Your browser (Internet Explorer 6) is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites. Learn how to update your browser.
X

Archive for December, 2010

Aside

Jane Carr

Jane Carr
Jane Carr
Jane Carr
Jane Carr

Jane Carr was born in Essex in 1950.   She has two classic film performances to her credit.   In 1968 she was the gullable Mary McGregor under the spell of Maggie Smith in “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie” and then in 1970 in “Something for Everyone” as the daughter of Angela Lansbury.   She was also hilarious in 1977 on the stage in “Once A Catholic” in London’s West End.   Jane Carr moved to the U.S. and starred in the television series “Dear John” and in “Curb Your Enthusiasm”.

Gary Brumburgh’s entry:

Since the late 1980s, American audiences have embraced the “veddy British” talents of character actress Jane Carr — she with the close-set eyes, lilting voice, trowel jaw and bubbly disposition. It helps, of course, having natural comedic timing and the necessary vocal skills to be in constant demand.

She was born Ellen Jane Carr on August 13, 1950, in Loughton, Essex. The daughter of Patrick Carr, a steel erector, and Gwendoline Rose (née Clark), a postal employee, an innate gift for performing was discovered early on by a teacher. As a result, she took acting classes at the Arts Educational School and Corona Stage School, both in London.

Jane made her stage debut at age 14 in a production of “The Spider’s Web”, then went on to appear as the impressionable, ill-fated student “Mary McGregor” in “The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie”, starring Vanessa Redgrave at the Wyndham’s Theatre in 1966. Earning smashing reviews, Jane recreated her shy, stuttering misfit with a delicate mixture of pathos and poignancy in the film version of The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie (1969), this time with Oscar-winning Maggie Smith at the helm as the dangerously influential schoolteacher. A year later, Jane displayed just how extensive her range is projecting devilish menace and merriment in the little known but excellent cult black comedySomething for Everyone (1970), which became a cinematic highlight in the careers of both Michael York and Angela Lansbury, as well.

In the early 70s, Jane made fine use of her prim, “plain Jane” looks for comic effect on several British TV series and in guest appearances. Loftier moments came with the superb series Upstairs, Downstairs (1971) and a production of Daphne Laureola (1978), that starred esteemed acting couple Laurence Olivier and Joan Plowright.

Never far from the stage, Jane appeared in “Spring Awakening” in 1974 and earned a 1977 Laurence Olivier nomination for her work in “Once a Catholic”. In 1978, she became a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company (RSC) and added a solid body of classics to her theatrical resumé, including “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” (Olivier nomination), “The Tempest”, “As You Like It”, “Much Ado About Nothing”, “The Merchant of Venice” (withAlec Guinness) and “The Merry Wives of Windsor”. She also reconnected with her “Jean Brodie” co-star Maggie Smith in a production of “The Way of the World” in 1985.

It was not until 1986 that Jane came to the States playing multiple key roles in the epic RSC revival of “The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby” on Broadway. When the touring company returned to England, Jane elected to stay in Los Angeles. The following year, she married Chicago-born actor Mark Arnott. They have a son, Dash Arnott (aka Dashiel James Arnott).

Jane proceeded to develop an American fanbase after being cast in the role of warm and fizzy Louise Mercer in the sitcom Dear John (1988), which lasted four seasons. With her chirpy British tones, she also managed to carve a career for herself in animated voicework. While she continues to appear occasionally on TV and in films, she hasn’t found quite the showcase she did with Dear John (1988), but has enhanced a number of such off-kiltered shows as Curb Your Enthusiasm (1999) and Monk (2002) with her unique brand of comedy.

Recent plays have included “The Cider House Rules”, “Noises Off”, “Blithe Spirit” (as “Madame Arcati”), “Habeas Corpus” and David Hare‘s “Stuff Happens (as “First Lady Laura Bush” opposite Keith Carradine‘s bemused “President Bush”). Jane’s latest venture on Broadway has been as “Mrs. Brill” in the musical, “Mary Poppins”.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Gary Brumburgh / gr-home@pacbell.net

Aside

Frank Lawton

Frank Lawton
Frank Lawton

Frank Lawton was born in 1904 in London.   His career was mainly in Britain but he did go to Hollywood to play the young adult David in George Cukor’s “David Copperfield” opposite Maureen O’Sullivan in 1935.   His other films include “The Mill on the Floss”, “The Four Just Men” and “Went the Day Well” in 1942.   He was long married to the actress Evelyn Laye.   Frank Lawton died in London in 1969.

