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Pablito Calvo

Pablito Calvo
Pablito Calvo

Pablito Calvo (real name Pablo Calvo Hidalgo) (16 March 1948 – 1 February 2000) was a Spanish child actor. After the international success of Marcelino, pan y vino, where he won a Cannes Film Festival award (1955), he became Spain’s most famous child actor. He did five more films, even in Italy, with Totò.

Retired from acting at the age of 16 to become an industrial engineer later, he worked in tourism and promoting buildings in Torrevieja.

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Christian Marquand

Christian Marquand
Christian Marquand

Ronald Bergan’s “Guardian” obituary from 2000:

There must have been worse ways of earning a living than passionately making love to the 22-year-old Brigitte Bardot on the beach of St Tropez. Christian Marquand, who has died aged 73, was a lucky man.The film was And God Created Woman (1956), and the steamy scene was directed watchfully by Bardot’s husband, Roger Vadim. Mostly shot on location, the rather silly, but certainly sensual, tale was a good excuse for him to display his wife’s amoral charms in various forms of dress, which mainly comprised jeans, and undress.

But the film also gave Marquand’s career a boost. Vadim’s debut movie tells of how Bardot, shortly after her marriage to a wimpish Jean-Louis Trintignant, finds she is more attractive to her dour but handsome brother-in-law, Marquand. Coincidentally in real life, Trintignant was to marry Marquand’s sister, Nadine, a few years later. But back on the beach, Bardot teases Marquand into ripping off her clothes and taking her.

The film created a scandal in France. This was mainly because of the discreet nudity of the beach scene, but Vadim complained that the censors forced him to cut the sequence.

Marquand himself was no stranger to scandal. The previous year he had a role in Marc Allègret’s Lady Chatterly’s Lover, which had starred Danielle Darrieux as the erring English aristocrat. In his private life, he married Tina, the daughter of Jean-Pierre Aumont and Maria Montez, in 1963, then had a son by the actress Dominique Sanda in the early 1970s. Thus he seemed to reflect his adulterous film persona.

One of his best pictures was Alexandre Astruc’s Une Vie (1958), based on a Guy de Maupassant story. In it, Marquand was the womanising husband of a young, innocent aristocrat, played by a cloying Maria Schell.

His affair with a friend’s wife (beautiful Antonella Lualdi) leads to his death. The main strength of the film, apart from Claude Renoir’s wonderful impressionistic Technicolor photography, was the way in which Marquand managed to find many nuances in the unsympathetic character he played.

Marquand was born in Marseilles, the son of a Spanish father and an Arab mother; the fact that he spoke Spanish, Arabic, French, English and Italian – all learned as a child – aided his international career. At the age of 21, his dark good looks got him a bit part in Jean Cocteau’s Beauty And The Beast (1946), and he was soon getting slightly bigger roles, such as the Bohemian officer friend of the caddish soldier hero (Farley Granger) in Luchino Visconti’s lush melodrama, Senso (1954).

In the 1960s, he moved with ease between films made in France and those coming out of Hollywood. Among the uninspiring latter were the D-Day epic, The Longest Day (1962), in which Marquand enlisted as part of the French contingent; Fred Zinnemann’s post-Spanish civil war film, Behold A Pale Horse (1964), in which he played a Spaniard; and, as the French doctor among the aircrash survivors, in Robert Aldrich’s The Flight Of The Phoenix (1966).

Marquand was better served by Claude Chabrol in The Road To Corinth (1967), in which he portrayed an American Nato security officer investigating mysterious boxes jamming US radar installations in Greece. In 1962, he made Of Flesh and Blood, a competent thriller featuring Anouk Aimée, and the first of two films he directed.

Marquand’s succès de scandale was Candy (1968), about the conquests of a nymphet, played by Ewa Aulin, and adapted by Buck Henry and Terry Southern from the latter’s novel. In the movie, a large international cast, including Marlon Brando, Richard Burton, John Huston, Walter Mathau, James Coburn, Charles Aznavour, Elsa Martinelli, Ringo Starr, and even the boxer Sugar Ray Robinson, did a series of star turns.

