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Archive for November, 2015

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Michael Brandon

Michael Brandon
Michael Brandon

 

IMDB Overview:

Michael Brandon was born on April 20, 1945 in Brooklyn, New York, USA as Michael Feldman. He is an actor and director, known for Thomas & Friends (1984), Captain America: The First Avenger (2011) and Dempsey and Makepeace (1985). He has been married to Glynis Barber since November 18, 1989. They have one child. He was previously married to Lindsay Wagner.

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Mako

Mako
Mako

 

“Playbill” obituary from 2006:

Mako, the Japanese actor who was Tony Award nominated for playing the Reciter in the original Broadway production of Pacific Overtures, died July 21 at his home in Somis, in Ventura County, California, according to friends and colleagues.

He was known by his first name only, and used his mother’s surname Iwamatsu. In addition to his 1976 Best Actor (Musical) Tony nomination, the native of Kobe, Japan, was also Academy Award nominated for “The Sand Pebbles.”

He also starred in the title role in the 1992 Broadway play Shimada.

The cause death, according to wire reports, was esophageal cancer. Mako was 72 and is survived by his wife, Suzie, two daughters, Mimosa and Sala, and a sister Momo Yashima. Per his wishes, there will be no funeral or memorial service.

Mako moved to the United States to join his parents, who had emigrated there earlier, when he was 15. After his service in the U.S. military, he embarked upon a career in film and theatre, and studied at the Pasadena Community Playhouse in California.


Mako founded the Asian-American theatre company East West Players, in Los Angeles. Over the years, he directed, designed and acted in East West productions. Mako directed several plays at EWP in the past several years, and was to have made his stage return as an actor in Motty-chon by Perry Miyake on the occasion of EWP’s 40th Anniversary in May 2006. The production was cancelled in the third week of rehearsal as Mako had to start treatment immediately for his health condition.

As a teacher and acting icon, he was an inspiration to Asian-American actors.

“Personally, Mako helped open my eyes as a young artist just graduating from USC,” East West Players’ producing artistic director Tim Dang told Playbill.com. “He made me aware of the lack of opportunities in the industry and the valiant work that was ahead. He wanted to make sure that I was tough enough to survive in an industry where 80 percent of artists are unemployed and that percentage is even worse if you are an artist of color.”

Mako’s last public appearance for East West Players was on the occasion of its 40th Anniversary Gala on April 10, 2006 where he presented the Rae Creevey Award to Emily Kuroda and Alberto Isaac.

Dang added, “It’s a very sad time for East West Players but also for Asian American artists. We’ve lost many of our pioneers in the last few years. And Mako’s passing will affect us for a long time but I know that Mako would want us to keep the movement moving forward.

“With Mako’s passing, there is a great feeling of loss in the Asian Pacific artist community. We have lost a pioneer who helped pave the way for all of us trying to make a career in the arts and the entertainment industry. East West Players is deeply grateful for the passion, the artistry and the activism that Mako displayed over the many decades as artistic director, director and performer. If it wasn’t for Mako, none of us would be here.”

Mako’s film credits include “Memoirs of a Geisha,” “Conan the Barbarian,” “Seven Years in Tibet,” “Pearl Harbor,” “The Green Hornet,” “Rising Sun,” “The Ugly Dachshund” and more.

In “The Sand Pebbles,” for which he was Oscar nominated in the category of Best Supporting Actor, he played a submissive engineer, Po-Han. It was his first film (the Disney picture, “The Ugly Dachshund” was released the same year, 1966). Mako was also featured as a guest on many television shows, including “F Troop,” “Hawaii Five-0,” “Kung Fu” and “The West Wing.”

His sonorous performance in Pacific Overtures was captured on the original cast recording.

– See more at: http://www.playbill.com/news/article/mako-japanese-american-acting-icon-dead-at-72-133910#sthash.VeDndsJ3.dpuf

 

Tom Vallance’s “Independent” obituary:

The Japanese American actor Makoto Iwamatsu (usually billed simply as “Mako”) was a skilled performer who won nominations for both an Oscar and a Tony, and was equally renowned for the efforts he made to end stereotypical casting and treatment of Asian performers. In 1965 he co-founded the United States’ first Asian American theatre company, East West Players, housed initially in a church basement and now based in the Little Tokyo district of Los Angeles. He was, says the company’s current artistic director, Tim Dang, “sort of the godfather of Asian American theatre”.

