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Jerry Desmonde

Jerry Desmonde
Jerry Desmonde
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Denise Gough

Denise Gough
Denise Gough
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Christopher Lee

Christopher Lee
Christopher Lee
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Bernard Archard

 

 

 

 

Bernard Archard
Bernard Archard

 

“Guardian” obituary:

The actor Bernard Archard, who has died aged 91, established a forbidding presence as Lt Col Oreste Pinto, a character based on a real-life wartime counter-espionage interrogator, in the BBC television series Spycatcher (1959-61). Tall and angular, with receding hair and a prominent chin, he became a regular authority figure and inquisitor, though not in leading roles.   Archard was born in Fulham, London, where his parents were mayor and mayoress; his father was also a jeweller. He won a scholarship to Rada (1938-39), and an early stage role came as Orsino to Jessica Tandy’s Viola in Twelfth Night at the Regent’s Park open air theatre.

During the second world war, he was a conscientious objector, and was sent to work on land owned by the Quaker movement. At the Edinburgh Festival in 1948, in a production of the Glyndebourne Children’s Theatre, he met fellow actor James Belchamber, who was his partner for nearly 60 years.ore   Making his way around regional repertory, Archard worked at Chesterfield with Margaret Tyzack and at Sheffield with Paul Eddington, Peter Sallis and Patrick McGoohan; like many, he believed McGoohan to be a truly great actor, and they worked together again in a couple of episodes of McGoohan’s 1960s TV series Danger Man.   In the mid-1950s, Archard and Belchamber ran a touring repertory company, based in Torquay, with Hilda Braid among its players. They also collaborated on the book and lyrics for Our Jack, a musical based on Walter Greenwood’s The Cure For Love, in 1960.

Nevertheless, by 1959 Archard was thinking about emigrating to Canada with Belchamber. He postponed his trip to appear in a TV medical drama, then again to do Treason (1959), a Sunday-night play about the July 1944 plot to kill Hitler. Unknown to him, this rush of work resulted from a plan by writer-producer Elwyn Jones to demonstrate his suitability for Spycatcher.

Masterminded by Robert Barr, Spycatcher was also produced in the documentary manner, to the extent that Archard was not given billing in the Radio Times until some time into the run. Unlike later, action-orientated spy series, Pinto’s half-hour cases, sometimes little more than two-handers, were based on true stories. The debriefing of wartime refugees afforded many opportunities for Archard’s incisive qualities. One episode saw him get the desired answers from a suspect by throwing darts at a photo of Hitler.

Running for three seasons, the series brought Archard much recognition; he was wryly amused about receiving “two direct offers of marriage and about a dozen oblique ones”. Athough half of the episodes still exist, it has never been revived. Nonetheless, when on a continental tour of My Fair Lady in 1983, Archard’s presence in Amsterdam caused excitement – Pinto having been Dutch.

He was proud of his role as a magistrate in Terence Rattigan’s last play, Cause Celebre, in the West End in 1977, with Glynis Johns. Anthony Shaffer’s mocking The Case of the Oily Levantine, at the same venue, Her Majesty’s Theatre, two years later, was less successful. However, a full-scale theatrical disaster came with Peter O’Toole’s Macbeth at the Old Vic in 1980. Archard played Duncan; he had previously been Angus in Roman Polanski’s film version, in 1971.

In the film version of Dad’s Army (1971), Archard was a regular general dismissing Captain Mainwaring as a “damn bank clerk!” He was in several of the popular Edgar Wallace B-movies, as well as John Huston’s playful The List of Adrian Messenger (1963); he and Huston had a mutual friend in Deborah Kerr.

He was the Duke of Wellington in Number 10 (YTV, 1983), an anthology series depicting prime ministers. For publicity purposes, the actors who took the roles were photographed with Margaret Thatcher; Archard was not impressed by her, but then, he had been a lifelong reader of this paper. He also played a government figure in Hidden Agenda (1990), Ken Loach’s controversial film derived from the John Stalker inquiry.

After retiring in his early 80s, Archard lived contentedly in Somerset with Belchamber, who survives him.

