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Constance Bennett

Constance Bennett
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Alex Jennings

Alex Jennings
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John Michie

John Michie
John Michie

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Bo Svenson

Bo Svenson
Bo Svenson

IMDB Entry:

An award-winning actor, writer, producer and director, Bo Svenson has during his career worked with over one hundred Academy Award winners and/or nominees.   He is a prolific writer in addition to being an accomplished actor. His first novel, “For Love and Country”, was published in December 2015. His screenplay “Don’t Call Me Sir!” won the 2015 New York Screenplay Contest’s “Park Avenue Prize for Drama” and 1st Place in Drama at the 2015 Los Angeles Screenplay Contest — and his screenplay “For Love and Country” won two Gold Awards at the International Independent Film Awards.   He has several other screenplays in various stages of development and preproduction, including “Yakuzano”; “Misguided”; “Viking: The Red Cloth”; and “Fate, Two Kids and an ET”.

Born in Sweden to a Russian Jewish mother and a Swedish father, Svenson emigrated by himself to the US as a teenager and began by serving his new country with six years in the U.S. Marines. After an honorable discharge, he was spotted in Miami by James Hammerstein Jr. and cast in a revival of “South Pacific”. Curious to find out if acting was for him, he headed to New York where he landed the lead role as Yang Sun in Bertolt Brecht’s play “The Good Woman of Szechuan” at The Circle In The Square Theater in Greenwich Village — and cast in a starring role in the CBS TV pilot The Freebooters.

Other starring roles followed, as well as a recurring role as Big Swede on “Here Come the Brides”. His role as the Creature in the three-hour TV movie “Mary Shelley’s Original Frankenstein” brought him great acclaim and led to a starring role in “Maurie” and the co-starring role with Robert Redford in “The Great Waldo Pepper”.

Major starring roles followed: Sheriff Buford Pusser in “Walking Tall Part II”, “Walking Tall Final Chapter” and the “Walking Tall” TV series; crazed football player Jo Bob in “North Dallas Forty”; heroic airline pilot Captain Campbell in “The Delta Force”; jealous bar-owner Roy Jennings in Clint Eastwood’s “Heartbreak Ridge”; and cold-blooded killer Ivan in “Magnum, P.I.”

In addition to recently being the Russian mob boss Vadim in “Icarus”, he portrayed Reverend Harmony in Quentin Tarantino’s “Kill Bill” and The Colonel in Tarantino’s “Inglourious Basterds”. He was the only actor from the original “The Inglorious Bastards” cast included by Tarantino in his homage to that movie, one of his all-time favorites.

An accomplished athlete, he has competed in world championships, Olympic selections and/or international competition in judo, yachting, track, and ice hockey — and he drove NASCAR.

A black belt in judo, karate, and aikido, he has been inducted into the Martial Arts Masters Hall of Fame. He retired from judo competition after winning a silver in the 2009 USA Judo National Championships, a bronze in the IJF World Judo Masters Championships, and a gold in the 2013 USJA Winter Nationals.

He was recently Sports Commissioner at the Special Olympics World Games: 2015 LA — held at his alma mater UCLA where he had pursued a Ph.D. in metaphysics until his film career took over.   He is president and CEO of MagicQuest Entertainment, a California corporation engaged in international motion picture and television development, production, and branded advertainment. MagicQuest also provides consulting service to actors and writers.

A member of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (Oscar.org) since 1987, he serves on the nominating committee for Best Foreign Language Film and is a juror on the Student Academy Award committee.   He was Chairman of the Board and CEO of the Motion Picture Group of America from 1984-2004.   His numerous honors and nominations include Lifetime Achievement Awards from Action On Film, the Movieville International Film Festival, and The Reel Cowboys Hall of Fame; the NAACP Image Award Nomination; the Academy of Science Fiction and Fantasy Golden Scroll Award; the Hollywood Women’s Press Club Golden Apple; the Screen Actors Guild Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast for Inglourious Basterds; and the Italian Institute of Art Award of Merit.

