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Alfred Molina

Alfred Molina

IMDB Entry:

Alfred Molina was born in 1953 in London, England. His mother, Giovanna (Bonelli), was an Italian-born cook and cleaner, and his father, Esteban Molina, was a Spanish-born waiter and chauffeur. He studied at the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, London. His stage work includes two major Royal National Theatre productions, Tennessee Williams‘ “The Night of the Iguana” (as Shannon) and David Mamet‘s “Speed the Plow” (as Fox), plus a splendid performance in Yasmina Reza‘s “Art” (his Broadway debut), for which he received a Tony Award nomination in 1998. He made his film debut in Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981) and got a good part in Letter to Brezhnev (1985) (as a Soviet sailor who spends a night in Liverpool), but his movie breakthrough came two years later when he played–superbly–Kenneth Halliwell, the tragic lover of playwright Joe Orton, in Stephen Frears‘ Prick Up Your Ears (1987). He was also outstanding in Enchanted April (1991), The Perez Family (1995) (as a Cuban immigrant), Anna Karenina (1997) (as Levin) and Chocolat (2000) (as the narrow-minded mayor of a small French town circa 1950s, who tries to shut down a chocolate shop).

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Thanassis Agathos<thanaga@hol.gr

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Peter Lupus

Peter Lupus

Peter Lupus was born on June 17, 1932 in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. He is known for his work on Challenge of the Gladiator (1965), Mission: Impossible (1966) and Goliath at the Conquest of Damascus (1965). He has been married to Sharon M. Hildebrand since November 27, 1960. They have one child.

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Betty Lou Kiem

Betty Lou Kiem
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Lita Baron

Lita  Baron
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Clu Gulagher

Clu Gulagher

IMDB Entry:

Clu Gulager was born William Martin Gulager in Holdenville, Hughes County, Oklahoma. His nickname was given to him by his father for the clu-clu birds (known in English as martins, like his middle name) that were nesting at the Gulager home at the time Clu was born. He grew up on his uncle’s ranch as a cowhand and when he was old enough he joined the United States Marine Corps for a stint from 1946-1948. He got the acting bug being in army plays so when he left he used the GI Bill of Rights to study acting. During this time he met his wife, actress Miriam Byrd Nethery. They had two children together –John, born in 1957, and Tom, born 1965. He was married over 50 years until his wife passed away in 2003 from cancer. Clu’s career started off as bit parts on popular western shows usually playing the heavy. Shows like Wanted Dead or Alive, Have Gun Will Travel, Laramie, Riverboat. He scored big with The Untouchables as Mad Dog Coll, which led to him being offered the role of Billy the Kid on The Tallman from 1960-1961, which also starred Barry Sullivan as Pat Garrett. The show was pulled after two seasons by Congress because they didn’t like the idea that kids were seeing the outlaw Billy the Kid as a hero. Clu’s next big break was playing Deputy Emmett Ryker on The Virginian from 1964-1968. During this time he also fared very well as Lee Marvin’s sidekick in the 1964 TV film The Killers, which was considered too violent for TV so it went to theaters. Having being burned out being a TV star he tried to break into films, mostly as a character actor. His stand out films were The Last Picture Show (1971, playing Ellen Burstyn’s lover), McQ (1974) with John Wayne and A Force of One (1979) with Chuck Norris, with whom he would work in the 1990’s on Walker, Texas Ranger. Clu was also cast in San Francisco International Airport, with Lloyd Bridges, which failed big time. Throughout the 70’s and 80’s he was in almost every show around, playing bit parts. Then the unthinkable happened: he found a second career as a horror film actor; he followed the footsteps of other TV actors who were stuck in TV hell, like his costar from The Virginian –Doug McClure– and Christopher George. Both of them in late 70’s and early 80’s found new careers in B movies and late night horror films. Clu finally got a lead part in Dan O’ Bannon’s cult classic The Return of the Living Dead (1985). He also was in A Nightmare on Elm Street Part 2: Freddy’s Revenge (1985) Throughout the 80’s and 90’s he would appear in TV and in the occasional horror flick. In 2005 he started acting in his son’s horror films –the Feasts movies and Piranha DD in his 80’s. Not letting age get in his way, he has been a horror fan favorite and still shows up at conventions at almost 90 now. You can say one thing about Clu: what a diverse career it has been for this awesome cowboy!