The result, according to the Monthly Film Bulletin, was that “hippy psychedelics are laid on with the self-destroying effect of an overdose of garlic”. Disappointed by this mainly negative reception, amidst the era of the love generation, Marquand returned to acting.

Tragically, in the early 1980s, however, he was struck by Alzeimer’s disease and retired from the world. He spent many of his last years in hospital, not knowing anybody who visited him. His sister, the director Nadine Trintignant, wrote a moving book about his plight, Ton Chapeau au Vestiaire (His Hat in The Cloakroom).

She survives him, as do his actor brother Serge Marquand, his former wife Tina Aumont, and his son.

Christian Marquand, actor; born March 15 1927; died November 22 2000


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Sergio Fantoni

 

 

Sergio Fantoni
Sergio Fantoni

Wikipedia entry:

He was born in Rome, the son of actor Cesare Fantoni (1905–1963). In films from the late 1940s, he has worked mainly in his own country but made several appearances in American films in the 1960s, most notably opposite Frank Sinatra in the war film Von Ryan’s Express, made in 1965. In 1960 he played the villainous Haman in Esther and the King, starring Joan Collins and Richard Egan in the title roles. Among his TV roles, he appeared alongside Anglo-Italian actress Cherie Lunghi in the Channel 4 series The Manageress.

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Christian Fourcade

Christian Fourcade
Christian Fourcade

Christian Fourcade was born on April 22, 1942 in Vincennes, France. He is an actor, known for Little Boy Lost (1953), Les Misérables (1953) and Crainquebille (1954).

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Francoise Arnoul

 

 

 

 

Francoise Arnoul
Francoise Arnoul

“Wikipedia” entry:

Françoise Arnoul (born 3 June 1931) is a French actress, who achieved popularity during the 1950s.

Born Françoise Annette Marie Mathilde Gautsch in  Algeria as the daughter of stage actress Janine Henry and artillery general Charles Gautsch, she has two brothers. While her father continued military service in Morocco, the rest of family moved to Paris in 1945.   After learning drama there, she was noticed by director Willy Rozier, who offered her a major role in the film L’Épave (1949).

Arnoul starred in such films as Henri Verneuil‘s Forbidden Fruit (1952), Jean Renoir‘s French Can-Can (1954), Des gens sans importance (1956) with Jean Gabin, Henri Decoin‘s La Chatte (1958), Le Chemin des écoliers (1959) with Bourvil, and Jean Cocteau‘s Testament of Orpheus (1960).   Later in life, she moved into television, appearing in different TV movies and mini-series and also turning to character parts. She published her autobiography entitled Animal doué de bonheur in 1995.   In 1956, Arnoul was married to publicity agent Georges Cravenne whom she had met two years previously, but they separated in 1960.[4] From 1964, she became the companion of French director/scriptwriter Bernard Paul, a relationship which lasted until his death in 1980.

 

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Karin Dor

Karin Dor
Karin Dor
Karin Dor
Karin Dor

Karin Dor was born on February 22, 1938 in Wiesbaden, Hesse, Germany as Kätherose Derr. She is an actress, known for You Only Live Twice (1967), Topaz (1969) and Winnetou: The Red Gentleman (1964).

IMDB Entry:

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Ann-Margret

Ann-Margret
Ann-Margret

 

TCM Overview:

Born Ann-Margaret Olsson in Stockholm, Sweden on April 28, 1941, the redhead who would one day be known simply as Ann-Margret spent the first five years of her life in her native country before her electrician father was offered a job in stateside. The family settled near Chicago, IL; first in Fox Lake, then in Wilmette where they lived in the funeral home where her mother worked as a receptionist. As a vivacious pre-teen, Ann-Margret began entering talent contests, taking her singing and dancing to national television at age 16 on “The Amateur Hour” (DuMont Network, 1946-49; NBC, 1949-1954; ABC, 1955-57). She joined a number of professional bands while still in school, but in 1960, George Burns discovered the cabaret performer singing and playing the maracas in the lounge of the Dunes Hotel in Las Vegas. Impressed with her presence, the comedian hired her for $100 per night to perform in his Christmas show at the Sahara Hotel. After landing a recording contract with RCA and releasing the first of many albums in 1961, she made her feature debut as Bette Davis’ daughter in Frank Capra’s wet-blanket remake, “A Pocketful of Miracles” (1961). The effort earned the actress a Golden Globe Award for Best Newcomer, and though her follow-up, a remake of “State Fair” (1962), bombed, she became the “It girl” of the moment when she sang the Oscar-nominated song “Bachelor in Paradise” at the 34th annual Academy Awards.

With her youthful, high-energy dancing style and breathy vocals, Ann-Margret helped resuscitate the nearly comatose Hollywood musical with her role as the small-town girl chosen to kiss a rock star in “Bye Bye Birdie” (1963). She also played a key role in making “Viva Las Vegas” (1964) Elvis Presley’s best musical, matching the King step-for-step in the talent and sex appeal departments. The project also sparked a romance between the pair, who parted as friends and remained close confidantes throughout Elvis’ tumultuous life. However “Bye Bye Birdie” and “Viva Las Vegas” were the high points of a flurry of forgettable films cranked out to capitalize on Ann-Margret’s sex bomb image. She tackled her first serious role in the uninspired “Kitten with a Whip” (1964), playing a tough, conniving escapee from a reformatory; though some noticed the beginnings of a dramatic actress, most refused to take her seriously. A steady diet of fluff ensued until her 1967 marriage to Roger Smith, the former star of “77 Sunset Strip” (ABC, 1958-1964) who took over her management in partnership with Allan Carr. Smith and Carr groomed Ann-Margret as a variety artist, which begat a decade-long series of highly enjoyable musical-comedy TV specials, beginning with “The Ann-Margret Show” (CBS, 1968). She further survived the death of the Hollywood musical by becoming a staple of the Las Vegas scene where such productions still thrived, selling out shows weeks in advance.

During the 1970s, the cultural icon that had inspired and voiced Ann-Margrock on an episode of “The Flintstones” (ABC, 1960-66) finally won respect as a dramatic actress. Her powerful supporting performance as Jack Nicholson’s neglected wife in Mike Nichols’ “Carnal Knowledge” (1971) brought, in the words of one critic, “the only sign of humanity” to the picture. She would go on to win a Golden Globe and earn an Oscar nomination for the role. A life-threatening, 22-foot fall from a stage in 1972 temporarily disrupted her career and put the entertainer in a coma for three days, but she made a triumphant Las Vegas comeback an astonishing 10 weeks later. The high-profile accident brought in a staggering 51 million viewers to watch her “comeback” TV variety special, “Ann-Margret: When You’re Smiling” (NBC, 1973), the following year. She went on to realize her dream of playing opposite John Wayne by landing role in the relaxed Western “The Train Robbers” (1973), following it up with a surprising and intense performance as deaf, dumb, and blind kid Roger Daltrey’s mother in the rock musical “Tommy” (1975), for which she earned an Oscar nomination for Best Actress. Though Ann-Margret remained busy during the late-1970s, few good roles and films presented themselves, with her acclaimed performance opposite Anthony Hopkins in Richard Attenborough’s “Magic” (1978) outnumbered by lame comedies like “Middle Age Crazy” (1980).