Evelyn Laye & Frank Lawton
Aside

Patsy Rowlands

Patsy Rowlands

Patsy Rowlands obituary in “The Independent”.

Patsy Rowlands was born in 1931 in London.   She began her acting career in Torquay and was soon on the London stage.   Her movie debut was in “In the Doghouse” in 1961.   She was hilarious in “A Stitch in Time” with Norman Wisdom and “A Kind of Loving” with Alan Bates and June Ritchie.   She acted in  several of the more popular television series of the 1960’s and then joined the Carry On team to star in “Carry on Again Doctor” in 1969.   She starred in nine of the series.   Patsy Rowlands was also in the cast of “Bless This House”.   She died in 2005.

Her obituary by Tom Vallance in “The Independent”:

Although she reached her widest audience with her appearances in nine of the immensely popular “Carry On” comedies, the talents of the actress Patsy Rowlands were known to theatregoers years earlier.

Patsy Rowlands

She made her West End début with a notable performance in Sandy Wilson’sValmouth (1959), and she was part of the “New Wave” of talent that invigorated both stage and screen in the Sixties. She worked with such key figures of the period as Tony Richardson, John Schlesinger, Harold Pinter and N.F. Simpson, but despite such prestigious credits and enormous respect within the profession, it is probably true to say that her talents were under- appreciated until she became part of the “Carry On” team.

Born in Palmers Green, London in 1934, and educated at several convent schools, she had no particular aim in life until her parents sent her for elocution lessons. Encouraged by the teacher, she won a scholarship to the Guildhall School of Music and Drama at the age of 15. She made her theatrical début in the chorus of the touring production of Annie Get Your Gun (1951), then spent several years at the Players’ Theatre, singing music-hall songs and appearing in their traditional pantomimes. (The future “Carry On” stars Hattie Jacques and Joan Sims were also alumnae of the Players.)

She made her West End début when cast by the director Vida Hope in Sandy Wilson’s brilliant, audacious and controversial musical version of Ronald Firbank’s novel Valmouth, which opened at the Lyric, Hammersmith, in 1958 and transferred to the Saville Theatre the following year. As Thetis Cooke, the country lass pining for her absent sailor boy, she gave a subtly mischievous performance.

Her persuasive soprano (preserved on the original cast album) indicates that she could have had a flourishing career in musicals, and few who saw the show’s first incarnation will forget her underplayed, hilarious performance of her riverside song solo, “I Loved a Man”. Hope had given her some wickedly sly business with a twitching fish, the number ending with Rowlands on her back with the fish between her toes, which had most of the audience convulsed, though probably not the critic who asked in his column, “Has the censor quit?”

Sandy Wilson, who remembers Rowlands as “unique, sweet, funny and ridiculous” in the role, recalls that when Princess Margaret attended a performance at the Saville, one newspaper next day complained that she should not have been exposed to such a disgusting number. “It caused the censor to take another look at the show,” Wilson told me, “and he decided that she could still sing to the fish, but it had to be dead and not move!”

As part of the theatre’s New Wave of the early Sixties, she appeared as Sylvia Groomkirby (her favourite role) in N.F. Simpson’s surreal comedy, One Way Pendulum (1959), and as Avril Hadfield in David Turner’s Semi-Detached (1962), directed by Tony Richardson and starring Sir Laurence Olivier. Richardson, a particular champion of Rowlands’ versatile talents, gave her one of her first important screen roles, as a nubile young miss in his masterly, Oscar-winning version of Tom Jones (1963), scripted by Pinter.

She had made her screen début in On The Fiddle (1961), and followed it with an effective performance as the heroine’s tenacious girl-friend in John Schlesinger’s biting drama A Kind of Loving(1962), starring June Ritchie and Alan Bates. Her agent, Simon Beresford, said, “She was from the old school. She had skills in musical theatre and high drama. That is why she worked with the great and the good of directors.”

‘When We ArevMarried”.

