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Gareth Forwood

Gareth Forwood

Actor. Born Gareth L. J. Forwood in Marylebone, London, the only child of actors Glynis Johns and Anthony Forwood. He made his film debut at Lt. Pacekering in ‘The Bofors Gun’ in 1968, he then appeared in a small role in the ‘Battle of Britain’ the following year. He made a niche for himself on British television appearing in such series as ‘The Wednesday Play,’ ‘Eyeless in Gaza,’ ‘Crown Court,’ ‘Funny Man,”In Sickness and in Health,’ and ‘The Bill.’ Other feature films included most notably ‘Birth of the Beatles’ (1979), ‘Ghandi’ (1982), ‘King Ralph’ (1991), and ‘Electric Moon’ (1992). His last film appearance was in 2000 in the television movie ‘Bomber.’ He died in London at age 62.

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Geoffrey Burridge

Geoffrey Burridge

Geoffrey Burridge (4 December 1948 – 30 September 1987) was an English actor noted for his performances in theatre and television.

On television, he appeared as Mark Proctor in early episodes of Emmerdale Farm and is also remembered for his guest appearance in Blake’s 7 (as Dorian in the episode “Rescue”).

He also appeared as the undead murdered man with his fiancée in the sex cinema scene, when they give advice to David on how to commit suicide before the next full moon in John Landis‘s 1980 film, An American Werewolf in London. He also appeared in the 1978 BBC tv drama by Derek Lister, ‘the Ice house’ as one of the main characters ‘Clovis’.

His extensive theatre credits included many musicals, notably the 1972 West End revue, Cowardy Custard, the 1978 production of Beyond the Rainbow in the West End and the 1985 revival of Gigi.

He died in London from an AIDS-related illness in 1987, leaving a partner, the actor Alec McCowen, who refused to appear on This Is Your Life (British TV series) unless the relationship was acknowledged.

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Jean Arthur

Jean Arthur

This marvelous screen comedienne’s best asset was only muffled during her seven years’ stint in silent films. That asset? It was, of course, her squeaky, frog-like voice, which silent-era cinema audiences had simply no way of perceiving, much less appreciating. Jean Arthur, born Gladys Georgianna Greene in upstate New York, 20 miles south of the Canadian border, has had her year of birth cited variously as 1900, 1905 and 1908. Her place of birth has often been cited as New York City! (Herein we shall rely for those particulars on Miss Arthur’s obituary as given in the authoritative and reliable New York Times. The date and place indicated above shall be deemed correct.) Following her screen debut in a bit part in John Ford’s Cameo Kirby (1923), she spent several years playing unremarkable roles as ingénue or leading lady in comedy shorts and cheapie westerns. With the arrival of sound she was able to appear in films whose quality was but slightly improved over that of her past silents. She had to contend, for example, with the consummately evil likes of Dr. Fu Manchu (played by future “Charlie Chan” Warner Oland). Her career bloomed with her appearance in Ford’s The Whole Town’s Talking (1935), in which she played opposite Edward G. Robinson, the latter in a dual role as a notorious gangster and his lookalike, a befuddled, well-meaning clerk. Here is where her wholesomeness and flair for farcical comedy began making themselves plain. The turning point in her career came when she was chosen by Frank Capra to star with Gary Cooper in the classic social comedy Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936). Here she rescues the hero – thus herself becoming heroine! – from rapacious human vultures who are scheming to separate him from his wealth. In Capra’s masterpiece Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), she again rescues a besieged hero (James Stewart), protecting him from a band of manipulative and cynical politicians and their cronies and again she ends up as a heroine of sorts. For her performance in George Stevens’ The More the Merrier (1943), in which she starred with Joel McCrea and Charles Coburn, she received a Best Actress Academy Award nomination, but the award went to Jennifer Jones in The Song of Bernadette (1943) (Coburn, incidentally, won for Best Supporting Actor). Her career began waning toward the end of the 1940s. She starred with Marlene Dietrich and John Lund in Billy Wilder’s fluff about post-World War II Berlin, A Foreign Affair (1948). Thereafter, the actress would return to the screen but once, again for George Stevens but not in comedy. She starred with Alan Ladd and Van Heflin in Stevens’ western Shane (1953), playing the wife of a besieged settler (Heflin) who accepts help from a nomadic gunman (Ladd) in the settler’s effort to protect his farm. It was her silver-screen swansong. She would provide one more opportunity for a mass audience to appreciate her craft. In 1966 she starred as a witty and sophisticated lawyer, Patricia Marshall, a widow, in the TV series The Jean Arthur Show (1966). Her time was apparently past, however; the show ran for only 11 weeks.