Since meaty feature fare was at a minimum for aging actresses, Ann-Margret turned to television during the ’80s as an outlet for her dramatic talent. Her TV movie debut, “Who Will Love My Children?” (ABC, 1983), was a stunner that earned her a Golden Globe for Best Actress in a Miniseries or Motion Picture Made for Television. Encouraged by director John Erman to shed her glamour image to play the part of a cancer-stricken single mother who tries to place her 10 children with new families before she succumbs, Ann-Margret garnered the first of her many forthcoming Emmy nominations. The following year, she offered a Golden Globe-winning interpretation of Blanche DuBois alongside Treat Williams and Beverly D’Angelo in a TV adaptation of “A Streetcar Named Desire” (ABC, 1984). She gave another excellent performance as a complicating member of a trio in the feature film “Twice in a Lifetime” (1985), as “the other woman” who comes between married couple Gene Hackman and Ellen Burstyn. Ann-Margret’s TV career continued steadily with the actress bringing some class to the enjoyably trashy Dominick Dunne-adapted miniseries, “The Two Mrs. Grenvilles” (NBC, 1987), and holding her own opposite Julie Andrews in the touching AIDS drama “Our Sons” (ABC, 1991). These two TV films plus the follow-up miniseries, “Queen” (CBS, 1993) and the misbegotten “Gone with the Wind” (1939) sequel “Scarlett” (CBS, 1994), were all helmed by Erman, whose partnership with Ann-Margret yielded the actress four Emmy nominations altogether.

As she reached the half-century mark, the multi-faceted entertainer returned to the stage, starring in the biggest production ever staged by a single performer at Radio City Music Hall in 1991. Her profile boost continued with her biggest feature film success in years, as the attractive bone of contention between famous screen team Jack Lemmon and Walter Matthau in “Grumpy Old Men” (1993). Hot on the heels of that major box office success, she released the bestselling memoir, Ann-Margret: My Story for a reported $1 million publishing deal. She re-teamed with her co-stars for the equally popular sequel “Grumpier Old Men” in 1995. At this time, the actress kicked off a producing career through Ann-Margret Productions, creating vehicles for herself like “Following Her Heart” (NBC, 1994) and “Seduced By Madness: The Diane Borchardt Story” (NBC, 1996). Her first foray into series TV came with her role as the matriarch of a large New Mexican ranching family in “Four Corners” (CBS, 1998), which unfortunately fizzled after only three episodes. An Emmy- and Golden Globe-nominated leading role in the Lifetime biopic, “Life of the Party: The Pamela Harriman Story” (1998), about the storied socialite; an almost unrecognizable turn as a wily grandmother in “Happy Face Murders” (Showtime, 1999); and a featured role as a 200-year-old Cinderella in the NBC fantasy miniseries, “The 10th Kingdom” (2000) continued her run as queen of dramatic TV movies.

Returning to feature films to kick off a new era of big screen “mother” roles, Ann-Margret played the estranged mom of a football team owner (Cameron Diaz) in Oliver Stone’s “Any Given Sunday” (1999). The following year, she portrayed the wife of nearly washed-up movie mogul Burt Reynolds in “The Last Producer” (2000), also directed by Reynolds. On the small screen she excelled in the “ripped from the headlines” television movie, “Perfect Murder, Perfect Town: JonBenét and the City of Boulder” (2000), and she appeared in the CBS miniseries “Blonde” (2001), based on the Joyce Carol Oates book, as one of the influential women in the life of Marilyn Monr . In “A Woman is a Hell of a Thing” (2001), she was not used to best effect as the New Age-y stepmother of a men’s magazine publisher, but that same year, she hit a music milestone when her Gospel album, God is Love: The Gospel Sessions, was nominated for a Grammy Award in the Southern, Bluegrass or Country Gospel category. The tireless worker hit the road in a touring production of “The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas” before giving a dazzling performance in the telepic, “A Place Called Home” (2004), as an aging, reclusive Southern belle whose feistiness is pitted against a pair of con artists.

In a new century career swing towards light comedy features, Ann-Margret had a supporting role as the mother of Jimmy Fallon’s rookie cop in the action-buddy film, “Taxi” (2004), and supported Jennifer Aniston and Vince Vaughn in the romantic comedy hit, “The Break-Up” (2006). She played Santa’s mother-in-law in the holiday family offering “The Santa Clause 3: The Escape Clause” (2006), but then the actress went into semi-retirement when she was diagnosed with the neuromuscular disease, myasthenia gravis. Thankfully, she returned to the small screen for an Emmy-winning guest appearance on an episode of “Law & Order: Special Victims Unit” (NBC, 1999- ).