– IMDb Mini Biography By: cgay

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William Campbell

William Campbell

“Guardian” obituary from 2011 by Ronald Bergan

The actor William Campbell, who has died aged 87, had a long and varied career in films and on television, finding recognition from his association with several low-budget horror pictures and with the TV sci-fi series Star Trek. However, although he had the hooded eyes and languid manner of Robert Mitchum and something of the laid-back anarchism of Jack Nicholson, entry into the major league of stardom eluded him.

Campbell was in the first series of Star Trek, in an episode entitled The Squire of Gothos (1967), in which he has a field day as General Trelane, a foppish, childish humanoid, swinging wildly from joviality to sulkiness to anger. In The Trouble With Tribbles (1967), in the second season, Campbell was equally impressive as Koloth, a bearded, bureaucratic Klingon, a character that he revived 27 years later, towards the end of his working life, in Blood Oath, in the series Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1994).

Born in Newark, New Jersey, he studied acting with Uta Hagen and Herbert Berghof at the latter’s celebrated studio in New York, before serving in the Pacific with the US navy during the second world war. Campbell made his screen debut as a dockside character in The Breaking Point (1950), the second film adaptation of Ernest Hemingway’s To Have and Have Not, starring John Garfield. Sporting a “ducktail” haircut, fashionable in the 1950s, he would continue to give good support to big stars, often stealing a scene or two from them.

Among his early roles were as a nasty perjurer trying to help convict an innocent man defended by lawyer Spencer Tracy in The People Against O’Hara (1951); a cocky rookie baseball player giving his manager (Edward G Robinson) a few headaches, in Big Leaguer (1953); and a callow second officer riling an ageing pilot, John Wayne, in The High and the Mighty (1954). Wise guy Campbell and gruff old-timer William Demarest, at odds as Confederate prisoners, brought some comic relief to Escape from Fort Bravo (1953) before they are tracked down by cavalry officer William Holden; and the 32-year-old Campbell justified his co-starring credit in Man Without a Star (1955) by being convincing as a young drifter (“Don’t call me kid”) who latches on to cowboy Kirk Douglas.

In the same year, Campbell won his first leading role, in Cell 2455, Death Row, as Caryl Chessman, convicted of robbery, kidnapping and rape, the first person to be sentenced to death in California for kidnapping under the
‘Little Lindbergh’ law without having murdered anyone. Campbell as Chessman is riveting as he develops from a teenage hoodlum in reform school, to a ruthless thug in prison to a respected legal mind. Chessman, who was still fighting his sentence at the time, approved Campbell and the film, hoping it would help his case. However, he was executed five years later.

Following what was arguably his best film performance, Campbell got further starring roles in B-movies and supporting ones in A-movies. An example of the latter was the civil war drama Love Me Tender (1956), in which Elvis Presley made his screen debut. Campbell, who bore a resemblance to the king of rock’n’roll, played Presley’s brother, and got to sing We’re Gonna Move with him, although he was dubbed.

A few years later, Campbell signed for five pictures with the Z-movie mogul Roger Corman. Perhaps Corman was attracted by Campbell’s portrayal of off-kilter types. In The Young Racers (1963), Campbell plays an arrogant and reckless Lotus driver who endangers his own life and those of his fellow drivers. At the climax, we discover that he is a sensitive and confused personality. In Corman’s The Secret Invasion (1964), written by Campbell’s screenwriting brother, R Wright Campbell, and predating The Dirty Dozen by three years, he was part of a crew of five convicts out to rescue an Italian general being held hostage by Nazis during the second world war.