Carry On Again Doctor (1969) was the first of nine “Carry On”s in which she appeared, playing roles ranging from the Queen in Carry On, Henry (1971) to a loo cleaner in Carry On at Your Convenience(1971). Often she was an outwardly timid soul nursing hidden passions which finally erupt, such as the mayor’s wife in Carry On Girls (1973), sabotaging her spouse’s beauty contest by burning her bra and joining Women’s Lib. She was proud of the series, stating, “They had good, honest humour, sometimes naughty but never too rude – entertainment for all the family.” Her last film in the series was Carry On Behind (1975).

Later films included Richardson’s Joseph Andrews (1976) and Roman Polanski’s Tess (1980), and on stage she was directed by Lindsay Anderson in The Seagull (1975). She was also a familiar face on television. She appeared in such series as Danger Man and The Avengers, and in 1969 gave a deliciously witty performance in Ray Galton and Alan Simpson’s TV play An Extra Bunch of Daffodils.

She also played Betty, the feckless neighbour in the long-running series Bless This House (1971-76) with Sid James, and starred in Nigel Kneale’s sci-fi comedy Kinvig (1981). More recently her plump, rustic features were put to effective use in classic serials such asVanity Fair (1998) and The Cazalets (2001). Her later stage roles included The Wind in the Willows (1990), directed by Nicholas Hytner, and a delightful performance as Mrs Pearce in the National Theatre revival of My Fair Lady (2002).

Tom Vallance

The above “Independent” obituary can also be accessed online here.

Aside

Mark Strong

Mark Strong

Mark Strong. TCM Overview.

Mark Strong is one of the best of film actors currently on the screen.   He is also one of the busiest and it is hoped that he would soon be in leading man roles.   He was  born in 1963 in London to an Italian father and an Austrian mother.   He studied at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre School.  

He first came to prominence in the third of the “Prime Suspect” series with Helen Mirren.   In 1996 he was in the superb TV drama “Our Friends From the North” with Gina McKee, Daniel Craig and Christopher Eccleston.   His film roles include “Century” in 1993, “Fever Pitch”, “The Long Firm”, “Low Winter Sun”, “RocknRolla”, “Body of Lies”, “Sherlock Holmes” and “Robin Hood”.   He is an actor to watch.

TCM Overview:

Austere yet handsome, Mark Strong’s chameleon-like talents made him a hugely sought-after villain in both big-budget action and independent films after a lengthy career in his native England. He gave good bad guy in Guy Ritchie’s “Revolver” (2005), the dramatic thriller “Syriana” (2005), and Matthew Vaughnâ’s fantasy “Stardust” (2007). Strong played the heavy in the comedy “Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day” (2008) before reuniting twice with Ritchie to anchor “RocknRolla” (2008) and essay the satanic Lord Blackwood in the Robert Downey, Jr./Jude Law hit adventure, “Sherlock Holmes” (2009).

Continuing to work with a laundry list of great film directors, Strong worked twice under the direction of Ridley Scott as the Jordanian Head of Intelligence in “Body of Lies” (2008), and then wreaked further havoc as Godfrey opposite Russell Crowe in “Robin Hood” (2010). Also that year, Strong scared a younger audience as the mob boss in the kids-turned-superheroes hit “Kick-Ass” (2010). With an admitted penchant for playing his deliciously evil roles to the hilt, Strong counted greats such as Sir Ian McKellen among his many fans. Going bad only ended up being a good thing for this talented actor.

Marco Giuseppe Salussolia was born Aug. 30, 1963 in London, England to a teenage Austrian mother and an Italian father who walked out the family shortly afterwards. Strong’s mother changed his last name to help her son better fit in with his peers. At age five, Strong who spoke both English and German was sent away to a state-funded boarding school in Surrey, as his single mother found it difficult to handle some of his behaviors. Though he desperately missed home, Strong thrived in his new environment and occupied his alone time with much reflection and people-watching. He became adept at solo travel and music, singing lead in a noisy punk bank called Private Party. Strong performed in one play, but found that it held little luster for him.

After he graduated, he headed to Munich to study law, but bailed after a year and returned to London. He happened upon drama courses at Royal Holloway, where he earned a degree, and which led to post-grad work at the Bristol Old Vic Theater School.