· Bernard Joseph Archard, actor, born August 20 1916; died May 1 2008

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Avis Bunnage

Avis Bunnage
Avis BunnWikipedia entry:

Avis Bunnage (22 April 1923, Ardwick, Manchester, Lancashire – 4 October 1990, Thorpe Bay, Southend-on-Sea, Essex) was an English actress of film, stage and television.[1]

She attended Manley Park Municipal School and Chorlton Central School in Manchester. She worked as a secretary and a nursery teacher before deciding to become an actress. She gained stage experience in rep and made her first professional appearance at Chorlton Rep Theatre in Manchester in 1947. She appeared as Veronica, the wife of Rigsby, in Rising Damp, for one episode, and as Amy Jenkinson, Ivy Unsworth’s friend, in 11 episodes of In Loving Memory. Bunnage was a member of Joan Littlewood‘s Theatre Workshop company at the Theatre Royal Stratford East. There she created the role of Helen, the mother in A Taste of Honey, her first West End role when the play transferred to Wyndham’s Theatre, and also a role in Oh, What a Lovely War! at Stratford East, which also transferred to Wyndham’s Theatre. When Avis was on holiday from this production for two weeks, her role was taken over by Danny La Rue. Among her other roles for Theatre Workshop were Mrs. Lovitt in Christopher Bond‘s play Sweeney Todd (the basis for the Sondheim musical), and the title role in a play about the music hall legend Marie Lloyd. In the early years of Coronation Street she played Lucile Hewitt’s auntie. She was in the musical Billy at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, playing the mother of ‘Billy Liar‘. She played Golda inFiddler on the Roof, opposite Alfie Bass, at Her Majesty’s Theatre in London.

Among her various film roles were several British New Wave productions, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning and The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner.

Married to Derek Orchard, she died on 4 October 1990 in Thorpe Bay, Southend-on-Sea, Essex, aged 67.

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Murray Head

Murray Head
Murray Head

 

Murray Seafield Saint-George Head (born 5 March 1946)[1] is an English actor and singer, most recognised for his international hit songs “Superstar” (from the 1970 rock opera Jesus Christ Superstar) and “One Night in Bangkok” (the 1985 single from the musical Chess, which topped the charts in various countries), and for his 1975 album Say It Ain’t So. He has been involved in several projects since the 1960s and continues to record music, perform concerts and make appearances on television either as himself or as a character actor.   Among his movies are “The Family Way” on 1966 and “Sunday Bloody Sunday” in 1970.

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Donald Churchill

Donald Churchill
Donald Churchill

 

Donald Churchill was born on November 6, 1930 in Southall, Middlesex, England. He was an actor and writer, known for It’s Not Me: It’s Them! (1965), Zeppelin (1971) and The Hound of the Baskervilles (1983). He was married to Pauline Yates. He died on October 29, 1991 in Fuengirola, Spain.

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Penelope Wilton

Penelope Wilton
Penelope Wilton

 

Penelope Wilton was born on June 3, 1946 in Scarborough, North Yorkshire, England as Penelope Alice Wilton. She is an actress, known for Match Point (2005), The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel (2011) and Shaun of the Dead (2004). She was previously married to Ian Holm and Daniel Massey.    Penelope Wilton enjoyed enormous success in the TV series “Downton Abbey”,    She was made a Dame in the New Yer’s Honours List 2016.

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Bruno Langley

Bruno Langley
Bruno Langley

 

Wikipedia” entry:

Bruno Langley (born 21 March 1983) is a British actor best known for playing Adam Mitchell in the 2005 series of Doctor Who and Todd Grimshaw in Coronation Street.

Langley was born to Australian parents in Somerset, but grew up in Buxton, Derbyshire.[ He attended Harpur Hill Primary School and Buxton Community School. He trained at the North Cheshire Theatre School[ in Heaton Moor. Along with his sisters he was a member of a number of junior string orchestras in which he played the cello.

From 2001 to 2004, Langley played the character of Todd Grimshaw in the ITV soap opera Coronation Street. As the first openly gay character on the show, Langley developed a large gay following.   He also appeared in Coronation Street on 4 August 2000 as Danny, then boyfriend of Candice.