Corman produced Francis Ford Coppola’s first credited feature, Dementia 13 (1963), a horror quickie shot in Ireland, in which Campbell portrayed a taciturn sculptor suspected of beheading two people with an axe. Cashing in on his creepy persona, Campbell was a deranged artist trying to steal a Titian painting in Portrait in Terror (1965) and, more notoriously, in Blood Bath (aka Track of the Vampire, 1966), he stalks girls and kills them, by dropping them into boiling wax, and then paints them.

Campbell appeared in only two more features, as a cop questioning a schoolteacher (actually a psychopathic killer), played by Rock Hudson, in Roger Vadim’s dire soft-core sex satire Pretty Maids All in a Row (1971) and an Italian gangster in the blaxploitation movie Black Gunn (1972), both of which might have convinced him to stick to television, where he had led a parallel career as guest star on almost all the main shows since 1951, though he only had one series in which he starred, Cannonball (in 39 episodes from 1958 to 1959), about long-distance truckers.

In 1952, Campbell married Judith Immoor, who later (after their divorce, in 1958) claimed to have had affairs with Frank Sinatra and John F Kennedy (from 1960 into his presidency). As Judith Exner (from her second marriage), she wrote a memoir, My Story, in 1977, on which the TV drama Power and Beauty (2002) was based, in which Campbell was portrayed by a Canadian actor, Grant Nickalls. “What mutual friends we had you could count on one hand,” Campbell once commented. “How she ever met the president, I don’t know.”

Campbell is survived by his third wife, Tereza, whom he married in 1963.

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Fred MacMurray

Fred MacMurray

IMDB:

Fred MacMurray was likely the most underrated actor of his generation. True, his earliest work is mostly dismissed as pedestrian, but no other actor working in the 1940s and 50s was able to score so supremely whenever cast against type.

Frederick Martin MacMurray was born in Kankakee, Illinois, to Maleta Martin and Frederick MacMurray. His father had Scottish ancestry and his mother’s family was German. His father’s sister was vaudeville performer and actress Fay Holderness. When MacMurray was five years old, the family moved to Beaver Dam in Wisconsin, his parents’ birth state. He graduated from Beaver Dam High School (later the site of Beaver Dam Middle School), where he was a three-sport star in football, baseball, and basketball. Fred retained a special place in his heart for his small-town Wisconsin upbringing, referring at any opportunity in magazine articles or interviews to the lifelong friends and cherished memories of Beaver Dam, even including mementos of his childhood in several of his films. In “Pardon my Past”, Fred and fellow GI William Demarest are moving to Beaver Dam, WI to start a mink farm.

MacMurray earned a full scholarship to attend Carroll College in Waukesha, Wisconsin and had ambitions to become a musician. In college, MacMurray participated in numerous local bands, playing the saxophone. In 1930, he played saxophone in the Gus Arnheim and his Coconut Grove Orchestra when Bing Crosby was the lead vocalist and Russ Columbo was in the violin section. MacMurray recorded a vocal with Arnheim’s orchestra “All I Want Is Just One Girl” — Victor 22384, 3/20/30. He appeared on Broadway in the 1930 hit production of “Three’s a Crowd” starring Sydney GreenstreetClifton Webb and Libby Holman. He next worked alongside Bob Hope in the 1933 production of “Roberta” before he signed on with Paramount Pictures in 1934 for the then-standard 7-year contract (the hit show made Bob Hope a star and he was also signed by Paramount). MacMurray married Lillian Lamont (D: June 22, 1953) on June 20, 1936, and they adopted two children.