Mark Strong
Mark Strong

Strong spent the next eight years on stage and carved out a significant career with high-profile parts in productions of “The Iceman Cometh” with Kevin Spacey, David Mamet’s “Speed the Plow” in the West End, and Sam Mendes’s “Twelfth Night,” for which he was nominated for the Laurence Olivier Award for Best Performance in a Supporting Role.

In 1989, Strong began work on television in a variety of guest-spots, which included an installment of the highly regarded crime-drama series “Prime Suspect 3” (ITV, 1993), as an inspector opposite Helen Mirren’s formidable Jane Tennison.

The actor won more notice on the BAFTA-winning, “Our Friends in the North” (BBC, 1996), as Tosker, whose get-rich-quick schemes invariably fail. Strong brought an earthly strength to his role as Mr. Knightley opposite Kate Beckinsale in the televised adaptation of Jane Austen’s “Emma” (ITV, 1996), and was the sports-obsessed best friend to Colin Firth in the big screen romantic comedy set against the world of soccer in “Fever Pitch” (1997).

Mark Strong
Mark Strong

Strong also became a fixture on television, resuming his character Larry Hall now promoted to Detective Chief Superintendent on “Prime Suspect 6: The Last Witness” (ITV, 2003), that he was gifted with a career-changing role on the four-part crime-drama series “The Long Firm” (BBC, 2004). Strong played East End gangster Harry Starks, who had no qualms about silencing enemies with a white-hot poker down the throat. Strong, however, had to convince both the writer and director that he could plumb the darker waters Starks occupied. In doing so, he won the 2005 Broadcasting Press Guild Award for Best Actor, and was also nominated for the 2005 BAFTA TV Award for Best Actor.

Deciding to focus on film over television, Strong perfected his menace with Guy Ritchie’s crime thriller “Revolver” (2005), where he was the steely sharp assassin Sorter, and then inhabited the Lebanese-Muslim Mussawi in the thrill-ride look at international corruption within the oil industry in “Syriana” (2005), opposite George Clooney. In the Ridley and Tony Scott-produced medieval romantic legend “Tristan & Isolde” (2006),

Strong was the murderous, power seeking Lord Wictred, and in the action fantasy “Stardust” (2007) directed by Matthew Vaughn, the actor played a cruel prince in pursuit of both the throne and immortality. In “Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day” (2008), Strong was a controlling 1930s nightclub owner addicted to cocaine, and in “RocknRolla” (2008), he played a gangster.

He was nominated for the 2009 British Supporting Actor of the Year by the London Critics Circle Film Awards for the dramatic thriller “Body of Lies” (2008). Directed by Ridley Scott and starring Leonardo DiCaprio, and Russell Crowe, the spy film featured Strong as Hani Salaam, the deceptive head of Jordanian General Intelligence Department.

Buoyed by successful, versatile portrayals, the demand for Strong in bigger and meatier fare saw the actor as both ambitious and malicious as Sir John Conroy, advisor to the Queen in the highly touted historical drama “Young Victoria” (2009).

Mark Strong
Mark Strong

Strong was a standout in his third pairing with Ritchie in the action-mystery “Sherlock Holmes” (2009), based on the tale of the famous detective. Opposite Robert Downey, Jr. and Jude Law, Strong played the main antagonist, the aristocratic Satanist and serial killer, Lord Blackwood, and was universally praised as a convincing and creepy villain that gave the film its only dark edge.

Mark Strong
Mark Strong

Strong kept with the sinister, but moved to a new genre with the kid-powered yet surprisingly violent action-comedy “Kick-Ass” (2010), based on the comic book of the same name. The critically and commercially successful film a re-team with director Vaughn featured Strong as the main heavy, Frank D’Amico, a Mafioso, whose facade of respectability was crushed by an adult and two children dressed like superheroes intent on justice.

Mark Strong
Mark Strong

With “Sherlock” under his belt, Strong tackled another English legend this time, “Robin Hood” (2010), as directed by Ridley Scott and embodied by Russell Crowe, with Cate Blanchett onboard as Maid Marian. This retelling of the myth of Sherwood Forest featured Strong once again as the antagonist, Anglo-French double agent, Sir Godfrey, henchman to the ruthless King John (Kevin Durand).