Since leaving Coronation Street, he has played roles such as the part of Adam Mitchell in the 2005 series of Doctor Who with Christopher Eccleston and Billie Piper, appearing in two episodes, “Dalek” and “The Long Game“, and provided an audio commentary for the DVD of these episodes.[5] He also filmed a small role in the feature film The League of Gentlemen’s Apocalypse,[6] released in June 2005, as well an episode of Dalziel and Pascoe[7] and the little-seen film Halal Harry in 2006, and read Horace for BBC Radio 7.

He returned to Coronation Street for a twelve episode guest stint in 2007]

In April 2011 Langley returned to Coronation Street for a one episode appearance.[

In June 2013 it was announced that Langley was returning to Coronation Street as a regular character.Todd Grimshaw returned in the episodes screened on Monday, 4 November.

In the summer of 2005, Langley made his stage debut in an acclaimed run of Romeo and Juliet opposite fellow ex-soap actress Scarlett Alice Johnson at Stafford Castle. Taking on the role of Romeo, The British Theatre Guide described Langley as, ‘immediately comfortable with the verse, finding no difficulty in being the lovesick youngster before he’s gripped with passion for Juliet. Later he convincingly shows a tantrum-like immaturity at his banishment.’

On 30 October 2005, he appeared on stage at the Old Vic in London in the one-night-only play Night Sky with Christopher Eccleston, Navin Chowdhry, David Warner, Saffron Burrows and David Baddiel.

In the spring of 2006, Langley appeared in Life Imitates Art at the Camden People’s Theatre, Camden.[   Also in 2006 he was seen in a production of A Taste of Honey, taking on the role of repressed gay art student, Geoffrey. In his role as Geoffrey, Langley was described as, ‘quietly impressive, poignantly conveying Geoffrey’s unending loyalty with ease.’[14] The production toured the UK extensively and played a short run at the Richmond Theatre.

Beginning in May 2008, he appeared in the premiere stage run of the new musical Sleeping Beauty starring opposite fellow Coronation Street alumna Lucy Evans at the Gaiety Theatre in Dublin.

Langley also appeared in the stage show Flashdance the Musical.[16] with Victoria Hamilton-Barritt, Bernie Nolan and Noel Sullivan. Langley received positive reviews for his role as Jimmy Kaminsky, with What’s On Stage stating, ‘Bruno Langley also fares well as Jimmy, particularly when he has the chance to showcase his fine voice in the second act.’ [17] and Lindsay Corr stating in the Edinburgh Guide that, ‘Bruno Langley as Jimmy shows acting doesn’t have to take a back seat in musical theatre, as he twitches about the stage in his grey hoodie and delivers his number, ‘You Can’t Keep Me Down’, with understated aplomb.’

In 2010-11 he joined the tour of Calendar Girls,[19] in the role of the young photographer, Lawrence. In reviewing the Liverpool Empire Theatre production of the show, Liverpool Sound and Vision said Langley, ‘gave outstanding moments of beautiful comic timing as young photographer Lawrence that it’s no wonder he was asked back to reprise his role from last year.’

In November 2012 he began playing Giles Ralston in the 60th anniversary tour of The Mousetrap by Agatha Christie.[21]

Langley played the cello until the age of 16 when he decided to pursue a career as an actor. In addition, he plays the piano. In 2010 he formed a band, Bruno Langley and the Wonderland Band. In a 2011 interview with Dianne Bourne of the Manchester Evening News, he stated, “I’ve been acting on and off ever since the age of 17, but always in between jobs I’d sit at the piano and write songs, and sing different songs. A year and a half ago I got a band together, we had a few rehearsals, I had fun doing it and it’s gone from there really.” The band performs songs from the 1950s as well as taking modern tracks and arranging them into jazz, blues and swing styles. Langley has stated he does the arrangements himself.

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Connor McIntyre

Connor McIntyre
Connor McIntyre

Connor McIntyre was born in Toxteth, Liverpool, Merseyside, England. He is an actor, known for Coronation Street (1960), Pu-239 (2006) and Visiting Hour (2014).