Although his early film work is largely overlooked by film historians and critics today, he rose steadily within the ranks of Paramount’s contract stars, working with some of Hollywood’s greatest talents, including wunderkind writer-director Preston Sturges (whom he intensely disliked) and actors Humphrey Bogart and Marlene Dietrich. Although the majority of his films of the 30’s can largely be dismissed as standard fare there are exceptions: he played opposite Claudette Colbert in seven films, beginning with The Gilded Lily (1935). He also co-starred with Katharine Hepburn in the classic, Alice Adams(1935), and with Carole Lombard in Hands Across the Table (1935), The Trail of the Lonesome Pine (1936) — an ambitious early outdoor 3-strip Technicolor hit, co-starring with Henry Fonda and Sylvia Sidney directed by Henry Hathaway — The Princess Comes Across (1936), and True Confession (1937). MacMurray spent the decade learning his craft and developing a reputation as a solid actor. In an interesting sidebar, artist C.C. Beck used MacMurray as the initial model for a superhero character who would become Fawcett Comics’ Captain Marvel in 1939.

The 1940s gave him his chance to shine. He proved himself in melodramas such as Above Suspicion (1943) and musicals (Where Do We Go from Here? (1945)), somewhat ironically becoming one of Hollywood’s highest-paid actors by 1943, when his salary reached $420,000. He scored a huge hit with the thoroughly entertaining The Egg and I(1947), again teamed with Ms. Colbert and today largely remembered for launching the long-running Ma and Pa Kettle franchise. In 1941, MacMurray purchased a large parcel of land in Sonoma County, California and began a winery/cattle ranch. He raised his family on the ranch and it became the home to his second wife, June Haver after their marriage in 1954. The winery remains in operation today in the capable hands of their daughter, Kate MacMurray. Despite being habitually typecast as a “nice guy”, MacMurray often said that his best roles were when he was cast against type by Billy Wilder. In 1944, he played the role of “Walter Neff”, an insurance salesman (numerous other actors had turned the role down) who plots with a greedy wife Barbara Stanwyck to murder her husband in Double Indemnity (1944) — inarguably the greatest role of his entire career. Indeed, anyone today having any doubts as to his potential depth as an actor should watch this film. He did another stellar turn in the “not so nice” category, playing the cynical, spineless “Lieutenant Thomas Keefer” in the 1954 production of The Caine Mutiny (1954), directed by Edward Dmytryk. He gave another superb dramatic performance cast against type as a hard-boiled crooked cop in Pushover (1954).

Despite these and other successes, his career waned considerably by the late 1950s and he finished out the decade working in a handful of non-descript westerns. MacMurray’s career got its second wind beginning in 1959 when he was cast as the dog-hating father figure (well, he was a retired mailman) in the first Walt Disney live-action comedy, The Shaggy Dog (1959). The film was an enormous hit and Uncle Walt green lighted several projects around his middle-aged star. Billy Wilder came calling again and he did a masterful turn in the role of Jeff Sheldrake, a two-timing corporate executive in Wilder’s Oscar-winning comedy-drama The Apartment (1960), with Shirley MacLaine and Jack Lemmon — arguably his second greatest role and the last one to really challenge him as an actor. Although this role would ultimately be remembered as his last great performance, he continued with the lightweight Disney comedies while pulling double duty, thanks to an exceptionally generous contract, on TV.

MacMurray was cast in 1961 as Professor Ned Brainerd in Disney’s The Absent Minded Professor (1961) and in its superior sequel, Son of Flubber (1963). These hit Disney comedies raised his late-career profile considerably and producer Don Feddersonbeckoned with My Three Sons (1960) debuting in 1960 on ABC. The gentle sitcom staple remained on the air for 12 seasons (380 episodes). Concerned about his work load and time away from his ranch and family, Fred played hardball with his series contract. In addition to his generous salary, the “Sons” contract was written so that all the scenes requiring his presence to be shot first, requiring him to work only 65 days per season on the show (the contract was reportedly used as an example by Dean Martin when negotiating the wildly generous terms contained in his later variety show contract). This requirement meant the series actors had to work with stand-ins and posed wardrobe continuity issues. The series moved without a hitch to CBS in the fall of 1965 in color after ABC, then still an also-ran network with its eyes peeled on the bottom line, refused to increase the budget required for color production (color became a U.S. industry standard in the 1968 season). This freed him to pursue his film work, family, ranch, and his principal hobby, golf.