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Barbara Leigh-Hunt

Barbara Leigh-Hunt

Barbara Leigh-Hunt was born in Bath, Somerset in 1935.   An expericned stage actress, she starred in Alfred Hitchcok’s “Frenzy” in 1972.

IMDB entry:

Barbara trained for the theatre at the Bristol Old Vic Theatre school then joined the Old Vic Company in London. After working in provincial repertory theatres she returned to the Bristol Old Vic to play Rosemary in ‘The Severed Head’ and transferred with the play to the west end. She returned again to Bristol to appear in ‘Love’s Labour’s Lost’ and ‘Henry V’ then toured Europe and Israel with them. She returned again to bristol for further productions then went on an American tour in ‘Measure For Measure’ and as Ophelia opposite her husband, Richard Pasco, in the title role of ‘Hamlet’ After her return to England she had a big success in the 1968 West End production of ‘Mrs Mouse Are You Within’. since then she’s made many appearances at the Old Vic, the National Theatre and the R.S.C. at the Aldwych. She made her television debut in 1965 in a episode of ‘No Hiding Place’ followed over the years with appearances in episodes of such as ‘Callan’, ‘Special Branch’, Inspector Morse’,’Ruth Rendell Mysterie’ and ‘Kavanagh Q.C.’ along with mini series of ‘The Brontes of Haworth’, ‘A Perfect Hero’ and ‘Wives and Daughters’. Her film debut was made in 1972 in Alfred Hitchcock’s ‘Frenzy’ which was quickly followed by ‘Henry VIII and His Six Wives, in which she played Catherine Parr, and ‘Bequest to the Nation’. Since then to date (2013) she’s only made 6 other films the best known being ‘Billy Elliot’ in which she only had a small part

– IMDb Mini Biography By: tonyman5

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Johnny Depp

Johnny Depp

Johnny Depp is an American actor, painter, character actor, comedian, singer, director, song-writer, author, screen-writer, film producer, art director, Discjockey, rock bassist, and musician. He started his film career by playing Glen Lantz in the 1984 horror film A Nightmare on Elm Street. He also appeared in the 1986 film Platoon with Charlie Sheen, Tom Berenger, and Willem Dafoe. In the 1990s, he starred as the title characters in the films Cry-Baby (1990), Edward Scissorhands (1990), Arizona Dream (1993), What’s Eating Gilbert Grape (1993), Benny & Joon (1993), Ed Wood (1994), Don Juan DeMarco (1995), Dead Man (1995) and Donnie Brasco (1997). He also starred in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas as Hunter S. Thompson (1998), The Ninth Gate as Dean Corso (1999), and Sleepy Hollow as Ichabod Crane (1999).

In the 2000s, he was in the films Chocolat (2000), Blow (2001), From Hell (2001), Once Upon a Time in Mexico (2003), Finding Neverland (2004), Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (2005), Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (2007), and Public Enemies (2009). He has played Captain Jack Sparrow in the Pirates of the Caribbean series, starting with 2003’s The Curse of the Black Pearl, and going on to reprise the role in Dead Man’s Chest (2006), At World’s End (2007), On Stranger Tides (2011) and Dead Men Tell No Tales (2017). For his roles in The Curse of the Black Pearl, Finding Neverland, and Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street, Depp was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor.

In 2010, Depp was cast as the Mad Hatter in the live-action film Alice in Wonderland. The same year, he went on to star in The Touristwith Angelina Jolie and was nominated for a Golden Globe Award for Best Actor in a Motion Picture Comedy. He has starred in The Rum Diary with Amber Heard (2011), Dark Shadows with Michelle Pfeiffer (2012), The Lone Ranger with Armie Hammer (2013), and Transcendence (2014) with Morgan Freeman.

His television work includes playing Officer Thomas “Tom” Hanson, Jr. in the crime drama 21 Jump Street from 1987 to 1990. He has also lent his voice to the animated series King of the Hill in 2004, SpongeBob SquarePants in 2009, and Family Guy in 2012.

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Niven Boyd

Niven Boyd

Niven Boyd was born on November 22, 1954 in Dursley, Gloucestershire, England. He was an actor, known for Sid and Nancy (1986), Out of Africa (1985) and Let Him Have It (1991). He died on January 28, 2001 in Hindon, Wiltshire, England.

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Michael Carr

Michael Carr

Michael Carr was born in 1930 and died in 2001.

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Daphne Anderson

Daphene Anderson

An actress of great grace and charm, Daphne Anderson played a central role in musical comedies and intimate revue in the 1940s and 1950s.

