very Pinteresque to me. If I wasn’t in it, I’d watch it religiously.”) And he’s busy writing: he’s written three plays so far, which have been read at the Soho theatre and National theatre studio but have yet to be performed. He describes them as being “about people in the margins”.

I ask Tovey if there was one thing he could change in the world, what it would be? “Right now? I feel, as a taxpayer who’s self-employed, I hate the fact that you have to pay on your projected earnings for the following year. Can’t we get rid of that? Let me earn it, then I’ll pay it back to you. Don’t say, well, you owe us half of what you might earn next year. That’s it. Haha!” Blimey, he sounds like a proper Tory Essex boy. “Tory? No, absolutely not. I was in the House of Lords recently for the whole debate about gay marriage. It was incredible, just sitting there watching all these really old white, middle-class, crusty men talking about how they thought it was wrong. They feel very removed from what is happening in the real world outside.”

It’s interesting that Tovey says it’s so much easier to come out today than when he was a boy. If anything, among actors, the opposite appears to be true. Whereas years ago the likes of Ian McKellen, Anthony Sher and Rupert Everett came out (admittedly in middle age or when already established), there are few openly gay stars of Tovey’s generation. “Well, there’s the guy who plays Spock in the new Star Trek film, Zachary Quinto.” He tries to think of others, but fails.

The fact that you can name only one gay actor in Hollywood suggests there is still a taboo, I say. What about well-known young British actors? He racks his brain. No, no one he can name – not publicly, anyway. “I assume there are a few. Whether they are out or not is not for me to say.” That is crazy, I say. “Well, I hope it’s changing… I’ve found out over the years that the conversation about casting me has come up: would it affect the show and the audience if I’m a gay man playing a straight character? These conversations are being had still.” Everett has said that coming out crippled his career, that now he’s largely restricted to playing gay. Perhaps the difference for Tovey is that he was out from the start, and because he didn’t make much fuss about it, nor did anybody else. As for the viewing public, he says they couldn’t care less. “You’ve got to remember that of the millions who watch TV, most people don’t give a fuck about your private life or know who you are.”

Tovey says he is keen to play a gay man, but there are very few good parts. “I really want to do it properly, with something that is clever and moving everything forward rather than covering old ground. Not someone who’s gay and miserable, dying of Aids, secluded, a bit weird. I want to play someone who’s normal and just happens to be gay.”

Shortly after I meet Tovey, the actor Ben Whishaw issues a statement saying he is gay and happily married. I contact Tovey to ask what he thinks. “I’m just happy he is a well-adjusted dude and out now, another good role model who isn’t defined professionally by who he wants to share his personal life with.”

Tovey has been with his boyfriend for four years. They live together, are very happy, and that’s all he wants to say because it’s private. He’s wearing a couple of rings. I ask about their history. The one on his middle finger, he says, is his father’s old ring and he never takes it off. And the other? He blushes. “It’s just another ring. It’s on that finger… which means something. I’m not married or anything. It’s just a symbol of commitment, I suppose.” Yes, he says, he would like to get married, and still fancies being a father.

Tovey says he always knew it was important for him to be open about his sexuality. Why? Simple, he says. “I love my personal life and having a social life. And I didn’t ever want to have to compromise. I could imagine being at this stage now and having skeletons in the closet, and you sitting here going, ‘So have you got a girlfriend?’ and me saying, ‘I’ve not got a girlfriend at the moment, I’ve not met the right girl, there’s a few people around.’ And in my head going, I’m going back home to my boyfriend in five minutes.” He pauses. “D’you know what I mean? I just can’t be arsed with that.”

The above “Guardian” article can also be accessed online here.