The above TCM overview can also be accessed online here.

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Melina Mercouri

Melina Mercouri
Melina Mercouri

 

Melina Mercouri obituary from “The Independent” in 1994.

Maria Amalia Mercouris (Melina Mercouri), actress and politician: born Athens 18 October 1920; Member of Parliament (Pasok) for Piraeus 1977- 94; Minister of Culture and Sciences 1981-89, 1993-94; married 1942 Panayiotis Harokopos, 1966 Jules Dassin; died New York City 6 March 1994.

IN 1983 Melina Mercouri delivered the Herbert Read Memorial Lecture at the ICA, writes Peter Thompson. As she was already Greece’s Minister of Culture, and on a private visit, she did her best to steer clear of controversy. But nobody would have missed her meaning when she closed by apologising for her accent and added: ‘I hear it and am reminded of what Dylan Thomas said of a British broadcaster: ‘He speaks as if he had the Elgin Marbles in his mouth.’ ‘

The then director of the British Museum, Sir David Wilson, was in the audience that night. At the reception afterwards he found himself sharing a sofa with Mercouri and manfully keeping up his end of a vigorous – and anything but uncontroversial – conversation. His gallantry, however, became ever more tight-lipped as Mercouri’s campaign for the return of the Parthenon Marbles (she contemptuously rejected the term ‘Elgin Marbles’) gathered pace, even though she insisted her quarrel was with the British government, not the British Museum.

Melina Mercouri grew up in a household drenched with politics. Her grandfather was elected Mayor of Athens a record four times, and her father was a left-wing MP in the difficult period after the Greek civil war. Her happy marriage to the film director Jules Dassin was infused with his own radical and unwavering intellectual commitment.

By chance Mercouri was playing in a musical on Broadway when that infamous band of colonels staged their coup d’etat against Greek democracy in April 1967. From the start she was in the front line of the expatriate struggle for their overthrow, and joined the handful of those deprived of their citizenship by Brigadier Pattakos, the junta’s Interior Minister. ‘I was born a Greek, and I will die a Greek. Pattakos was born a Fascist and will die a Fascist,’ was her riposte.

Her home in Paris became an open house for Greek political exiles, whatever their party affiliations, but the first anniversary of the coup she spent in London, addressing a rally of some 20,000 people in Trafalgar Square which will not be forgotten by anyone who was there.

So when in 1974 the colonels finally departed in ignominy, Mercouri was well set for a political career. She joined forces with Andreas Papandreou’s Panhellenic Socialist Movement (Pasok), and three years later was elected MP in the working-class port city of Piraeus. She wore her wealth with ease, was proud that her male constituents accepted her as an equal, and campaigned spectacularly both for practical neighbourhood improvement and for the advancement of women’s rights in a still largely macho society.

When Pasok won the 1981 elections, Mercouri was appointed Minister of Culture, a post she uniquely retained throughout the eight years of socialist rule. What had been a marginal ministry leapt on to the front pages. Among her successes were the impetus given to cultural activity in the provinces, while she most regretted her inability to win a greater share of state budget for the arts. Above all, though, her ministry became an exciting place, buzzing with ideas and enthusiasm, and drawing on talent and energy rather than political loyalty.

Mercouri brought the same dynamism and eagerness to international cultural co-operation, particularly within the EC, where she was much helped by her friendship with Francois Mitterrand and Jack Lang. During the Greek presidency in 1983 she initiated regular meetings of the community’s Culture ministers, and can also take credit for the institution of Cultural Capitals of Europe. Athens was the first such Cultural Capital in 1985.

But it was with the Parthenon Marbles campaign that her name became synonymous. And what a campaign it was. With Mercouri’s glamour and sense of drama to spearhead it, and an erudite and energetic British lobby to disseminate it, the cause penetrated people’s awareness so deeply that it even provided a theme for political cartoons dealing with the 1983 general election in Britain. After any number of leading articles, television documentaries, opinion polls, diplomatic demarches, and an Oxford Union debate, as well as a new book on the subject, it was still making news 10 years later.