Born in Japan in 1933, Mako was raised by grandparents after his mother and father moved to New York to study art. Because they settled on the East Coast, they were not interned during the Second World War, but given work in the US Office of War Information; later they were given residency. Mako joined them at the age of 15 and studied at the Pratt Institute in New York with plans to become an architect, but a friend’s request that he design the sets and lighting for an off-Broadway children’s play began a love of theatre. “That’s when the trouble began,” he said. “I was out of class so much that I lost my draft deferment.”

After two years’ military service, he moved to California, where he studied theatre at the Pasadena Playhouse, and in 1956 he became a naturalised citizen. He made his screen début with a bit role in Never So Few (1959), a Burma-set war film starring Frank Sinatra.

Shortly after founding East West Players, he was cast in Robert Wise’s impressive if overlong epic The Sand Pebbles (1966), starring Steve McQueen as a sailor assigned to a US Navy gunboat patrolling the Yangtze River in 1926. Put in charge of an engine room manned by Chinese workers, he alienates the crew by dismissing the Chinese, who are doing all the on-board duties while the American sailors live a life of ease. McQueen retains just one Chinaman, Po-han, played by Mako, whom he befriends. He later teaches Mako boxing tricks that enable him to win a fight against a brawny American sailor in order to defend the honour of a Chinese girl forced to work in a brothel.

In some respects, Mako’s role was the sort he was campaigning against, that of a subservient Chinese “coolie” who spoke pidgin English, called his bosses “master”, and expired heroically, but he brought warmth and dignity to the role and was deservedly nominated for the Academy Award.

George Takei, who played “Sulu” in Star Trek, said, “He was one of the early truly trained actors who was able to take stock roles, roles seen many times before, and make an individual a live and vibrant character.”

Mako’s role as the Reciter in Pacific Overtures (1976) displayed that vibrancy to Broadway audiences, who responded rapturously to his star performance. The musical, with libretto by John Weidman and an ambitious score by Stephen Sondheim built around a quasi-Japanese pentatonic scale, examined the events surrounding the opening of Japan to the West in 1853 due to the threatening presence of Commodore Perry’s four American warships. Told from a Japanese point of view and employing an all-Asian cast, it used devices from Kabuki theatre, including having the women’s parts played by men, with the whole linked by the Reciter (Mako) who presides over, takes part in, and comments throughout the show.

Mako’s charisma and authority largely inspired the word of mouth that kept the show, not a hit, running for six months, though he offered to leave during rehearsals when he despaired of ever mastering his demanding opening number, “The Advantages of Floating in the Middle of the Sea”. “It was particularly hard for him because he was an immigrant,” said Takei. “There was the linguistic challenge.”

The show’s original cast album displays Mako’s mastery of that difficulty – he even at one point has to mimic some of the British admiral’s Gilbertian patter: “The man has come with letters from Her Majesty Victoria, as well as little gifts from Britain’s various emporia.” He also took part in the number that Sondheim has declared his personal favourite of all his songs, “Someone in a Tree”, in which a Japanese warrior, an old man, and the man’s childhood self describe the negotiations at the historic treaty-house meeting between the Japanese and Americans.

Mako’s performance won him a Tony nomination as best actor in a musical, though he lost to George Rose as Doolittle in a revival of My Fair Lady.

As artistic director of East West Players, he trained not only generations of actors but also playwrights (“Unless our story is told to other people, it’s hard for them to understand where we are”) and he staged plays by Shakespeare and Chekhov as well as contemporary works. In 1981, when national discussions were about to start on the subject of reparation for Japanese Americans interned during the Second World War, Mako devoted the whole season to works on the subject. Takei, who helped with funding during the group’s earlier days, said,

In part the Asian American community still had the immigrant values of encouraging their children to go into medicine, law, engineering. They were not only not supporting their children who evidenced talent in performing arts, but outright discouraging them. East West Players gave those youngsters an opportunity to practise their craft, but at the same time developed an audience that supported our performers.

Mako appeared on screen as the Wizard with Arnold Schwarzenegger in Conan the Barbarian (1982) and its sequel Conan the Destroyer (1984), and he was a Singaporean in Seven Years in Tibet (1997) with Brad Pitt. In Pearl Harbor (2001) he was Admiral Yamamoto, and in 2005 he had a cameo role in Memoirs of a Geisha.

He also lent his distinctively raspy voice to animated features, particularly on television – he was the evil demon Aku in the animated series Samurai Jack, also enacting a parody of that character, called Achoo, in Duck Dodgers, and he was the voice of Uncle Iroh in Avatar: The Last Airbender. Prolific acting work on television included guest spots in I Spy, Fantasy Island, M*A*S*H, Quincy and Frasier.