Politically very conservative, MacMurray was a staunch supporter of the Republican Party; he joined his old friend Bob Hope and James Stewart in campaigning for Richard Nixon in 1968. He was also widely known one of the most — to be polite — frugal actors in the business. Stories floated around the industry in the 60s regarding famous hard-boiled egg brown bag lunches and stingy tips. After the cancellation of My Three Sons in 1972, MacMurray made only a few more film appearances before retiring to his ranch in 1978. As a result of a long battle with leukemia, MacMurray died of pneumonia at the age of eighty-three in Santa Monica on November 5, 1991. He was buried in the Holy Cross Cemetery in Culver City.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Dave Curbow and Mike Bischoff and Jack Backstreet

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Susan Anspach

 

Susan Anspach

“Guardian” April 2018 Obituary:

With her vibrant appearance in Bob Rafelson’s landmark road movie Five Easy Pieces (1970), Susan Anspach, who has died aged 75, emerged at the same time as her co-star Jack Nicholson as a significant figure in the new Hollywood of the 1970s. However, Anspach, unlike Nicholson, saw her film career dwindle after a decade that has been called Hollywood’s last golden age.

“I was getting reviews that compared me to Katharine Hepburn and Bette Davis,” Anspach said in 1978. “But there were no Hepburn or Davis parts.” Nevertheless, she made the most of the strong female roles she was given in the Rafelson movie, and in Play It Again, Sam (1972), as the ex-wife of a film critic (Woody Allen), and Blume in Love (1973), as the ex-wife of a divorce lawyer (George Segal) – both former husbands are still in love with her.

She was born in New York City, to Renald Anspach, a factory worker, and Trudy Kehoe, a singer. After studying music and drama at the Catholic University of America in Washington, DC, Anspach began to get parts off-Broadway, notably in a revival of Arthur Miller’s A View from the Bridge (1965) alongside Robert Duvall and Jon Voight.

Anspach’s radical credentials were early in evidence when she took the lead role of the hippy queen, Sheila, in one of the first performances of Hair: The American Tribal Love-Rock Musical off-Broadway in 1967. She appeared in TV series such as The Defenders and The Patty Duke Show, before making her feature film debut in The Landlord (1970), Hal Ashby’s satire on race relations. With a malicious twinkle in her eye, she played the liberated sister of Elgar (Beau Bridges), who has bought a building in a black neighbourhood, to the horror of his stultifying bourgeois family.

In Five Easy Pieces, she was a pianist who semi-reluctantly gives in sexually to her fiance’s drifter brother (Nicholson), though she later asks: “Why should I go with you? If a person has no love for himself, no respect for himself, no love for his friends, family, work … how can he ask for love in return?”

In Play It Again, Sam, Anspach appears in Allen’s imagination, talking about the breakdown in their marriage, and why she dumped him. She seems to have made a speciality of playing wives who break up with husbands, mainly to assert their freedom. In Paul Mazursky’s Blume in Love, she was the newly liberated social worker who leaves her husband (Segal) for a musician (played by the country music singer-composer Kris Kristofferson).

It would be five years before she resumed her film career because “I was asked to do little more than what TV couldn’t do – take off your clothes and swear.” She did neither in the mediocre comedy thriller The Big Fix (1978) as a 60s student radical who get mixed up with a private eye (Richard Dreyfuss).