His short film, “Made For Each Other” — that he wrote, produced and directed starring Dennis Hopper — was nominated for Best Short at numerous festivals and won the Award of Excellence at the Accolade Global Film Competition.   He conducts “Acting for Life – Be All You That You Can Be” seminars in colleges, universities and corporate boardrooms around the globe.

– IMDb Mini Biography By: Val Verse

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Ed Begley

Image result for ed begley

 

 

Ed Begley
Ed Begley

Reliable veteran character player, effective as sneering, insidious blowhards in films like “Twelve Angry Men” (1957) and in his Oscar-winning turn in “Sweet Bird of Youth” (1962). Father of actor Ed Begley, Jr.

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Actor Signatures

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Patrick Wymark

Patrick Wymark
Patrick Wymark

IMDB Entry:

Patrick Wymark was born on July 11, 1920 in Cleethorpes, Lincolnshire, England as Patrick Carl Cheeseman. He was an actor, known for Where Eagles Dare (1968), Repulsion (1965) and The Power Game (1965). He was married to Olwen Wymark. He died on October 20, 1970 in Melbourne, Australia

Children: Jane Wymark (b. 31 October 1952), Rowan Wymark ( b. 1954), Dominic Wymark (b. 1960), Tristram Wymark (b. 1962).   He died just as the film he was currently appearing in, Cromwell (1970), was about to be released in the U.S.   Was offered the part of “Theodore Maxible” (played by Marius Goring) in Doctor Who (1963): Evil Of The Daleks” but illness prevented him from taking the role.   Born and raised in the Grimsby area. Wymark View is named after him.
Died of a heart attack three days before opening in an Australian run of Anthony Shaffer‘s “Sleuth”, in which he was to play author Andrew Wyke, at Melbourne’s Playbox Theatre in October 1970. His body was discovered by the actor John Fraser.   Collapsed onstage at the Devonshire Park Theatre, Eastbourne in October 1969, due to a severe nasal hemorrhage.
British character actor with radio and stage experience from 1951. Studied at University College in London and learned acting at the Old Vic Theatre School. Toured South Africa in 1952 and subsequently appeared in many Shakespearean roles in Stratford-upon-Avon. Busy television actor from the late 1950’s, popular as ruthless tycoon John Wilder in The Plane Makers (1963). Also noted for his voice-overs for Winston Churchill in two documentary features.
Was asked to play The Second Doctor in Doctor Who (Source Ice Warriors DVD Production Notes).
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Irish Actors – Signatures

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Georgia Engel

Georgia Engal
Georgia Engal

 

“Wikipedia” entry:

Engel was born in Washington, D.C., the daughter of Ruth Caroline (née Hendron) and Benjamin Franklin Engel, who was a Coast Guard admiral.[3] Engel attended Walter Johnson High School and the Academy of the Washington Ballet.

Engel appeared as Georgette Franklin Baxter on The Mary Tyler Moore Show from 1972 until the show ended in 1977. The role won her two Emmy nominations. After that series ended, she teamed up with former Mary Tyler Moore Show co-star Betty White for The Betty White Show during its first and only (1977–1978) season. She later co-starred in two short-lived 1980 sitcoms, Goodtime Girls, as Loretta Smoot,[8] and in Jennifer Slept Here featuring Ann Jillian.

Engel had a recurring role on Coach as Shirley Burleigh and starred as the voice of Love-a-Lot Bear in The Care Bears Movie (1985). She played a good witch in a 2007 recurring role[10][11] of Esmeralda[12][13] on the now-defunct NBC soap opera Passions. Engel received consecutive Emmy nominations as outstanding guest actress in a comedy series in 2003, 2004, and 2005 for her role on Everybody Loves Raymond as Robert Barone‘s mother-in-law, Pat MacDougall.[14]

While her movie appearances have been sporadic, Engel made her film debut in Miloš Forman’s first English language movie Taking Off[15] for which she was nominated for a British Academy Award for best supporting actress. Other film appearances include The Outside Man (1973),[16] Signs of Life (1989), [17] Papa Was a Preacher (1987),[18] The Sweetest Thing (2002)[19] and the made-for-TV movies The Day the Women Got Even (1980)[20] and A Love Affair: The Eleanor and Lou Gehrig Story (1978).