Mark Strong
Mark Strong

This was followed by key roles in the well-received espionage story “Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy” (2011) and Kathryn Bigelow’s Osama bin Laden story “Zero Dark Thirty” (2012). Unfortunately, Strong also co-starred in the notorious science fiction flop “John Carter” (2012) during this time. In 2013, Strong landed his first major role in American television, playing Detroit policeman Frank Agnew in the corruption drama “Low Winter Sun” (AMC 2013- )

By J.F. Pryor

The above TCM Overview can also be accessed online here.

Aside

Georgina Hale

Georgina Hale
Georgina Hale

Georgina Hale. IMDB.

Georgina Hale was born in 1943 in Ilford, Essex.   She began acting in British television in the mid 1960’s.   Ken Russell recognised her talents and cast her in 1971 in “The Devils”, “The Boyfriend”, “Mahler” and “Liztomania”.   She has also starred with Alan Bates in “Butley” by Simon Gray.   She is currently in the populat television series “Hollyoaks”.   Georgina Hale is one of my favourite actresses.

Georgina Hale
Georgina Hale

Her IMDB biography:

Georgina Hale is an accomplished stage actress who has made many memorable forays in cinema. Most notably in the films of Ken Russell including her performance as Alma Mahler, in a wonderful and visually rich biopic on the composer Mahler (1974) which she won a BAFTA (British Academy Award) for. Two other standout performances were in Russell’s notorious The Devils (1971) and the Twiggy musical The Boyfriend in which she deliciously plays Fay, camping it up, in a backstage lesbian sub plot. She has made in-joke cameos in two further Russell films: Lisztomania (1975) and Valentino (1977).

Unfortunately roles were not forthcoming after her BAFTA win (who knows why?) and she made some pretty bad movie choices such as the film version of the tacky Joan Collinsnovel The World Is Full of Married Men (1979) and McVicar (1980) as well as the occasional stunner such as Butley (1974), written by playwright Simon Gray. Georgina has appeared in many of Gray’s stage plays (many have been filmed for British television with her starring) along side Alan Bates and Glenda Jackson and continues to work in British theatre. Georgina has made many appearances as guest star in television series including: Upstairs, Downstairs (1971), The Protectors (1972), Ladykillers (1980), Minder(1979), Boon (1986), One Foot in the Grave (1990), Murder Most Horrid (1991), The Vicar of Dibley (1994), three episodes of Doctor Who (1963) and many many more.

She has starred in two television series: Budgie (1971), a successful series in the seventies, and in the early nineties a cult children’s series based around a witch like figure called T-Bag. Most recently she has appeared in a comic role in Preaching to the Perverted (1997) in which her character points out that sometimes one has to debase one’s self to further one’s career. This film may not further her career (at age 55 she does a Sharon Stoneunder-table leg trick) but it will add to her growing reputation as one of the UK’s favorite cult actresses.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: strangeboy76@hotmail.com

The above IMDB entry can also be accessed online here.

Aside

Kenneth More

Kenneth More
Kenneth More
 

Quote from David Shipman in “The Great Movie Stars – The International Years” (1972):

“Kenneth More was THE big British star of the 50’s.   e might be claimed to be the last solely British star.   With the 60s,  Hollywood took over the British production fiel, in some ears financing as much as 90% of production.   British players became internation.   Maybe More was the right person for the role.   He said once – “I seem fated to be either the stiff upper lip war hero or the hearty back slapping beer drinking idot”, the typical Englishman in fact.”

Kenneth More was one of the most beloved British film actors of the 1950’s.   He was born in 1914 in Gerrard’s Cross.   Hewas assistant stage manager at the famous Windmill Theatre before becoming an actor.   He had small supporting parts from the alte 1940’s and then in 1953 scored an enormous hit with the classic “Genevieve” with Kay Kendall, Dinah Sheridan and John Gregson.   He starred in “Doctor in the House” with Dirk Bogarde, “The Deep Blue Sea” with Vivien Leigh, “Reach for the Sky” as was hero Douglas Bader, “A Night to Remember”, “North-West Frontier” with Lauren Bacall and “Sink the Bismarck” with Dana Wynter.   In the 1960’s his movie career suddenly declined but he went on to star in the theatre with great success and then had a television triumph in “The Forsyte Saga” in 1967 with Nyree Dawn Porter.   Sadly illness curtailed his later career.   Kenneth More died in 1982.  His wife was the actress Angela Douglas.