Last year he was a guest star on an episode of The West Wing entitled “A Good Day”, in which he played an economics professor and former rival of President Bartlet. Before his death from cancer, he had been announced to provide the voice of Splinter in the newest Teenage Mutant Turtles film.

In 1989 differences with the board of directors caused Mako to break with East West Players, though in the months before his death he was preparing to appear with his wife, actress Shizuko Hoshi, in one of their productions. “Of course,” said Mako to the Los Angeles Times in 1986, “we’ve been fighting stereotypes from day one at East West. That’s the reason we formed: to combat that and to show we are capable of more than just filling the stereotypes – waiter, laundryman, gardener, martial artist, villain.”

Tom Vallance

 

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Robert Carradine

Robert Carradine
Robert Carradine

 

Robert Carradine was born on March 24, 1954 in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California, USA as Robert Reed Carradine. He is an actor and producer, known for Django Unchained (2012), Revenge of the Nerds (1984) and Lizzie McGuire (2001). He has been married to Edie Mani since January 7, 1990. They have two children.

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Deborah Walley

James Darren, Deborah Walley, Michael Callan
James Darren, Deborah Walley, Michael Callan

 

“Telegraph” obituary from May 2001:

DEBORAH WALLEY, the actress, who has died in Arizona aged 57, became the envy of millions of women when she appeared in Spinout (1966) with Elvis Presley and subsequently became romantically involved with him.

In the 1960s Deborah Walley was established as a Hollywood starlet when she appeared in a number of beach party films – which generally featured bikini-clad girls dancing half-heartedly to bland pop tunes. With her charming elfin looks she became a popular box office attraction and she was an obvious choice as the love interest in one of Presley’s films.

Her character in Spinout was a rather androgynous girl drummer in Elvis’s band who, as was traditional in such pictures, harboured a secret crush on the singer. Off screen there was some romance between the two, although Deborah Walley always stressed the innocence of their relationship. “Elvis would take me out on the back of his motorbike,” she recalled, “and we kissed a lot early on, but that made way for serious conversation. We became lifelong friends.”

Deborah Walley was born on Aug 12 1943 at Bridgeport, Connecticut, the daughter of Nathan and Edith Walley, who were champion ice skaters and choreographers. Her childhood was spent on the road with her parents, and she made her first public appearance aged three on the ice to a packed house at Madison Square Gardens. However, by the time she was a teenager, Deborah had decided to opt for a career on the stage. “I simply hated the ice and cold,” she later recalled, “thankfully, my folks were understanding.”

After studying at the Academy of Dramatic Arts in New York, she made her stage debut at 15 and appeared in many early television commercials. But it was while she was playing Irina in Chekov’s The Three Sisters that she was discovered by Columbia Pictures and taken to Hollywood.

In her first film, Gidget Goes Hawaiian (1961), Walley was an overnight sensation. Over the next four years she appeared in a number of films before being cast in Beach Blanket Bingo (1965) starring Frankie Avalon. It was the most successful and critically acclaimed of the beach party films and established her as a beach movie regular. She went on to star in Dr Goldfoot in the Bikini Machine (1965), Ghost in the Invisible Bikini (1966) and It’s a Bikini World (1967).

Television producers also recognised her appeal and she made appearances in a number of popular television shows of the time including Route 66, Naked City, Playhouse 90 and Wagon Train. In the last she played the part of Sally, a mischievous teenager who gets a spanking from John McIntyre.

Starring opposite Elvis Presley established her cult following and by the time Spinout was released she was receiving 5,000 fan letters a month. However, after she appeared in The Bubble – a film about a young couple who find themselves trapped inside in a seemingly deserted town enclosed in a giant bubble – film offers dried up.

“Directors thought I only acted on a beach,” she later commented, “they had no idea that I could really act!” Her only big screen role in the 1970s was in Benji (1974), the popular family film about a lovable dog and his owners. She continued to work on television, however, appearing in The Hardy Boys and, ironically, in an episode of Baywatch.

She was an active campaigner for environmental issues and a co-founder of the Swiftwind Theatre Company, which helps to train North American Indians to act, write and direct for the screen.

Although, towards the end of her life, illness prevented her from working, Walley remained cheerful. “I’ve known some wonderful people,” she said this year, “and I’ve dated Elvis. What a marvellous life.”