Mercouri summed up the argument for the return of the Marbles in her closing words to the Oxford Union: ‘We say: ‘You have kept those sculptures for almost two centuries. You have cared for them as well as you could, for which we thank you. But now in the name of fairness and morality please give them back.’ I believe such a gesture from Great Britain would ever honour your name.’

Mercouri remained loyal to Pasok through all its tribulations after the party lost the 1989 election. She had tribulations of her own, fighting a battle against cancer, but was re-elected to Parliament in 1989, and came close to being elected Mayor of Athens the following year. When Papandreou returned to power last October he re- appointed her Minister of Culture. At one of her last election rallies she told the Athenians: ‘You can be sure the Parthenon Marbles will come back to their home.’ She would have liked nothing better than to live to see it happen.

Film career as per Wikipedia:

Her first movie was the Greek language film Stella (1955), directed by Zorba the Greek director Michael Cacoyannis. The film received special praise at the 1956 Cannes Film Festival, where she met American film director Jules Dassin, with whom she would share not only her career but also her life. Their first professional pairing was 1957’s He Who Must Die. Other films by Dassin and featuring Mercouri followed, such as The Law (1959). She became well-known to international audiences when she starred in Never on Sunday (1960), in which Dassin was the director and co-star, and for which she earned the Best Actress Award at the 1960 Cannes Film Festival and was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Actress and theBAFTA Award for Best Actress in a Leading Role.[2]

After her first major international success, she went on to star in Phaedra (1962), for which she was nominated again for the BAFTA Award and the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in Motion Picture Drama. The recognition of her acting talent did not stop though, as her role in Topkapi (1964) granted her one more nomination, this time for the Golden Globe Award for Best Actress in Motion Picture Musical or Comedy. She worked with such directors as Joseph Losey, Vittorio De Sica, Ronald Neame, Carl Foreman, Norman Jewison, and starred in films like Spanish language The Uninhibited by Juan Antonio Bardem.

She continued her stage career in the Greek production of Tennessee Williams‘s Sweet Bird of Youth (1960), under the direction of Karolos Koun. In 1967, she played the leading role inIllya Darling (from 11 April 1967 to 13 January 1968) on Broadway,[3] for which she was nominated for the Tony Award for Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical, while her performance in Promise at Dawn (1970) earned her another Golden Globe Award nomination.

On 8 October 1962,[4] Mercouri appeared on the American TV show What’s My Line. After the panel were blindfolded, a strange man appeared on-stage and proclaimed himself “the second mystery guest”. Host John Charles Daly quickly called for “the relieving crew” and said “schedule two” (a code word used on live broadcasts in case of an emergency: the cameras are turned to a neutral position and the sound is cut off). The man talked a bit about a dating service he apparently owned before being hustled off the stage by announcer Johnny Olson and executive producer Gil Fates. Daly apologized to the panel and the program continued.[5]

Mercouri concentrated on her stage career for the following years, playing in the Greek productions of The Threepenny Opera and, for a second time, Sweet Bird of Youth, in addition to the ancient Greek tragedies Medea andOresteia. She retired from film acting in 1978, when she played in her last film, A Dream of Passion, directed by her husband, Jules Dassin. Her last performance on stage was in the opera Pylades at the Athens Concert Hall in 1992, portraying Clytemnestra.

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Karola Ebeling

Karola Ebeling

 

Karola Ebeling was born on May 23, 1935 in Berlin, Germany. She is an actress, known for Kreuze am Horizont (1960), Der jähzornige junge Mann (1963) and Oppermann Family (1983).

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Cordula Trantow

Cordula Trantow
Cordula Trantow
Cordula Trantow
Cordula Trantow

 

Cordula Trantow (b. 29 December 1942 in Berlin, Germany) is a German actress and director. For her performance as Geli Raubal in the 1962 film, Hitler, she was nominated for a 1962Golden Globe in the category Most Promising Newcomer – Female. Today, she works mostly as a stage actress and director.