In Montenegro or Pigs and Pearls (1981), a Swedish-UK co-production directed by the anarchic Serbian film-maker Dušan Makavejev, Anspach gave a tour de force performance as a middle-class housewife whose boredom drives her to the edge of madness until she frees her libido with a gang of Serbian immigrant workers. According to the critic Roger Ebert: “Susan Anspach, who is not robust, and who is in fact rather shy and frail, may not seem like a likely candidate to enter this world, but she undergoes a transformation in the movie, from the suppressed, unbalanced housewife into a woman who was born to embrace Rabelaisian excess.

As well as a few inconsequential feature films, Anspach appeared in miniseries including The Yellow Rose (1983), Space (1985) and The Slap Maxwell Story (1987).

She is survived by Catherine, her daughter from a relationship with the actor Steve Curry, with whom she starred in Hair, and Caleb, her son with Nicholson. Both children were adopted by Mark Goddard, the Lost in Space actor, to whom Anspach was married from 1970 until 1978, though she expressed a disbelief in marriage. Her second marriage, in 1982, to the musician Sherwood Ball, also ended in divorce.

 Susan Florence Anspach, actor, born 23 November 1942; died 2 April 2018

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Susanna Foster

Susanna Foster

“Guardian” obituary by Ronald Bergan from 2009:

Radiating youth and beauty, and singing with an immaculate and fresh coloratura soprano voice in 11 Hollywood movies from 1939 to 1945, Susanna Foster, who has died aged 84, appeared to have everything. At the age of 19 she shone in her most memorable role as the operatic diva Christine Dubois in Phantom of the Opera (1943), which co-starred Nelson Eddy and Claude Rains. Her earnings from her Universal Studios contract enabled her to rescue her family from poverty. Yet, 13 years later, she was struggling to survive and bring up her two young sons, and her financial and mental situation worsened over the years.

Foster admitted that she was partly to blame for her changed circumstances, saying that she had made the wrong choices, including leaving films at the height of her popularity, walking out on her marriage and, when only 12 years old, turning down the title role in National Velvet because “there was no singing in it”. Eight years later, MGM’s film was to make Elizabeth Taylor a star.

Foster, who called herself a “skinny waif” at the time, was one of many well-scrubbed youngsters that MGM was grooming for stardom but, unlike Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland, with whom she was at school, she was released by the studio after a further proposition fell through. It was to be called B Above High C, a reference to the upper register of her voice.

Foster, who was born Suzanne DeLee Flanders Larson, in Chicago, and raised in Minneapolis, began to sing at the age of five, imitating the screen sopranos Grace Moore and Jeanette MacDonald. Paramount snapped her up as a teenager, casting her in the biopic The Great Victor Herbert (1939). She was a hit, playing Allan Jones and Mary Martin’s daughter, and sang Kiss Me Again brilliantly, which prompted the New York Times to write: “The charming juvenile songstress Susanna Foster is a newcomer who is going to be very bearable to watch.” After seeing Foster in the film, the newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst flew her to his estate for a private recital for him and his mistress, Marion Davies, the former film star.

There’s Magic in Music (1941), a showcase for several young musical talents, featured Foster as Toodles LaVerne, a burlesque queen who is discovered by a priest (Jones) and brought to a music camp to perfect her singing. In this role, she not only skillfully mimicked Marlene Dietrich but also sang operatic arias from Faust and Carmen. This led Universal to offer her the part of the diva in Phantom of the Opera when the studio’s biggest star, the juvenile soprano Deanna Durbin, turned it down.

Foster, seen for the first time in Technicolor, was suitably attractive as the prima donna of the Paris opera house, loved by three men, the disfigured composer of the title (Rains), a baritone (Eddy) and a police inspector (Edgar Barrier).

Universal then starred her opposite the energetic young dancer Donald O’Connor in Top Man (1943), a lively “let’s-put-on-a-show” teen musical, and This Is the Life (1944). Then, in Technicolor horror mode again, and in an attempt to repeat the huge success of Phantom of the Opera, came The Climax (1944), in which Foster is under the malign influence of a mad doctor, played by Boris Karloff, who wants to prevent her from singing for anyone but himself. She sings, with what one critic called “a very lusty larynx”, in arias from pseudo-operas.