She married John Ashley in 1961 (dissolved 1966). They had three sons.

Rhe above “Telegraph” obituary can also be accessed online here.

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Michael Callan

James Darren, Deborah Walley, Michael Callan
James Darren, Deborah Walley, Michael Callan
Michael Callan
Michael Callan

 

IMDB Entry:

Actor, singer and dancer Michael Callan started life out as Martin Harris Calinieff in Philadelphia on November 22, 1935. A dark-haired charmer, he was taking voice and dance lessons by age 11, with the intentions of becoming the next Gene Kelly. He had the dark, smirking, surly good looks and confident swagger that fit in with the James Dean 50s rebel-like era. He began his professional career as a comic and dancer in Philly night clubs while billing himself as “Mickey Calin”. Eventually, he entertained at such hot spots as the Copacabana and in Las Vegas showrooms.

His move to New York was a wise choice. Given a dancing part in his first Broadway show, “The Boyfriend” (1954), starring Julie Andrews, he followed it with another musical, “Catch a Star” (1955). This, in turn, led to his biggest break of all, the role of “Riff” in the original New York production of “West Side Story” (1957). While the show made virtual theater stars out of its leads Carol Lawrence and Larry Kert, Michael, on the other hand, attracted the interest of Columbia Pictures.

His film career began engagingly enough — not as a singer or dancer, but as a dramatic leading man. Columbia placed him in two fairly strong films in the hopes of promoting and developing his obvious teen-idol promise. The first film was a western soap opera in support of Gary Cooper and Rita Hayworth. In They Came to Cordura (1959), Michael co-starred in this film alongside another male dreamboat, Tab Hunter. His second film was a “B”-level starring role in The Flying Fontaines (1959), in which he plays a circus Romeo whose caddish cavortings under the “big top” accelerate the melodramatic story line. This role pretty much set the tone for what, more or less, would become his screen image — a notorious womanizer and charming, though sometimes, spineless opportunist. His lovely co-star in the movie, Evy Norlund, was a formerly-crowned Miss Denmark (1958). This movie was her only one, since she abruptly gave up her young aspirations when she married singer James Darren and raise a big family.

One of Michael’s biggest disappointments, during this time, was losing the role of “Riff” in the film version of West Side Story (1961), due to contractual restrictions with Columbia. Russ Tamblyn received the honors and the glory. But he did continue to rack up callow, trouble-making co-leads in youth-oriented films, paired up with Hollywood’s loveliest of newcomers, including Tuesday Weld in Because They’re Young (1960),Dolores Dorn in 13 West Street (1962) and Deborah Walley in both Gidget Goes Hawaiian (1961) and Bon Voyage! (1962). In The Interns (1962), he continued to perpetuate his slick image as a roving medical resident who juggles gorgeous Anne Helm and Katharine Bard for his own selfish purposes. In the sequel of sorts, The New Interns (1964), he made his customary moves on Barbara Eden (I Dream of Jeannie(1965)) and Dawn Wells) (“Mary Ann” on Gilligan’s Island (1964)).

Although he managed to show off his dancing skills in Pepe (1960) and in the afore-mentioned “Gidget” film, Michael never capitalized on it. The era of the movie musicals was in a backslide at the time and he focused completely on acting. He was among the international cast of the war epic, The Victors (1963), and was the best-looking marooned member in the British-made Jules Verne fantasy-adventure, Mysterious Island (1961). Interestingly, his last films of real note were in comedies — oppositeJane Fonda, in the freewheeling cult western, Cat Ballou (1965), and a scene-stealingLionel Jeffries in the British satire, You Must Be Joking! (1965). Perhaps his characters were too unsympathetic for their own good; for whatever reason, Michael never managed to hit the cinematic “bad boy” stardom he seemed geared up for.

In the late 60s, he found a venue better-suited for his talents — TV sitcoms. His skirt-chasing characters seemed to have more appeal when played lightly for laughs. His best chance came in the form of Occasional Wife (1966). An ideal showcase, Michael played the lead role of “Peter Christopher”, an up-and-coming executive of a company that strongly pushes the husband/father image. Perennial playboy Callan decides to take on an “occasional wife” (Patricia Harty) for appearances’ sake while trying to conceal his wily ways from the workplace. The show fit Callan like a glove and he and Harty displayed great chemistry, so much so that they married in real-life during the series’ run. Perhaps the true-life marriage ruined the show’s illusion, as the series limped away after only one season. Patricia, the second of Michael’s three wives, divorced him a few years later.