His IMDB entry:

Affable, bright and breezy Kenneth More epitomised the traditional English virtues of fortitude and fun. At the height of his fame in the 1950s he was Britain’s most popular film star and had appeared in a string of box office hits including Genevieve (1953),Doctor in the House (1954), Reach for the Sky (1956) and A Night to Remember (1958).

Later in his career, when the film industry declined, he turned his talents to television where his interpretations of Jolyon in BBC’s The Forsyte Saga (1967) and the title role inFather Brown (1974) made him a household name all over again.

More was a shrewd man when it came to the business of acting. He knew his limitations and what roles suited him. When the director Sir Peter Hall once suggested that he play Claudius to Albert Finney’s Hamlet at the Royal National Theatre, More declined saying “One part of me would like to, but the other part said that there were so many great Shakespearian actors who could have done it better. I stick to the roles I can play better than them.”

Born in Gerrards Cross in 1914 More’s early grounding was in variety and legitimate theatre in the UK. On screen, like many leading men in the 1950s such as John Mills and Jack Hawkins, he seemed to spend most of the decade in uniform. When he read Reach for the Sky, the biography of the legless wartime pilot Douglas Bader, he was desperate to play the role, even though it was earmarked for Richard Burton. “I knew I was the only actor who could play the part properly” he said. “Most parts that can be played by one actor can equally well be played by another, but not this. Bader’s philosophy was my philosophy. His whole attitude to life was mine.”

Films such as North West Frontier (1959) and Sink the Bismarck! (1960) kept More at the top although his favourite role was as the down at heel actor in Loss of Innocence(1961). His private life was colourful and he was rarely out of the newspaper headlines. He was married three times, lastly to the actress Angela Douglas, whom he met whilst filming Some People (1962) with her. His drinking companions were the hellraisers Trevor Howard and Jack Hawkins. Noel Coward once tried to seduce him in a bedroom but More gasped “Oh, Mr Coward, sir – I could never have an affair with you, because you remind me of my father!”

Asked to sum up his enduring appeal More said “A film like Genevieve to my contemporaries is not a film made years ago, but last week or last year. They see me as I was then, not as I am now. I am the reassurance that they have not changed. In an upside down world, with all the rules being rewritten as the game goes on and spectators invading the pitch, it is good to feel that some things and some people seem to stay just as they were.”

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Patrick Newley

The above IMDB entry can also be accessed online here.

Aside

Murray Melvin

Murray Melvin
Murray Melvin
Murray Melvin
Murray Melvin
Murray Melvin
Murray Melvin

 

Murray Melvin was born in 1932 in London.   He acted with Joan Littlewood’s theatre company and in 1958 was in Brendan Behan’s “The Hostage”.   In 1961 he starred in Shelagh Delaney’s “A Taste of Honey” with Rita Tushingham and Dora Bryan directed by Tony Richardson.   His cinema highlights also include “The Devils”, “Alfie”, “The Boyfriend” with Twiggy and Stanley Kubrick’s “Barry Lyndon” with Ryan O’Neal in 1975.   It was good to see him recently in the film of the musical “The Phantom of the Opera”.   Murray Melvin was in the very first episode of the cult TV series “The Avengers”.

TCM Overview:

Narrow-faced, slender, haughty-looking character player, best known for his Cannes award-winning performance as Rita Tushingham’s sympathetic gay friend in Tony Richardson’s adaptation of Shelagh Delaney’s “angry young woman” drama, “A Taste of Honey” (1961). A prolific theater actor–he originated the “Honey” role on the stage–Melvin has appeared in several films, including three by director Peter Medak: “A Day in the Death of Joe Egg” (1970), “The Krays” (1990) and “Let Him Have It” (1991).

Aside

Mary Peach

Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach

 

Mary Peach
Mary Peach

Beautiful and talented Mary Peach was born in Durban, South Africa in 1934.   She began her career on British television where she starred in many episodes of “Armchair Theatre”.   Her film debut came in 1959 with “Room At The Top” as the girlfriend of Donald Houston.   Mary Peach was soon in leading roles in such films as “No Love For Johnnie” opposite Peter Finch in 1961 and “A Pair of Briefs” opposite Michael Craig.   In 1963 she was brought out to Hollywood to make”A Gathering of Eagles” as the wife of Rock Hudson.   She resumed her career in the U.K. and starred in 1967 in the cult classic “The Projected Man”.  Mary Peach also stared in a well-regarded adaptation of “The Three Musketeers”with Jeremy Brett.  She was considered to replace Diana Rigg in TV’s “The Avengers”. Mary Peach was long  married to the late famed film producer Jimmy Sangster.