After three more films, Bowery to Broadway (1944), Frisco Sal (1945) and That Night With You (1945), Foster decided to give up show business and concentrate on her singing. In fact, Universal, hoping she would return to films, financed a six-month stay in Europe under the tutelage of the dramatic soprano Dusolina Giannini. On her return from Europe, she sang at a ball at the White House, with President Harry Truman and Eleanor Roosevelt in attendance.

In 1948, Foster made her stage debut in the Victor Herbert operetta Naughty Marietta, opposite the baritone Wilbur Evans, whom she married. They toured together in a number of operettas and musical comedies, trading on her name as a film star. However, it was Evans who got a huge break, playing Emile de Becque to Mary Martin’s Nellie Forbush in the 1951 London production of South Pacific. A few years later, Foster suddenly left Evans, who was 20 years her senior, and whom she claimed never to have loved, taking her two young sons with her.

There followed years of living on and off welfare, and from hand to mouth. While trying to ensure her children were fed, she also attempted to help her alcoholic, widowed mother and mentally unstable younger sister. Foster, too, suffered depression and had problems with alcohol. In 1982, in order to save rent, she lived in her car at the beach in California. She was rescued for a while by a film fanatic, who let her share his squalid apartment, and she later cared for him when he lost his sight. In 1985, her younger son, who had become a drug addict, died of liver failure. Her surviving son, Michael, brought her back to the east coast, where she spent the last years of her life living in a nursing home.

Remembering her glowing screen performances only adds extra poignancy to her tragic decline.

 Susanna Foster (Suzanne DeLee Flanders Larson), actor and singer, born 6 December 1924; died 17 January 2009

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Kieu Chinh

Kieu Chinh

IMDB:

Veteran Vietnamese born actress Kieu Chinh is best known to moviegoers for her role as Suyuan Woo in the 1991 film “The Joy Luck Club”. She also made a notable guest appearance on the hit CBS-TV series “M*A*S*H” as Kyung Soon, an aristocratic South Korean socialite whom Hawkeye begins to fall in love with (which is reciprocated) after he’s enlisted by Colonel Potter to attend to her sick mother in the episode “In Love and War” (directed by Alan Alda) in the series’ sixth season.

In the 1960s, in addition to Vietnamese films, she also appeared in several American productions including “A Yank in Viet-Nam” (1964) and “Operation C.I.A.”‘ (1965), the latter opposite Burt Reynolds. Kieu Chinh also produced a war epic “Nguoi Tình Khong Chan Dung” (Warrior, Who Are You) (1971), which later would be remastered and shown in the U.S. at the 2003 Vietnamese International Film Festival.

In 1975, while Kieu Chinh was on the set in Singapore, communist North Vietnamese overran Saigon. Kieu Chinh left for the U.S. where she resumed her acting career in a 1977 episode of M*A*S*H “In Love and War”, written by Alan Alda and loosely based on her life story.

Kieu Chinh subsequently acted in feature films as well as TV-movies including The Children of An Lac”, “Hamburger Hill” (1987), “Riot” (1997), “Catfish in Black Bean Sauce” (1999), “Face” (2002), “Journey From The Fall” (2005), and the FOX-TV series “21” (2008).

From 1989 to 1991, she had a recurring role as Trieu Au on the ABC-TV Vietnam War drama series “China Beach”.

For over a decade, Chinh has been a lecturer of the Greater Talent Network in New York. She has been invited to give keynote addresses at Pfizer, Kellogg, Cornell University and University of San Diego. Kieu is also active in philanthropic work. Together with journalist Terry Anderson, she co-founded the Vietnam Children’s Fund, which has built schools in Vietnam attended by more than 25,000 students annually. Kieu Chinh and Anderson continue to serve as the Fund’s co-chair.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: twilliamson7