Surprisingly, Michael never starred in another sitcom that got off the ground. He ventured on finding guest appearances on such sitcoms as That Girl (1966), Hazel(1961) and Mary Tyler Moore (1970) and became a favorite player in the extremely popular Love, American Style (1969) sketches, playing (what else?) guys with girl troubles. His TV career eventually took the Fantasy Island (1977), The Love Boat (1977) and Murder, She Wrote (1984) route and, in an effort to jumpstart things, both produced and starred in his own film, Double Exposure (1983), but to little notice. He also returned, occasionally, to the stage in both legit plays and musicals to keep his name alive, including “Absurd Person Singular” and “The Music Man”.

The father of two daughters (from his first marriage), he has been glimpsed only here and there, since the mid-90s. Recent movie credits include Stuck on You (2003) andThe Still Life (2006). He’s also been spotted, occasionally, at various signings and conventions. While perhaps not climbing the height of heights expected, Michael reached an enviable plateau and merits strong attention for his fine contributions to 60s and 70s film and TV.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Gary Brumburgh / gr-home@pacbell.net

The above IMDB entry can also be accessed online here.

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Dean Stockwell

Dean Stockwell
Dean Stockwell

 

TCM Overview:

The career of this prolific performer has come in several waves, each punctuated by a “retirement” from the screen. As a child actor under contract to MGM from 1945, Dean Stockwell charmed in “Anchors Aweigh” (1945), then specialized in “sensitive child” roles, such as Gregory Peck’s son in “Gentleman’s Agreement” (1947), who suffers the slings of anti-Semitism when his father decides to pose as a Jew to do a magazine article, and in the title character of Joseph Losey’s “The Boy with Green Hair” (1948), which delved into a similar milieu of how people treat a stranger. After five years spent traveling around the USA and working at odd jobs, he matured into a strikingly attractive, introverted young adult lead, winning acclaim as the character based on Nathan Leopold in “Compulsion” first on stage (1957) and later the feature (1959). Stockwell also won acclaim for two characters that functioned as authorial stand-ins, Paul Morrel in Jack Cardiff filming of D.H. Lawrence’s “Sons and Lovers” (1960) and Edmund Tyrone in Sidney Lumet’s version of Eugene O’Neill’s “Long Day’s Journey Into Night” (1962)

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Peter Lawford

Peter Lawford

 

 

TCM Overview:

A dashing and handsome English-American actor, Peter Lawford enjoyed a brief stint as a matinee idol in the 1940s before becoming better known as an in-law of the Kennedys and a member of “The Rat Pack” during the 1960s. Benefitting greatly from the dearth of handsome male talent in Hollywood during World War II, Lawford gained notice for appearances in such films as “The Picture of Dorian Gray” (1945) and “Son of Lassie” (1945). More roles followed throughout the 1950s, although it was his marriage to Patricia Kennedy – sister of John and Robert Kennedy – as well as his association with Frank Sinatra’s iconic cadre of carousers that brought Lawford lasting fame. Years after JFK’s assassination, rumors about Lawford’s scandalous adventures with the president, his being the last person to speak to a despondent Marilyn Monroe before her tragic death, and a bitter falling out with Sinatra, became the stuff of legend. Less glamorous was Lawford’s decline in the film industry, several failed marriages, and chronic alcoholism. With the halcyon years of “Ocean’s Eleven” (1960) far behind him, the aging actor made due with the occasional film role and guest turns on such TV fare as “The Doris Day Show” (CBS, 1968-1973) and “Fantasy Island” (ABC, 1977-1984). A bit player in a fascinating chapter of American pop-culture, Lawford would most likely be remembered less for his acting credentials than for the legacy encapsulated in author James Spada’s unofficial biography, Peter Lawford: The Man Who Kept the Secrets.

The above TCM overview can also be accessed online here.

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Robert Alda

Robert Alda
Robert Alda

 

TCM Overview:

 Darkly handsome lead, later an attractively graying character actor, a veteran performer in film, theatre and TV. Alda made his film debut as George Gershwin in the tuneful biopic “Rhapsody in Blue” (1945) and played the romantic lead in Robert Florey’s stylish cult horror thriller, “The Beast with Five Fingers” (1947). His film career diminished in the 1950s, but Alda played occasional character roles such as Lana Turner’s lecherous agent in “Imitation of Life” (1959). He also enjoyed notable success onstage beginning with his Tony-winning performance in the landmark musical “Guys and Dolls” (1950). In the 60s Alda lived in Italy and made a number of films there. TV also kept him busy in games shows and the adventure series “Secret File, U.S.A.” during the early 50s; he later performed on the soaps “Love of Life” and “Secret Storm” and contributed a memorable guest performance as a general who cracks up on “M*A*S*H”, starring his son Alan Alda.