She lent her voice to the animated films Open Season (2006),[22] Open Season 2 (2009),[23] Dr. Dolittle 2, and Open Season 3 (2011).

Engel returned to her stage roots in 2006, appearing on Broadway in the musical The Drowsy Chaperone, with Sutton Foster and Edward Hibbert. She created the role of Mrs. Tottendale, which she continued to perform, leaving the Broadway production as of April 1, 2007.[25] She was featured in the North American tour, performing in Toronto in September 2007,[26] through engagements at the Orpheum Theater in San Francisco, in August 2008,[and at the Denver Performing Arts Complex in October 2008.

For the summers of 2004, 2005, 2007, 2009, and 2010, Engel appeared in various productions at The Muny Theater in Forest Park in St. Louis, Missouri. She most recently appeared in Show Boat in August 2010 as “Parthy”. In July 2005 she appeared in Mame as “Agnes Gooch”, in June 2007 she appeared in Oklahoma! as “Aunt Eller”, and in July 2009 she appeared as “Mrs. Paroo” in The Music Man.

In June 2010, Engel appeared at the Ogunquit Playhouse in Ogunquit, Maine production of The Drowsey Chaperone as Mrs. Tottendale. In October through December 2010, Engel was featured in the Vineyard Theatre‘s Off-Broadway production of Middletown, written by Will Eno.

In 2012, she appeared in episodes of The Office as an older lady being helped by Erin Hannon (Ellie Kemper) and in the episode called “Palmdale, Ech” of Two and a Half Men as the mother of Lyndsey MacElroy portrayed by Courtney Thorne-Smith. In March 2012, 35 years after the close of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, Engel was reunited with Betty White in the third season of Hot in Cleveland as Mamie Sue Johnson, best friend of White’s character Elka, in a continuing, recurring role.

Engel appeared in the new Annie Baker play John, which opened Off-Broadway at the Signature Theatre on July 22, 2015 (previews), directed by Sam Gold. The play ran to September 6, 2015.[39] The cast also features Lois Smith.   Engel was nominated for the 2016 Lucille Lortel Award, Outstanding Lead Actress in a Play for her role in this play.

Engel stars in the new musical Gotta Dance, which premiered at the Bank of America Theatre, Chicago on December 13, 2015, running through January 2016. The cast also stars Stefanie Powers, Lillias White and Andre DeShields. The musical is directed and choreographed by Jerry Mitchell, with a book by Chad Beguelin and Bob Martin, and the score by Matthew Sklar and Nell Benjamin.

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Barbara Eden

 

 

Barbara Eden
Barbara Eden

TCM Overview:

One of television’s most enduring icons, actress Barbara Eden unfortunately had great difficulty escaping her association with the character and show that made her a star, playing the 2,000-year-old Jeannie on the sitcom “I Dream of Jeannie” (NBC, 1965-1970). Prior to the beloved show, Eden appeared on a number of television shows like “Father Knows Best” (CBS, 1954-1960), “Gunsmoke” (CBS, 1955-1975) and “The Andy Griffith Show” (CBS, 1960-68), before starring on the small screen version of the hit movie, “How to Marry a Millionaire” (syndicated, 1957-59). She made the jump to features around this time and had an early co-starring role opposite Elvis Presley in “Flaming Star” (1960), before logging performances in “Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea” (1961) and “The Yellow Canary” (1963). But it was her performance as “Jeannie” that made her a household name, while bring a new level of sexuality to television, albeit with a nose-wiggling innocence. After the show was finished, Eden struggled to shake the image by starring in the horror movie “A Howling in the Woods” (1971) and in the comedy “Harper Valley PTA” (1978), but often to no avail. She later embraced the association with the naïve Jeannie and, though tame by modern standards, her brand of playful femininity was revolutionary for its time and helped open the doors for future television sex symbols.