Having taken dancing classes, she made her professional debut as a member of the chorus in Cinderella at the Richmond Theatre in 1937-38. Later in 1938, she appeared at the Windmill Theatre in Revudeville, the non-stop variety show that featured tableaux of nude young women whom the law prevented from moving while on stage.

Her first substantial role was Dora in a tour of the Gershwins’ musical Funny Face. During the Second World War, she worked for the Entertainment National Services Association, the organisation set up to entertain the troops. Towards the end of the war, she began a long association with the Players Theatre, the ersatz music hall club underneath Charing Cross station.

In 1943, she appeared in a musical adaptation of Alice in Wonderland, playing both Father William and the walrus at the old Scala Theatre. Two years later, she was in a rather more upmarket revue than Revudeville – Noel Coward’s Sigh No More at the Piccadilly, in which she played the clairvoyant, Madame Arcati, in the Blithe Spirit Ballet.

Coward was evidently sufficiently impressed with her to give her a small part in Pacific 1860, his musical about a British colony set in Victorian times, at Drury Lane (1946-47).

After a revue at Bolton’s, a small theatre club in South Kensington, she returned to the West End to appear in a long forgotten Eric Maschwitz musical, Belinda Fair (1949). More work at the Players and another small theatre club, the Watergate, followed. She then landed the best role of her career, playing Polly Peachum in the Brecht/Weill musical, The Threepenny Opera (1956), at the Royal Court. The Stage commended her for exhibiting “the right blend of coarseness and charm”.

Her cinema career, which began in 1949, included three films of note – The Beggar’s Opera (1953), Hobson’s Choice (1954) and A Kid for Two Farthings (1955).

Daphne Anderson, who was born Daphne Scrutton on April 27, 1922, died on January 15, aged 90

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Gawn Granger

Gawn Granger

Some sources indicate he was born in Glasgow, Scotland on 12 October 1937. He is the son of Charles Neil Grainger and his wife Elizabeth (née Gall). Educated at Westminster City school in Victoria, London, he later trained for the stage at the Italia Conti Academy of Theatre Arts.

Grainger made his first London appearance as a boy in 1950, when he played the Boy King in Ivor Novello’s King’s Rhapsody at the Palace Theatre.

He began his professional career at the Dundee Rep in 1961, followed by two years at Ipswich, 1962–64. He joined Laurence Olivier‘s National Theatre at the Old Vic company in 1972.

Among his notable television credits are the Apostle Andrew in Son of Man by Dennis Potter (1969); the Earl of Kildare in The Shadow of the Tower (1972); George Stephenson in the Doctor Who serial The Mark of the Rani (1985) and Lesley Flux in Midsomer Murders episode The House in the Woods (2005). He was an occasional panellist on the syndicated, New York-based What’s My Line? series in 1968.

Grainger authored the following plays: Four to One (1976), Vamp Till Ready (1978), Lies in Plastic Smiles (1979) and Paradise Lost (1980).

His first marriage was to the actress Janet Key in 1970. Together they had two children. Their marriage lasted until Key’s death from cancer in July 1992. His second marriage is to American-British actress Zoë Wanamaker, to whom he has been married since November 1994.

Grainger was a close friend of Laurence Olivier and his family, and helped the actor write his second book On Acting (1986).

From February to April 2012 Grainger performed as Mr Balance in The Recruiting Officer, the 1706 late Restoration Comedy by Irish playwright, George Farquhar. It was the highly acclaimed first production for incoming artistic director Josie Rourke at The Donmar Warehouse in London. As a result of the particular interest generated in Grainger’s life over the course of the production, Mark Gatiss, his fellow cast member, instigated a Platform event which took place before the evening performance of The Recruiting Officer on 11 April.

During the discussion, Grainger confirmed some little known facts about his life and told anecdotes about his career over sixty years as both actor and playwright in the UK and US. Joking with Gatiss about some confusion around the date and place of his birth, he commented that he appeared to have been born twice, in 1937 in Glasgow and in 1940 in Northern Ireland. He admitted that the latter had been a twist on a then more romantic notion of theatrical heritage. It was at this point that Grainger also revealed that he learned that his biological father had in fact been his parents’ lodger who later went on to marry his mother. He expressed gratitude to his father for bringing him along as a small boy to theatrical events which he humorously described and which had a positive effect on his imagination and determination to engage with performance. He began writing for the stage prior to his professional acting debut, having his first play performed at the age of twenty-one. Following a distinguished acting career, most particularly at the National Theatre in London, Grainger worked on writing projects in the 1980s whilst his children grew up. He returned to acting in the 1990s at the insistence of Harold Pinter, who, when asked by Grainger, “why should I return to acting?”, replied, “because you owe it to yourself”.

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Moira Cusack

Moira Cusack