“Los Angeles Times” obituary:

Actor Robert Alda–who scored successes as George Gershwin on film, as Sky Masterson on stage and as “M*A*S*H” star Alan Alda’s father in private life–died Saturday at his Los Angeles home after a long illness.   He was 72, and friends said he had never entirely recovered from the effects of a stroke he suffered two years ago.   “But until he got sick, he was always working,” Alda’s longtime friend and agent Lew Sherrell said Sunday. “He was a beloved man in the entertainment industry–and a very good father. There was great love between him and (younger son) Antony and Alan.”

Actress Vivian Blaine, his co-star in the Broadway musical “Guys and Dolls,” said news of Alda’s death came as “Gloom, doom and disaster. He was a good friend, we worked together after “Guys and Dolls” and were good friends–I loved him, most people did. It’s a major loss and a dreary day.”   In addition to his sons, Robert Alda leaves his wife, Italian actress Flora Marino; a sister, Anne Ciaffone; a brother, Vincent D’Abruzzo, and four grandchildren. Funeral services in Los Angeles will be private.

Born Feb. 26, 1914, in New York City, Alphonso Giuseppe Giovanni Roberto D’Abruzzo was the son of a barber and studied architecture at College of the City of New York before entering show business.   “I was paid $24.50 a week to work as a draftsman on plans for what finally became Radio City,” he later recalled, “and there was a singing contest at a theater called the Academy of Music. I entered–I don’t know why, maybe because I’m Italian–and I won!   “Well, the prize was $25. Fifty cents more than I made in a week. And I said, ‘This is for me . . .!”

Alda broke into professional ranks as a singer, performing in Borscht Belt resorts of the Catskills and as a singing straight man in the burlesque of the late 1930s. He also worked regularly in radio and appeared with dramatic stock companies. But his first major notice came when he was signed by Warner Bros. for the leading role of George Gershwin in “Rhapsody in Blue.”   The film–and Alda–were a critical and box office success.   But there were problems:   “We made the picture in 1943,” Alda said, “but it wasn’t released until 1945, and in between, Warners wanted to ‘keep me under wraps’ so I was told to twiddle my thumbs. I almost went crazy. . . .”   The inactivity soured him on movies, and though he made others under his contract–“Cinderella Jones,” “Cloak and Dagger,” “Nora Prentiss,” “April Showers” and Alda’s cult favorite, “The Beast With Five Fingers”–he fled to New York as soon as possible, where he scored a major Broadway success with the starring role of Sky Masterson in the musical “Guys and Dolls.”

He also scored stage successes with “Harbor Lights,” “My Daughter, Your Son,” “The Front Page” and “What Makes Sammy Run?”   Son Alan Alda, by first wife, actress Joan Browne, began his own career doing Abbott and Costello routines opposite his father at the old Hollywood Canteen, and then the two appeared together on stage in Rome and on television in Amsterdam.   “It was the best year of my education,” Alan Alda recalled.   “It was great,” his father agreed. But all the same, he insisted that the budding actor finish college at Fordham before turning professional.  “So, when he graduated–he was ready. Wow, was he ready . . .!” Robert Alda laughed.

During the ’50s, Robert Alda appeared in an early television series, “Secret File: U.S.A.,” shot in Amsterdam, and moved to Italy, where he starred in a stage musical and made a score of films including “Beautiful but Dangerous” with Gina Lollabrigida, “Cleopatra’s Daughter,” “Toto e Peppino divisi a Berlino” and “The Serpent.”   Returning to the United States, he starred in the short-lived television series “Supertrain,” had a major role in the daytime television serial “Days of Our Lives,” had roles in such films as “Imitation of Life,” “I Will, I Will . . . for Now,” and “Bittersweet Love,” appeared with son Alan in segments of “M*A*S*H” and wrote a cookbook, “100 Ways to Cook Pasta,” with his wife.

The above “Los Angeles Times” obituary can also be accessed online here.

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Christian Cooke

Christian Cooke
Christian Cooke
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Jacques Charrier

Jacques Charrier
Jacques Charrier

 

Jacques Charrier (born 6 November 1936 in Metz) is a French actor. He was married to Brigitte Bardot from 1959 to 1962.