Born Barbara Jean Moorhead on Aug. 23, 1934 (though some sources claim 1930), Eden’s parents divorced when the actress was three. Following her mother’s second marriage, Eden took the name Barbara Huffman after her stepfather, Harrison Connor Huffman. As a child, Eden suffered from a severe vision problem which required her to wear thick glasses and a sometimes eye patch. As a result, Eden grew up very shy. To help ease her daughter’s insecurities, her mother, Alice, arranged for young Barbara to take singing lessons which did indeed help alleviate her shyness. By the time she was a teenager, this “ugly duckling” had blossomed into an attractive young woman, graduating from San Francisco’s Abraham Lincoln High School in 1949. Moving to the Bay Area in the early 1950s, Eden made a living singing in nightclubs, but soon decided that a singing career was not in the cards for her. In 1951, Eden entered a local beauty pageant and won the title of Miss San Francisco â¿¿ the catalyst which propelled the actress to Hollywood.

In 1956, Eden made her screen debut in with a minor, uncredited role in “Back from Eternity.” Later that year, however, while performing in a local play, Eden was discovered “Hollywood style” by respected film director, Mark Robson. Impressed by Eden’s talent and beauty, Robson introduced her to casting directors at Twentieth Century Fox. Only a year after her debut, Eden landed the leading role on the television comedy “How to Marry a Millionaire” (1957-59), a show based on the 1953 film, in which Eden played Marilyn Monroe’s gold-digging character. Though this was her first sitcom, it would hardly be her last or her best known, for that matter. In the early 1960s, Eden branched out, appearing in a string of unremarkable films including “Flaming Star” (1960), “Five Weeks in a Balloon” (1962) and “The Yellow Canary” (1963). She also landed a co-starring role in Irwin Allen’s sci-fi outing, “Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea” (1961). At the same time, Eden maintained high visibility on the small screen with guest roles on such series as “The Andy Griffith Show” (CBS, 1960-68), “Route 66″(CBS, 1960-64), and “Gunsmoke” (CBS, 1955-1975).

In 1965, Eden finally landed the role that would define her career â¿¿ as the star and title character of the fantasy sitcom, “I Dream of Jeannie.” Created by prolific novelist Sidney Sheldon, the series was a direct response to rival the popular “Bewitched” (ABC, 1964-1972). Both shows shared a similar premise: the misadventures of a sexy sorceress who falls in love with a bumbling mortal and must adjust to life in suburbia. As hoped, “Jeannie” quickly proved to be a huge success. Over the show’s five year run, Eden was twice nominated for Golden Globe Awards, as was her co-star, Larry Hagman. Ironically, for a show that relied so heavily on its sex appeal, “Jeannie” had to play things remarkably coy in order to satisfy NBC’s prudish standards. The most famous example of this was the network’s “No Navel Edict,” which barred Eden from baring her belly button in any way. Appropriately enough, “Jeannie” ended just as the sexual revolution was redefining women’s roles. By the time it went off the air, the once risqué show was already considered a “quaint” remnant of a bygone era.

Post-“Jeanie,” Eden starred in the lightweight 1978 feature film comedy based on the 1968 Jeannie C. Riley country hit, “Harper Valley PTA.” The film’s success spawned a short-lived TV series of the same name, “Harper Valley PTA” (NBC, 1981-82), in which Eden reprised her role. Since then, the actress appeared on screen only intermittently. In 1991, Eden was signed to a five-episode guest-starring role on “Dallas” (CBS, 1978-1991), reuniting her with Hagman. In 1998, it was reported that Eden would make a cameo as Jeannie’s aunt in a feature remake of “I Dream of Jeannie” starring Alicia Silverstone. Though the film was never produced, Eden got to play a similar role in 2002 as Sabrina’s Great Aunt Irma on the hit comedy series, “Sabrina, The Teenage Witch” (ABC, 1996-2003).

The above TCM Overview can also be accessed online here.