Mary Peach (Wikipedia)

born 20 October 1934) is a South African-born British film and television actress, who was married to the screenwriter and director Jimmy Sangster until his death in 2011.

Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach

Peach was born in Durban. After being nominated for a BAFTA Award as most promising newcomer for the 1959 film Room at the Top, she went on to appear on many British films and television series over the next 25 years. She starred opposite Rock Hudson in the film A Gathering of Eagles and in 1970 she appeared in the film Scrooge, a musical version of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol starring Albert Finney

Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach & Peter Finch
Mary Peach & Peter Finch

She appeared as a regular in the TV series CouplesInside Story, the 1966 BBC adaptation of The Three MusketeersFox, the Doctor Who serial The Enemy of the World and in 1978 she starred opposite Ian McShane in Disraeli. When Diana Rigg left The Avengers in 1968, she was one of the actresses considered for the role of Steed’s new assistant.

Mary Peach

Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Mary Peach
Aside

Tony Osoba

Tony Osoba
Tony Osoba

Tony Osoba was born in Glasgow in 1947.   He has guest starred in most of the popular British television series since the 1970’s including “The Professionals”, “Dempsey and Makepeace”, and “Between the Lines”.   He starred with Ronnie Barker and Richard Beckinsale in TV’s “Porridge”.   His films include “Game for Vultures” in 1979 with Richard Harris and Joan Collins and “Who Dares Wins” i 1982 with Richard Widmark and Lewis Collins.   His website here.

IMDB Entry:

Tony Osoba was born in Glasgow, Scotland, and has become a familiar face to TV audiences in a career spanning more than 30 years. Tony joined the RSAMD at the age of 18 in Glasgow. His breakthrough role came in 1974 when he starred opposite Ronnie Barker in the popular BBC sitcom ‘Porridge’. Tony played in-mate Jock McLaren throughout the 3 seasons of the show, as well as appearing in the first episode of the follow-up series ‘Going Straight’ in 1978 and starring in the film version of Porridge in 1979.

During his career he has made more than 200 television appearances, including ‘Doctor Who’ opposite Tom Baker in the 1979 story ‘Destiny Of The Daleks’, and later in the 1987 story ‘Dragonfire’, with Sylvester McCoy. In 1985, Tony starred as Det. Sgt. Chas Jarvis in all three seasons of the Drama series ‘Dempsey & Makepeace’, and later joined the cast of ‘Coronation Street’ in 1990 as Peter Ingram. In the 1990s, he appeared in programmes such as ‘The Bill’, ‘Taggart’, ‘Bugs’ and ‘Holby City’.   Tony has also had a successful career on the stage, and recently starred in a major UK Theatre Tour of Rodger & Hammerstein’s ‘The King & I’ in 2005.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Oliver Crocker

Aside

Walter Fitzgerald

Walter Fitzgerald
Walter Fitzgerald

Walter Fitzgerald was a distinguished British character actor.   He was born in 1896 in Devon.   His first film was in 1932 in “Murder In Covent Garden”.   His cinema highlights include “In Which We Serve”, “San Demitro, London”, “The Fallen Idol” and “Treasure Island”.  He went to Hollywood in 1959 to make “Darby O’Gill and the Little People” for Walt Disney.    He died in 1976 in London at the age of 80.

His IMDB entry:

Walter Fitzgerald was born on May 18, 1896 in Keyhan, Derby, England as Walter Bond. He was an actor, known for Treasure Island (1950), The Fallen Idol (1948) and Darby O’Gill and the Little People (1959). He died on December 20, 1976 in London, England.

Square-jawed, balding British character actor who usually played authority figures and men of integrity. In his youth, he was briefly active on the Stock Exchange before training at RADA for an acting career. Began on stage in 1922, in films ten years later. His best spell was from the mid-1940’s, notably as Dr. Fenton The Fallen Idol (1948) and Squire Trelawney in Treasure Island (1950).